News

News: Animal Utilization

USSEC Offers Technical Assistance to U.S. Soy Customers from Romania

Monday, May 22, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
During the second week of April, USSEC met with integrated companies and feed mills from Romania to listen to and understand their challenges and offer technical assistance…

During the second week of April, USSEC met with integrated companies and feed mills from Romania to listen to and understand their challenges and offer technical assistance to customers of U.S. Soy. USSEC consultants Dr. Craig Coon, professor of poultry nutrition at the University of Arkansas, and Dr. Jan van Eys, animal utilization consultant from France, traveled to Romania to visit with large and rapidly expanding companies; all were top companies in their respective fields in southern Romania. Meeting with managers, quality control managers, nutritionists, and veterinarians was instructive and enhanced the access of U.S. Soy to these customers.

Together with the specialists at the companies visited, the USSEC experts reviewed the businesses’ quality control programs and laboratory methods. At this stage, the feed mill laboratories are pre-formatted and are under excellent management, thanks to the investments and high level of investment in the education of young professionals.

Dr. Craig Coon and Dr. Jan van Eys emphasize the nutritional and logistics advantages of purchasing U.S. Soy for feed manufacturers and poultry producers

 

High levels of certain mycotoxins have been detected over the past year in the imported South American soybean meal in Romania and continue to be a problem for feed and livestock producers. Dr. Coon emphasized seasonal advantage (September to March), good infrastructure, and logistics as key advantages of U.S. Soy during discussions with the technical personnel of the companies visited.

USSEC animal utilization consultant Dr. Jan van Eys discusses soybean meal analysis results during field visits in Romania

 

Dr. van Eys, the author of the USSEC Soy Quality Manual, pointed out that careful attention should be paid to KOH protein solubility index since feed manufacturers around the world often found this quality parameter below the recommended levels and needing to be constantly investigated. Similarly, soybean meal carbohydrate levels are highly variable and have to be constantly analyzed compared with reference values.

The meetings with feed mill managers, quality control managers, nutritionists, and veterinarians were informative and allowed USSEC to gain a better understanding of the reality of the Romanian poultry and feed industries and its potential for progress and expansion. It clearly showed the opportunities and potential that exist in the Romanian market for growth in poultry production, and, consequently for the use of U.S. Soy products.

Specifically, USSEC should assist or continue provide local feed producers and integrations with information and support to enhance the understanding and importance of quality measures and formulation advantages/techniques to increase the performance of feeds and animals and, through this, show the potential of U.S. Soy.

USSEC Organizes Poultry Nutrition Seminar in Egypt

Monday, May 22, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News Middle East / North Africa 
USSEC, in cooperation with the Egyptian Poultry Producers Association, organized a poultry nutrition seminar in Cairo, Egypt on May 14. Dr. Craig Coon, animal nutrition…

USSEC, in cooperation with the Egyptian Poultry Producers Association, organized a poultry nutrition seminar in Cairo, Egypt on May 14.

Dr. Craig Coon, animal nutrition professor at the University of Arkansas, gave two presentations to the Egyptian Poultry Producers Association, speaking about broiler breeder nutrition and broiler nutrition. He focused on how the breeder has changed over the past 25 years, discussing some of the nutrition and reproduction problems that occurred in the 90s, comparing them to some of the main issues of concern with the modern breeder. Dr. Coon’s students have generated data on breeders over the past 20 years and he discussed some of the key biological concepts that his students have developed.

A key phenomenon that has been uncovered is how protein turnover changes are linked to body composition in the pullet and breeder hen in production. The breeder dramatically decreases the fractional protein synthesis rate in breast and leg muscles at sexual maturity and elevates fractional protein breakdown rates. The breeder loses lean mass from peak production through 40 weeks and then gains lean mass from 45 to 65 weeks. The breeder supplements the feed nutrients with the breakdown of body skeletal protein during the early production period from sexual maturity to 37 weeks and then switches fuel and mobilizes body fat during the last portion of production (45 to 65 weeks). The breeders were also evaluated in metabolic chambers and the data shows that the respiratory exchange rate (RER) is highest during early production with the largest decline occurring at 45 weeks. The lower RER values in breeders shows that the largest amount of body fat is used near the 45 week mark. The body fat increases in breeders from sexual maturity until 45 weeks of age and then declines from 45 to 65 weeks. A key observation is the large amount of heat produced in breeders during the last portion of production. The Arkansas team believes the increased heat production is because of the protein accretion that occurs during the late production period. Dr. Coon thinks that future feeding systems for breeders will need to account for the protein accretion that is occurring in breeders. The maintenance requirement of broiler breeders is much larger than the requirement for daily egg production or weight gain and the requirement will continue to increase with the added protein accretion in the modern breeder.

In the second presentation, Dr. Coon discussed the response of the modern broiler to dietary amino acids and energy. The University of Arkansas team has worked with Evonik and showed with four large feeding studies that the modern broiler responds to added amino acids above the standard requirements. The broiler improves weight gain, feed conversion ratio (FCR), processing weight, and yield with amino acids. The broiler also shows that increasing AME with lysine will improve weight and FCR, but the weight gain is primarily increased fat and not protein. Economics need to be involved in making the decision of selecting the optimum digestible lysine:Mcal for your market. Dr. Coon and group have also been evaluating NE while feeding increased amino acid concentration with same energy density and also looked at NE when adding dietary energy with same amino acid concentration. Additionally, the Arkansas group has been evaluating different nutritional programs for the heavy broiler during the 42-56 day period. Dr. Coon talked about white striping and woody breast problems that may occur with the larger broilers.

Dr. Coon was very effective in presenting his technical messages to the audience. In attendance were 35 high-level management and industry participants from Egypt.

Seminar participants

 

A few seminar participants

 

Dr. Craig Coon speaks to attendees

 

 

USSEC Holds 3rd Advanced Training Program for MENA Veterinarians

Monday, May 22, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe Middle East / North Africa 
USSEC’s 3rd Annual Advanced Training Program for Veterinarians from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) was held at the University of Florida, College of Veterinary…

USSEC’s 3rd Annual Advanced Training Program for Veterinarians from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) was held at the University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine, in Gainesville, Florida from May 15- 19. 22 industry-leading veterinarians from the poultry industries of Egypt, Morocco, Tunisia, and Turkey participated in this educational program.

Presentations focused on practical application involving vaccination, disease control, and management in commercial poultry. This forum stimulated considerable discussions among the veterinarians from the different countries and provided ample opportunity for the exchange of ideas.

USSEC again has played a leading role in providing technical support for the MENA region’s commercial poultry industry.

Group picture

 

Participants at the training program

 

Some participants at the training program

USSEC Maghreb Trade Team Visits U.S.

Monday, May 22, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News Middle East / North Africa 
USSEC Middle East – North Africa (MENA) recently organized a trade team visit composed of leading animal industry representatives from main Maghreb companies to the…

USSEC Middle East – North Africa (MENA) recently organized a trade team visit composed of leading animal industry representatives from main Maghreb companies to the U.S. The objective was to show the strength, reliability, and sustainability of the U.S. soybean value chain from fields to port facility.

Improving knowledge of the U.S. soybean value chain and highlighting the advantages of U.S. soybean meal were other targets of the visit, as assisting participating customers to meet soy suppliers and allied industries to ultimately build opportunities for the U.S. soybean products trade.

Khalid Benabdeljelil, USSEC consultant – Morocco, escorted the Maghreb team of nine customers from Morocco and two from Tunisia. The team, composed of a crusher, feed mill purchasing makers, and integrators, had the opportunity to meet with U.S. suppliers and allied industries.

The visit to CHS facilities in Morris, Minnesota was for most team members a first time visit to loading facilities, where they discussed logistics in the U.S., transport time, loading, and exporting processes. R.J. O’Brien updated the team on the company’s activities, providing insights and outlook on soy business worldwide.

Perdue company representatives discussed their activities in relation to U.S. soybeans, sourcing, the flexibility of shipping through the port at Norfolk, Virginia, the numerous possibilities offered at their location, and their supplies to the two important Maghreb markets.

The visit to Thionville Laboratories covered specific interests expressed by customers. The president of the company extended a warm welcome to the team and explained technical aspects of surveying, its advantages conditions, and requirements. Laboratory staff discussed analytical issues regarding sampling procedures, analytical methods, equipment and resources available.

Meetings and visits at RMG provided visiting customers with first-hand exposure on the advantages of U.S. Soy in relation to infrastructure, transportation, and logistics assuring on time deliveries of high quality products.

Participants had the opportunity to interact with USSEC member firms and discuss their specific supply issues and interests in-depth, covering key aspects of soybean meal, products, exports, technical, trade, and marketing.

The trip was a great success with the team expressing their appreciation to USSEC and all the companies and firms visited. Customers from the two markets, who are all users of U.S. soybean meal and other soy products in their operations, learned more about the U.S. soybean value chain, its sustainability, and the advantages of U.S. soybean meal, which offered an opportunity to continue to build a preference for U.S. Soy.

Visit and discussions at CHS Morris loading facility

 

Visit and discussions at CHS Morris loading facility

 

Visit and discussions at CHS Morris loading facility

 

Thomas Russell with the team at RMG headquarters

 

Visit at Perdue Company

 

Visit at Thionville laboratory

 

Visit at Eurofins Laboratory

 

Visit at Thionville laboratory

 

Visit at Eurofins Laboratory

USSEC Publishes Biosecurity Guide for MENA Commercial Poultry Production

Monday, May 22, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News Middle East / North Africa 
USSEC recently published a biosecurity guide for commercial poultry production in the Middle East and North Africa in English, French, and Arabic. The guide aims to provide…

USSEC recently published a biosecurity guide for commercial poultry production in the Middle East and North Africa in English, French, and Arabic. The guide aims to provide farmers with the information they need to implement a successful biosecurity program, which will enable farmers to control and eliminate diseases that are currently devastating the poultry industry.

Over the past 20 years, the commercial poultry industry has grown tremendously worldwide. Due to chicken’s versatility as a food, consumption has increased, and it is lower priced and considered a healthier choice as compared to other meats. As the poultry industry has rapidly expanded, however, diseases have become more common and increasingly costly.

In many regions of the world, diseases in the commercial poultry industry have resulted in devastating losses and companies have been forced to rely on increasing amounts of vaccines and antibiotics to control these losses. In recent years, several diseases, including a variant Newcastle disease and several types of avian influenza, have become endemic, resulting in substantial deficits.

The success of the poultry industry depends on improved performance. This will allow the industry to continue to grow and increase its demand for soybeans.

Please use the links below to access the guides:

Biosecurity Guide ENGLISH BR 27

Biosecurity Guide FRENCH 12

Biosecurity Guide Arabic 17

USSEC Sponsors Networking Event for Dutch Feed Industry

Monday, May 15, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
On May 11, USSEC sponsored the annual networking event for the Dutch feed industry. Co-organized by the Royal Dutch Grain and Feed Trade Association (Het Comite) and the…

On May 11, USSEC sponsored the annual networking event for the Dutch feed industry. Co-organized by the Royal Dutch Grain and Feed Trade Association (Het Comite) and the Dutch Feed Industry Association (NEVEDI), the event took place in a former feed mill complex, innovatively renovated as an event space, on the outskirts of Utrecht, Netherlands. As in the past, the organizers chose a broad theme for presentations and discussion. USSEC has participated in prior year’s sessions on sustainability and protein sources of the future. This year’s theme was Consumer Demand.

The first speaker of the morning session set the tone and provided an outline of how “incidences” lead to trends, which lead to patterns. A Dutch psychologist provided an analysis on consumer behavior in the supermarket, dispelling the five myths of consumer behavior, noting that while price is important, sustainability is of increasing importance to at least two of the market segments. She noted the importance of the social environment and that providing more information and facts alone will not change consumer preferences. A motivating story is better than facts.

The afternoon session began with a presentation by a representative of the Dutch Society for the Protection of Animals who described a new market initiative to label meat on the retail level with “stars” based on their animal welfare standards. Science-based with input from all stakeholders, from producers to retailers, the program appears to be successful and is expanding with one of the major bulk/discount retailers in the Netherlands.

Brent Babb, USSEC Regional Director – Europe (EU) / Middle East –North Africa (MENA) provided a presentation on sustainable soybean production in the United States and the U.S. Soybean Sustainability Assurance Protocol (SSAP). He noted that NEVEDI was the first European organization to recognize the scheme and their critical assistance in having the scheme later recognized by FEFAC, the European-wide feed industry association. Mr. Babb also highlighted USSEC engagement with the Field to Market program and how this project engages a broad representation of interests, focused on continuous improvement and output metrics.

The final speaker of the day was an academic researcher who summarized her work on the lifecycle analysis of meat consumption, including “consequential analysis” of secondary impact. Among her conclusions is that switching from imported soybean meal to domestically produced rapeseed meal in animal feed would have a significant environmental impact, particularly in terms of greenhouse gases and energy use. She also defended a limited role for animal protein in meeting the global nutritional needs of the future.

At the end, all the speakers joined the directors of NEVEDI and Het Comite on the stage and participated in a discussion on various statements, with active voting and participation of the audience.

USSEC’s support for this event is critical and appreciated by the organizers. It provides a speaking platform for USSEC, enables networking and building contacts and critical insights into the current conditions and dynamics of the Dutch feed and livestock production industries. All involved look forward to next year’s event.

USSEC Regional Director – EU/MENA Brent Babb speaks to the audience

 

Closing panel discussion

USSEC Provides Soy Trade Price Risk Management Training to Chinese Soy Crushers and Feed Millers

Monday, May 15, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News North Asia 
USSEC conducted the 15th U.S. Soy Trade Price Risk Management Training on April 25 and 26 in Shanghai, China. Susan Sutherland of USSEC member CME / Chicago Board of Trade…

USSEC conducted the 15th U.S. Soy Trade Price Risk Management Training on April 25 and 26 in Shanghai, China. Susan Sutherland of USSEC member CME / Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT) and Bell Chen from USSEC member R. J. O’Brien provided training to a total of 45 trainees, soymeal sales managers from top U.S. soybean importing companies or soybean meal purchasing managers from top U.S. soybean importers’ preferred customer feed millers. USSEC Country Director – China Xiaoping Zhang participated in this activity and promoted the U.S. Soy Sustainability Assurance Protocol (SSAP) and the U.S. Soy Advantage, particularly amino acid profile, to the audience during his opening and closing remarks.

USSEC Country Director – China Xiaoping Zhang opens the 2017 US Soybean Trade Price Risk Management Training in Shanghai on April 25 and 26

 

In the soybean meal business, basis contract is becoming more popular, which has closely tied soybean meal sales and purchases with futures markets on the Dalian Commodity Exchange (DCE) and CME/CBOT. Just recently, DCE launched the first futures option contract in China’s futures trading history, i.e. options on soybean meal futures. Such market and risk management tools are so new to the majority of the feed industry that the timing is right to provide training on elementary futures trading to the industry. Additionally, an overall market outlook and case study were provided to the audience to help them better understand different market influencing factors, and hands-on practices were provided through a simulation for the audience to enhance their knowledge and skills of price risk management tools and economic effects. The audience regarded the evaluation and discussion of the strategies they used during different pricing stages in the simulation to be very valuable.

Susan Sutherland of CME/CBOT Group presents the basics of futures and basis to the sales and purchasing managers from key importers and end users at the risk management training

 

As in previous years, this program received strong support from CME/CBOT by recommending professional trainers and training materials. Tina Liao, director of client development and sales, based in Singapore, traveled to this event and provided assistance in educating the audience on futures and options basics.

Bell Chen of R J O’Brien presents a global soy market outlook and a trading case study to the audience to help them better understand all the different market influencing factors

 

USSEC Marketing Program Manager – China Yantian Zeng and Marketing Program Assistant Binbin Du organized the program and similar previous programs, which have all been well received by participants.

The trainees are participating in a simulation in groups so as to gain hands-on experience in hedging business, which was regarded as the most valuable part of the training

USSEC Holds Sustainable Soy, Poultry Production and Marketing for Southeastern and Central European Customers

Monday, May 15, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
For the past year, promoting sustainable agricultural supply chains has been an important subject, both in EU countries and globally. Recently, sustainably produced…

For the past year, promoting sustainable agricultural supply chains has been an important subject, both in EU countries and globally. Recently, sustainably produced feed, poultry, and livestock products have been a hot topic for Romanian and Polish poultry companies as well.

The poultry meat products in southeastern and central European countries are high quality due to excellent growing and modern slaughtering conditions but are sometimes unable to reach western markets because of export requirements often based on different certifications systems in different countries or increasing supermarket pressure and less because of consumer demand.

The sustainability of the poultry meat production system can be influenced by several factors, including the origination of ingredients, chemical composition, and nutrient digestibility of a diet, among others. Because the poultry industry is largely dependent on soy as its main protein source, this ingredient is tightly interlinked with sustainability today.

In an effort to show commitment to the Romanian and Polish poultry industries and build a preference for U.S. Soy, USSEC held a one day seminar on “Sustainable Soy, Poultry Production, and Marketing” in Bucharest, Romania with the goal to educate poultry nutritionists, veterinarians, management and marketing experts on U.S Sustainable Soy and poultry production.

Group photo from the seminar on May 12 in Bucharest, Romania

 

In his speech, Dr. Jan van Eys introduced the current market situation for feed and soy, followed by USSEC’s sustainability program and a discussion on quality differences among origins in anti-nutritional factors. These aspects were a good introduction for the other speakers.

The key messages delivered by Mack Graves, management and marketing consultant stressed how modern consumers today prefer meat products produced with sustainable ingredients. Sustainability is a new marketing tool for the meat industries, which can be good for business as well as the environment. Companies must become transparent in all they do to and establish consumer trust and enhance meat consumption. More than 90 percent of the soybean meal consumed in Romania and Poland is imported, either directly as meal or as soybeans that are locally processed into soybean meal. Soybean meal and beans are some of the ingredients for which the Romanian Feed Manufactures Association specifically supports industry initiatives in order to make the supply chain more sustainable.

As the local market and export demand for poultry meat grows, so too does demand for poultry feed. In recent years, the demand for vegetable protein meals for use in poultry feed has increased in Romania, and this trend is likely to continue over the coming decade. The increasing consumption of vegetal protein in feed, combined with increasing meat consumption and sophistication of the customer should raise important questions about how the supply of soybean meal can keep pace with rising demand for poultry feed. Collaboration between U.S. farmers, suppliers, and integrated poultry meat producers is a crucial part for sustainable animal production. Romanian poultry meat producers recognize U.S. farmers and suppliers for their continuous improvement and their effort to address the big issues associated with soy production such as environment protection, soil preservation and water quality.

USSEC consultants Dr. Craig Coon of Arkansas University , Dr. Jan van Eys from France, Mack Graves from the U.S. and guest speaker Rene Schepens of Fermentatio Experts Denmark gave papers in front of Romanian and Polish poultry industries delegates

 

Dr. Craig Coon presented the latest findings in the field of broiler and broiler breeders’ nutritional research. Genetic progress of broilers’ growth performance traits has been exponential in the past decades. Selection for increased growth rate (feed intake) has led to their improved efficiency through their capacity to process increasing amounts of nutrients on a daily basis. Feed intake is regulated not only by dietary energy level but also by the concentration of amino acids in the diet (balanced protein).

Rene Schepens from Fermentation Experts Denmark emphasized that fermented plant protein can replace fishmeal while fermentation of vegetal protein increases the efficiency of use of phosphorous (100 percent) and nitrogen (15 percent), avoids environmental pollution and increases profits. Indigestible and anti-nutritional components in the raw materials are converted into health promoters during fermentation, if it is done in the correct manner.

All the presentations were well received judging by the numbers of questions immediately after the presentation and during the rest of the meeting, especially breaks and the time allocated to one-on-one discussions.

 

There is an enormous worldwide additional need for protein (meat/eggs) in the future, and meanwhile, there is a limited availability and acceptance of animal protein in feed. Current animal farming practices emphasize on more natural rearing, fewer medicines/antibiotics and a continuing pressure to be efficient with inputs and output (N, P) are other two main trends in the Western feed and livestock business.

With the dependence of the Romanian and Polish poultry and feed industries on imported high quality protein ingredients such as fishmeal of soy protein concentrate (SPC) and/or soy protein isolate (SPI) for their specialty diets in broiler pre-starters and young animals, the development of substitutes such as fermented soybean meal is of major interest, both practical as well as economical.

By the end of the seminar, poultry professionals understood how to address the industry and marketing challenges and how the sustainability of meat production can be influenced through certification, manufacturing processes and policy change. A coordinated effort across the industry that includes ingredient purchasers, nutritionists and veterinarians and marketing managers may result in a more sustainable poultry industry in Romania.

USSEC Experts Speak About Sustainable Marketing to Romanian Poultry Meat Producing Companies

Monday, May 15, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
After several years of sustained growth, the Romanian poultry industry has reached a stage where the management and marketing needs to be fine-tuned. USSEC has understood…

After several years of sustained growth, the Romanian poultry industry has reached a stage where the management and marketing needs to be fine-tuned. USSEC has understood and answered the need of the poultry customers, organizing an exploratory visit from April 8-11 to understand the achievements and challenges of the poultry meat producers in Romania.

Mack Graves, a consultant specializing in corporate strategy, management focus, and marketing effectiveness in companies and organizations across the protein chain from beef to poultry, was invited together with USSEC animal consultant Dr. Jan van Eys, to visit with leading integrators in broiler and turkey meat production located in southern and central Romania. Bona Avis and Penes Curcanul are both important players and trendsetters within the Romanian market and commodity usage, and are consequently potential to increased soy usage.

USSEC consultants Mack Graves and Jan van Eys visited the poultry processing plant of Bona Avis and compared the U.S. and European poultry industries during an intensive discussion with company management

 

Several years ago, Mr. Graves consulted with poultry integrated companies in Romania on behalf of U.S. Soy farmers.

“I was pleasantly surprised to see during my visit to Romania the evolution of the consumer towards quality and convenience poultry meat products,” said Mr. Graves. “The poultry meat products today are high quality thanks to the investments in high quality farming technologies and modern poultry processing plants. From what we understood, the Romanian poultry meat is not always reaching the export markets because of different quality certifications systems from different markets. Entering new markets and reaching the increasing demand for quality of the consumer are part of the sustainable marketing strategy.”

Today’s modern consumers prefer meat products produced with sustainable ingredients. Sustainability is a new marketing tool for the meat industries, which is good for business as well as the environment.

“Companies must become transparent in all they do to establish consumer trust and enhance meat consumption,” Mr. Graves concluded.

Mr. Graves discusses the design and management of the poultry processing flow

 

Mr. Graves and Dr. van Eys visited with Global Lab, one of the top quality control laboratories for the feed and poultry industries in Romania

 

After his visit to Romania, Dr. van Eys reported, “Continuous promotional efforts to accompany the growth of this market and positioning of U.S. products in this market are recommended. Clearly, great progress has been made in the feed industry but some key opportunities for improvements remain. Those opportunities can be addressed by USSEC and, in the process, U.S. Soy will be promoted and profiled for its quality characteristics. The Romanian industry and market stands to grow significantly over the next several years, so an enhanced position of USSEC and U.S. Soy should translate in increased sales and opportunities.”

Management aspects were discussed with farm and feed mill managers from the visited companies in Romania

 

Dr. van Eys and Mr. Graves discussed the importance of feed management and poultry feeding

 

The importance of brand and quality delivered to consumers were emphasized by Mr. Graves during discussions with processing plant managers and marketing experts

 

A large variety of quality poultry meat products are available today in the Romanian market

USSEC Attends 27th Annual Conference of the Bulgarian Feed Manufacturers Association

Monday, May 15, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
During the third week of April, the Bulgarian Feed Manufacturers Association (BFMA) held their annual conference in Velingrad City. This was the 27th year of the industry’s…

During the third week of April, the Bulgarian Feed Manufacturers Association (BFMA) held their annual conference in Velingrad City. This was the 27th year of the industry’s annual meetings, with a record participation of over 120 guests from Bulgaria and neighboring countries: Turkey, Romania and Hungary.

They were part of an excellent conference program, with high level technical presentations of speakers of international companies from Germany, Hungary, Czech, Denmark, Turkey and the U.S.

Participants at the 27th Annual Conference of the Bulgarian Feed Manufacturers Association

 

USSEC’s team of consultants, Dr. Jan Van Eys and Dr. Iani Chihaia, attended BFMA’s event on behalf of USSEC, with the goal to increase awareness of U.S. Soy’s sustainability and followed up with the recent Bunge import of U.S. soybean meal to Constantza Port. Alex Doring, the general secretary of FEFAC, was invited to join the USSEC team.

Alexader Doring of FEFAC introduces the sustainability for responsible sourcing in the European Feed Industry

 

Following the opening of the event, Mr. Doring presented “FEFAC Vision 2030 on Sustainable Feed and Livestock Production –Working Priorities for 2017,” followed by Dr. Jan van Eys, who gave the paper “Sustainability Of U.S. Soy Production and Nutritional Considerations of Second Generation Soy Products.” The topics presented by the USSEC team triggered a lively question and answer session focused on the sustainability of soy and soy products versus other vegetal protein sources.

Dr. Jan van Eys presented the U.S. Soybean Sustainability Protocol in front of more than 90 Bulgarian feed and livestock industries delegates

 

There were ample interaction opportunities between participants and USSEC consultant Dr. Jan van Eys

 

By the end of the conference, the main ag TV channel in Bulgaria, Agro TV interviewed the USSEC delegation.

Dr. van Eys and Mr. Doring were interviewed during the conference by a crew of journalists from AGRO TV, the most important ag channel in Bulgaria

 

 

BFMA’s conference provided plenty of opportunities this year to meet with the Bulgarian feed representative as well as with representatives of the feed industry of surrounding countries. The attendees of this annual meeting represented all aspects of livestock (feed) production. This allowed for a broad but thorough and lasting representation of USSEC and its objectives.

Near future development of the industrial animal production in Bulgaria will enhance demand for imported ingredients of superior quality and quality feed. As such, USSEC’s continued involvement and support will likely pay off in greater export potential mid-term.

 

USSEC Facilitates Interactions Between FEFAC, Bulgarian Food Safety Agency

Monday, May 8, 2017
Category Animal Utilization Greater Europe 
In an effort to increase awareness of U.S. Soy and pave the way for future U.S. Soy imports and the sustainable feed industry, a USSEC delegation visiting Bulgaria during…

In an effort to increase awareness of U.S. Soy and pave the way for future U.S. Soy imports and the sustainable feed industry, a USSEC delegation visiting Bulgaria during the month of April benefited from the unparalleled support of the Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) in Sofia and organized a meeting with the Bulgarian Food Safety Agency (BFSA), an integrated government body that combines feed and food regulations and animal health under the Ministry of Agriculture.

USSEC – FAS – FEFAC delegation meets with BFSA’s leaders at its headquarters in Sofia, Bulgaria. (L to R): Dr. Jan van Eys (USSEC), Mila Boshnakova (FAS- Sofia), Dr. Georgi Chobanov (BFSA), Alexander Doring (FEFAC), Dr. Petya Petkova Ivanova (BFSA), Dr. Penka Maneva Kaneva (BFSA,) and Iani Chihaia (USSEC)

 

Established in early 2011, BFSA follows the best European practices for the implementation of highest standards of controls in the areas of safety and quality of food, food and feed additives, veterinary medicine and animal welfare, and feed safety.

The USSEC – FAS – European Feed Industry Federation (FEFAC) delegation was received at BFSA by Dr. Petya Petkova Ivanova, deputy executive director; Dr. Penka Maneva Kaneva, head of the feed control department; and Dr. Georgi Chobanov, director of the animal health division. The delegation had the opportunity to discuss and learn the latest details of EU regulations and discussed how these affect Bulgaria. Major progress has been made towards application and the contribution of the relatively young Bulgarian agency was discussed.

The presence of FEFAC’s Alexander Döring during the visit to BFSA opened additional, significant opportunities in terms of future meetings with government and feed industry representatives, as well as synergistic action in the Bulgarian and larger EU region. Closer cooperation between FEFAC and BFSA’s involvement in future general meetings was also discussed.

Feedback from BFSA representatives was extremely positive, laying the basis for future contacts and collaboration. The interest and potential of U.S. Soy was clearly put forward and was well accepted. Due to the established relationships, USSEC should be able to benefit from this cooperation and position itself for enhanced, positive enforcement of its message and ultimate goal: increasing demand for U.S. Soy.

The USSEC-FAS-FEFAC delegation is welcomed by the head of the BFSA at its headquarters in Sofia, Bulgaria

USSEC Sponsors Dairy Seminar in the Netherlands for Turkish Dairy Farmers and Feed Millers

Monday, May 8, 2017
Category Animal Utilization Greater Europe 
USSEC sponsored a three-day dairy nutrition and dairy farm management seminar for Turkish dairy farmers and dairy feed producers April 11-13 at the Schothorst Feed Research…

USSEC sponsored a three-day dairy nutrition and dairy farm management seminar for Turkish dairy farmers and dairy feed producers April 11-13 at the Schothorst Feed Research Center (SFR) in Lelystad and Bergharen, Netherlands, with the goal to emphasize U.S. soybean meal quality in relation to its impact on dairy nutrition. 17 key dairy Turkish farmers and feed millers who are USSEC customers participated in this event.

 

The Netherlands is a leading country in dairy farming, and SFR is a leading research centers and is well accepted by the dairy industry. Dr. Rolf Speelman – BDM, Ivonne Kok -MSC and Ant Koopmans – DVM from SFR gave a presentation during the training about the latest developments in dairy feed evaluation systems; forage quality; nutritional strategies to improve health, fertility, milk composition, and quality; calf feeding; and the importance of soybean meal and soy products in dairy feeding. On the last day of the short course, the group visited the VetVice & Cow Signals Company for training by Dr. Joep Driessen – DVM of VetVice about cow signals and how to manage these signals for sustainable and profitable dairy farming.

 

The first short dairy course at Schothorst was very successful. Dr. Speelman focused on the importance of soybean meal and soy products in dairy farming and U.S. soybean meal quality and its effect on dairy nutrition and sustainable and profitable dairy farming.

 

 

All of the participants agreed that the event provided an excellent opportunity to update and gain new knowledge about dairy nutrition. Attendees also expressed their preference for U.S. soybean meal versus meals of other origins.

USSEC Sponsors 4th International Poultry Congress in Turkey

Monday, May 8, 2017
Category Animal Utilization Greater Europe 
USSEC – Turkey sponsored the 4th International Poultry Congress in Antalya, Turkey, held April 26 – 30. The International Poultry Congress 2017 brought…

USSEC – Turkey sponsored the 4th International Poultry Congress in Antalya, Turkey, held April 26 – 30. The International Poultry Congress 2017 brought together 1573 participants from 26 different countries, including family members, and approximately 1200 active national and international participants. The Turkish poultry industry has become the world’s eighth largest poultry producer and one of the most important exporters of poultry products in the Middle East.

Each year, the Turkish Poultry Producers Association (BESD-BIR) expects many distinguished scientists and experts to participate in this congress, covering all aspects of poultry meat production from farm to fork, including new production and processing technologies; challenges and strategies for the future; safety of poultry meat; sustainability; the importance of poultry meat for human nutrition; and supplying enough animal protein for the growing world population.

USSEC Country Representative – Turkey Sirri Kayhan attended the congress as a representative of USSEC. Mr. Kayhan discussed current and future problems in the industry, talked about sustainability and GMO issues, and promoted U.S. Soy to the poultry industry representatives.

The U.S. Grains Council (USGC), U.S. Ag Attaché, and U.S. Embassy Ag Specialists also participated in the congress.

U.S. Soybean Meal Imports Delivered in April to Constantza Port for Romanian and Bulgarian Customers

Monday, May 1, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
During the month of April, 30,000 metric tons (MT) of U.S. soybean meal arrived in Constantza Port (Romania) for Romanian and Bulgarian customers. The imports, made by…

During the month of April, 30,000 metric tons (MT) of U.S. soybean meal arrived in Constantza Port (Romania) for Romanian and Bulgarian customers. The imports, made by Bunge Romania, are worth over $14 million. Due to geographic proximity, 70,000 MT of U.S. soybean meal was loaded at the Port of New Orleans and delivered first to Istanbul, Turkey, where more than half of the load was left, before reaching the final destination, Constantza Port, the largest port on the Black Sea.

Because soybean meal is the main source of protein for the poultry and livestock feeds, the shipment was quickly unloaded and will be distributed within the next few weeks to key end users from Romania and Bulgaria.

USSEC worked closely with exporters and end users, and at the time of delivery, samples of soybean meal were collected at the port for chemical composition and amino acids profile analysis in order to establish as accurate a nutritional profile as possible of the ingredient to be used in commercial feeds. The updated ingredient matrix helped nutritionists to more easily formulate feeds, and capture the advantages of U.S. soybean meal, turning it into savings and better animal performances.

The Panamax size vessel arrived in Constanta Port, Romania on April 14 with the 30,000 MT load of U.S. soybean meal

 

The current shipment is considered to be a success by all parties involved, including the exporter and end users. Coordination, follow up, and technical support are key factors in building a preference for U.S. Soy among Romanian and Bulgarian poultry and livestock integrated companies.

Golden soybean meal is waiting to be discharged from the vessel after the ocean trip

 

In Constantza Port, the vessels are unloaded using portal crane and then the unloaded goods are transported by conveyor belts from the ship to a warehouse, exclusively dedicated to soybean meal

 

Even though they are not the largest in the European markets, the Romanian and Bulgarian feed and livestock industries have increased their production volume for three times since the 1996 year and local agricultural and animal farming sectors are on the way to be developed with EU funds. These are premises for mid and long term development of the South East European sectors and indeed, may potentially increase the demand for U.S. Soy.

USSEC Sponsors Annual Meeting of the Belgian Feed Association

Monday, May 1, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
USSEC sponsored the annual meeting and dinner of BEMEFA/APFACA, the national association of the Belgian animal feed industry, on April 27. Reflecting the bilingual…

USSEC sponsored the annual meeting and dinner of BEMEFA/APFACA, the national association of the Belgian animal feed industry, on April 27. Reflecting the bilingual mandate of public life in Belgium, BEMEFA stands for Beroepsvereniging van de mengvoederfabrikanten in Dutch and APFACA stands for Association professionelle des fabricants d’aliments composes pour animaux in French. The meeting took place at the historical Rodenbach Brewery in Roeselare, Belgium. Part of Belgium’s historic patrimony, the brewery was founded in 1836 and continues to produce one of Belgium’s most popular beers.

BEMEFA/APFACA Board Chairman Frank Decadt opened the meeting by thanking USSEC for its continued support of this event. He also took the opportunity to announce a “Save the Date” for the USSEC Belgium Country Meeting to be held in Ghent on November 21. Bob Delbecque, a well-known Belgian celebrity and facilitator, engaged the audience in an entertaining way, soliciting statements from people that covered the current hot topics in the Belgian and European feed industry, including GM, antibiotics in animal feed, changing consumer preferences, and the costs of the ever-increasing regulatory requirements. Participants asked how can they compete on the global markets when there is not a level playing field with their competitors.

The highlight of the evening, which was set up by a few comments by Mr. Delbecque, was the formal announcement of the new name of the organization. It will begin the legal and administrative process of changing its name to the Belgian Feed Association (BFA) with the process to be completed by the annual meeting in 2018. Using a name in English is common for Belgian companies who want to avoid any language related issues.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the U.S. exported $36.7 million in soybean meal to Belgium in 2016, a five-year high. USSEC’s support for this event strengthens the working relationship with the BFA, keeps U.S. Soy on the radar for the feed companies and end users, and generates a positive image for U.S. Soy.

Chairman Frank Decadt and Director General Yvan Dejaugher show the new name of the organization

Prior to the event

During the event

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Moroccan Team Attends USSEC’s 3rd Regional Dairy Nutrition & Soy Hulls Conference in Jordan

Monday, May 1, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News Middle East / North Africa 
A team of key customers from the Moroccan dairy and feed industry attended USSEC’s 3rd Regional Dairy Nutrition & Soy Hulls Conference held in Dead Sea, Jordan April…

A team of key customers from the Moroccan dairy and feed industry attended USSEC’s 3rd Regional Dairy Nutrition & Soy Hulls Conference held in Dead Sea, Jordan April 8 – 10.

The team, which was composed of the largest dairy cooperative and feed mill representatives and sales staffs of ruminant feed and milk producers, appreciated its participation in the conference, which gave the members an opportunity to learn more about herd feeding and dairy nutrition management.

The Moroccan dairy sector is composed of large regional dairy producer cooperatives and several smaller dairy coops with a total of 1.2 million cows producing 1,400 million liters of milk per year. Per capita consumption of dairy products was 42 kilograms (kg) five years ago and is projected to reach about 140 kg by 2020. The “Green Morocco Plan” sees the development of modern dairies and the consolidation of smaller units as a projected means to double dairy production by 2020. Most large beef and dairy operations are gradually moving toward integration.

The feed millers association (AFAC) has identified an opportunity in the dairy and ruminant feed for developing the ruminant compound feed market in Morocco. Ruminant compound feed production grew fivefold in the last ten years reaching one million tons in 2016 with a growing use of compound feed by the dairy sector.

Soy product (soybeans, soy hulls, soy oil, bypass proteins, etc.) usage is increasing in dairy feed sustained by a higher understanding of their nutritional supply in concentrates, as nitrogen correctors, and as part of total mix rations (TMR).

USSEC programs continue to better position U.S. Soy products in a growing ruminants feed market. Attendance of key partners to trade and technical conferences contributes to develop new business relationships with prospects for U.S. soybean products.

(Left to right) Amsaguine K., marketing director of Sofalim; Larossi-Akhrife D., head of ruminant department at Alf Sahel; Nacir O., dairy and beef producer; Moufid Y, ruminant feed sales representatives at Alf Al Mabrouk; Elmorsy M., project manager at strategy department at Copag; Zaazaa S.; sales manager at Alf Sahel; Benabdeljelil K.,USSEC consultant

USSEC Holds Poultry Disease Control and Nutrition Seminar for Romanian Veterinarians and Nutritionists

Monday, May 1, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
USSEC hosted a one-day poultry nutrition and disease control seminar on April 7 in Bucharest, Romania with the goal to emphasize the U.S. soybean meal quality, in relation…

USSEC hosted a one-day poultry nutrition and disease control seminar on April 7 in Bucharest, Romania with the goal to emphasize the U.S. soybean meal quality, in relation to its impact on nutritional diseases, such as rapid passage syndrome. Over 40 key customers participated in this event.

Dr. Richard Miles, professor emeritus of poultry nutrition, University of Florida, and Dr. Gary Butcher, professor of poultry diseases, University of Florida, visited Romania during the first week of April to meet with Romanian professionals.

Drs. Miles and Butcher accepted the invitation to visit Romania again, a country where several years ago, the two U.S. professors made an important contribution in educating young poultry professionals. In 2007, a group of 10 Romanians had attended a short course in poultry nutrition and disease control at the University of Florida, supported by the U.S. Soy industry. Currently, over 80 percent of the team trained in the U.S. hold key positions at commercial poultry farms in Romania and implementing the knowledge gained. The former short course speakers and participants had the chance to meet again in Romania, thanks to USSEC.

Old and new industry friends had the chance to meet at the USSEC event organized at the Intercontinental Hotel in Bucharest

 

The conference began with a warm welcome for the professors and customers. Dr. Miles’s presentations focused on the importance of early nutrition of modern broilers and on the bird’s gastrointestinal tract development, in relation to U.S. soybean meal quality. The Rapid Passage Syndrome paper was also greatly appreciated, and the audience had many opportunities to interact with Dr. Miles about similar situations occurring in their broiler flocks.

Dr. Butcher’s paper on the use of antibiotics in poultry production and regulations in the EU and the U.S. was the hit of the seminar, inviting the participants to reevaluate current world trends regarding the elimination of antibiotics and the outcomes in the EU.

The participants agreed that the event provided an excellent opportunity to update and gain new knowledge about poultry nutritional related diseases and expressed their preference for U.S. soybean meal versus meals of other origins.

Dr. Richard Miles emphasizes the importance of heating time in soybean meal processing

 

Field data by laboratory experiments presented by Dr. Miles

 

Over 40 professionals listened with topics of high interest for the world poultry industry presented by Dr. Gary Butcher

The program included detailed presentations on Rapid Passage Syndrome for broilers and interactive discussions on soybean meal quality

 

USSEC Provides Technical Assistance for Romanian and Bulgarian U.S. Soybean Meal Customers

Monday, May 1, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News Middle East / North Africa 
During the first week of April, a team of poultry nutrition and disease control consultants, consisting of Dr. Richard Miles, professor emeritus of poultry nutrition…

During the first week of April, a team of poultry nutrition and disease control consultants, consisting of Dr. Richard Miles, professor emeritus of poultry nutrition at the University of Florida, and Dr. Gary Butcher, professor of poultry diseases at the University of Florida, visited Romania to provide technical assistance to U.S. soybean meal customers from Romania and Bulgaria. USSEC Animal Utilization Consultant – Romania Dr. Iani Chihaia escorted the visitors.

Dr. Miles and Dr. Butcher met with Vis Campi’s owner, Eda Kizilcelik, and her young team managing the broiler farms in Amaru, southern Romania

 

For three full days, the team of consultants met with key broiler integrations from southern Romania and northern Bulgaria to learn about the current status of poultry diseases in the region and offer recommendations in preventing the most critical threat to the worldwide poultry industry, avian influenza. Dr. Miles emphasized the importance of soybean meal quality for modern broilers and how U.S. Soy creates advantages for the broiler farming industry.

USSEC consultants Drs. Miles and Butcher visited with leading poultry companies in Romania and Bulgaria

 

Poultry necropsy techniques were demonstrated by Dr. Butcher and Dr. Miles in front of the broiler farms managers, veterinarians and nutritionists

 

Broiler house management, poultry necropsy techniques, and the reasons for vaccination failure were discussed during onsite sessions organized at the farms for the customers’ technical teams. Young professionals both enjoyed and benefited from the meetings with the U.S. experts and asked for future trainings conducted by Drs. Miles and Butcher.

Onsite session on poultry management, nutrition, and disease control was held at Vis Campi Farms, a state of the art broiler farm in Romania

 

Although their industries are still considered small, Romania and Bulgaria’s poultry farming sectors have made significant progress during the past decade in both volume and technical performances, enabling them to compete with important European players, making the two countries’ industries valued and reliable customers for U.S. Soy. Offering technical support in the field of nutrition and disease control is creating a win-win relationship between exporters and the growing southeast European poultry industry.

 

Article on Digestibility of U.S. Soybean Meal Featured in Journal of Animal Science

Monday, April 24, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News 
An article co-written by USSEC consultant and professor of animal nutrition at the University of Illinois, Dr. Hans H. Stein, was published in early April in the Journal…

An article co-written by USSEC consultant and professor of animal nutrition at the University of Illinois, Dr. Hans H. Stein, was published in early April in the Journal of Animal Science.

The article, “Chemical Composition and Amino Acid Digestibility of Soybean Meal Produced in the United States, China, Argentina, Brazil, or India,” written by Vanessa Lagos, Ph. D. student in the Stein Monogastric Nutrition Laboratory, and Dr. Stein, reported the results of a case study on the effects of origin of soybean meal on the digestibility of amino acids. The study, “Ileal Digestibility of Soybean Meal in Swine,” was funded by USSEC and the Indiana Soybean Alliance.

Dr. Stein concluded his study in July 2016 and discussed his methodology and results at the 2016 U.S. Soy Global Trade Exchange. His team analyzed digestible, metabolizable energy by analyzing the feces and urine of pigs.

“The most expensive part of the diet is the energy,” Dr. Stein stated.

The study showed that U.S. soybean meal had more digestible amino acids than that of other origins, and that soybean meal from the U.S. has greater digestibility and less variability in composition and digestibility.

Please click here to listen to the presentation by Ms. Lagos at American Society of Animal Science from the home page of Dr. Stein’s lab. Also, you can see only the abstract and a table of standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of amino acids in soybean meal from different countries at this link.

To read the article in its entirety, please follow this link: Stein pig digestibility jas-95-4-1626 (1)

USSEC Speaks to Polish Industry Leaders on Present and Future Use of Biotechnology in Global and European Agriculture

Monday, April 24, 2017
Category Animal Utilization Biotechnology General News Greater Europe 
For more than two decades, the Polish Grain & Feed Chamber has been one of the most influential industry associations in Poland. The organization is also very active…

For more than two decades, the Polish Grain & Feed Chamber has been one of the most influential industry associations in Poland. The organization is also very active in Europe through its membership in the European Feed Industry Federation (FEFAC), the European grain industry lobby group (COCERAL), and, most recently, the European Commodities Exchange. The U.S. Soy industry has long worked with the Chamber on many issues, including channeling professional know-how to the Polish grain, feed, livestock and food industries.

On April 21, when the Chamber held its general assembly of members in Warsaw, USSEC brought Beat Spaeth, EuropaBio, director of Green Biotechnology, to speak to this audience on “The Present and Future of Biotechnology in Global & European Agriculture and Food Chain.” Mr. Spaeth explained the massive adoption of biotech crops in the world: in 2015, 18 million farmers in 28 countries planted biotech crops on 179.7 million hectares (approximately 444 million acres), which is just a marginal decline since 2014, despite furious attacks from opponents. “Could 18 million farmers be wrong about this new technology?” the speaker asked the Polish audience.

Beat Spaeth (left) began by explaining how the association of biotech companies he represents is funded, organized and run; Jerzy W. Kosieradzki, USSEC – Northeast Europe, helped with translation

 

Speaking about the benefits that biotech crops and their derivatives offer to farmers and consumers, Mr. Spaeth highlighted the sustainability aspect of green biotechnology: production of more food on less land, reduced inputs use, reduced soil erosion, and lower CO2 emissions. The events that are in the public research institutions’ and the biotech industry’s pipeline will bring more benefits, such as resistance to new diseases, better insect and weed control, tolerance of drought and salty conditions, higher nitrogen use efficiency, better livestock feed efficiency and improved biofuel traits. The speaker stressed the consumer benefits, especially more healthy edible oils and enhanced nutritional value.

Among the audience, there were top managers of commodity trading companies, major feed compounders, livestock integrators, grain warehousing and processing entities

 

Commenting on the attitude to green biotechnology and regulatory practices in the EU, Mr. Spaeth pointed to the common hypocrisy at both Brussels’ and member states’ levels, namely stated support to innovation in agriculture and practiced expelling innovation by delaying authorization for imports, blocking applications for cultivation, and the sharp reduction of field trials. These actions cause the commercial biotech pipelines to focus not on Europe, but on other continents.

Biotechnology has an amazing potential to help farmers, processors, and consumers around the world. Mr. Spaeth and Mr. Kosieradzki at work at the Polish industry meeting.

 

USSEC Technical Director – Northeast Europe Jerzy W. Kosieradzki thanked the Polish professional audience and the leaders of the Polish Grain & Feed Chamber for taking the lead in the local battle for extension of the moratorium on implementation of the Polish legal ban on GM feeds that was partially successful. The date of the ban’s implementation was set for January 1, 2019, not 2021, as the industry originally proposed.

Mirosław Marciniak, InfoGrain, who was the second speaker, provided his company’s information on winter survival of grains and oilseeds in Poland following up with a forecast for local and European markets in 2016/17 and 2017/18.