Middle East / North Africa

The MENA region is home to 380 million people or 6 percent of the global population. The regional GDP is 4.5 percent of the world’s GDP with wide geographic swings. The countries of Egypt, Tunisia, Morocco, Saudi Arabia and Israel import over 150,000 metric tons of U.S. Soy and the region represents 4 percent of total U.S. Soy exports.

Egypt is the most important market for the U.S. Soy industry in the region as it approaches 1 million tons of imported U.S. Soy. The Egyptian crush industry continues to show strong growth with several local crush plants expanding and in some cases doubling their production. The Egyptian poultry industry remains strong along with the aquaculture industry, which now produces over 1 MMT annually with tilapia as the primary species. Soy extrusion and full-fat soymeal production is increasing throughout the region and Saudi Arabia’s poultry and dairy industry is very strong.

The North Africa countries of Egypt, Tunisia, Morocco, and Algeria were the fastest growing feed industry in the world by percentage last year despite ongoing challenges in the region.

USSEC and the U.S. Soy industry have faced some operational interruptions in this region due to ongoing conflicts in several countries. The region also faces some challenges with poultry disease issues, specifically in Egypt and Tunisia. Yet investments in animal agriculture and infrastructure are ongoing with significant investments in soy crushing/extrusion, soy oil refining and port infrastructure in Egypt and other countries. Investments in poultry, dairy, aquaculture and feed production are also occurring throughout the region even as government/social transitions continue. Regional markets for soybeans, soy oil and soybean meal are all considered as growing by USSEC.

map_ASC

Middle East / North Africa Directory

Brent Babb

Regional Director Greater Europe and Middle East / North Africa (MENA)

16305 Swingley Ridge Road, Suite 200
Chesterfield, MO  63017

Joe Mast

Project Manager, Greater Europe and Middle East / North Africa

Mousa Wakileh

Contractor, Middle East

Khalid Benabdeljelil

Contractor, North Africa

Salah Taher

Egypt - Country Representative

Middle East / North Africa News

USSEC Organizes Poultry Nutrition Seminar in Egypt

Monday, May 22, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News Middle East / North Africa 
USSEC, in cooperation with the Egyptian Poultry Producers Association, organized a poultry nutrition seminar in Cairo, Egypt on May 14. Dr. Craig Coon, animal nutrition professor at the University of Arkansas, gave two presentations to the Egyptian Poultry Producers Association, speaking about broiler breeder nutrition and broiler nutrition. He focused on how the breeder has […]

USSEC, in cooperation with the Egyptian Poultry Producers Association, organized a poultry nutrition seminar in Cairo, Egypt on May 14.

Dr. Craig Coon, animal nutrition professor at the University of Arkansas, gave two presentations to the Egyptian Poultry Producers Association, speaking about broiler breeder nutrition and broiler nutrition. He focused on how the breeder has changed over the past 25 years, discussing some of the nutrition and reproduction problems that occurred in the 90s, comparing them to some of the main issues of concern with the modern breeder. Dr. Coon’s students have generated data on breeders over the past 20 years and he discussed some of the key biological concepts that his students have developed.

A key phenomenon that has been uncovered is how protein turnover changes are linked to body composition in the pullet and breeder hen in production. The breeder dramatically decreases the fractional protein synthesis rate in breast and leg muscles at sexual maturity and elevates fractional protein breakdown rates. The breeder loses lean mass from peak production through 40 weeks and then gains lean mass from 45 to 65 weeks. The breeder supplements the feed nutrients with the breakdown of body skeletal protein during the early production period from sexual maturity to 37 weeks and then switches fuel and mobilizes body fat during the last portion of production (45 to 65 weeks). The breeders were also evaluated in metabolic chambers and the data shows that the respiratory exchange rate (RER) is highest during early production with the largest decline occurring at 45 weeks. The lower RER values in breeders shows that the largest amount of body fat is used near the 45 week mark. The body fat increases in breeders from sexual maturity until 45 weeks of age and then declines from 45 to 65 weeks. A key observation is the large amount of heat produced in breeders during the last portion of production. The Arkansas team believes the increased heat production is because of the protein accretion that occurs during the late production period. Dr. Coon thinks that future feeding systems for breeders will need to account for the protein accretion that is occurring in breeders. The maintenance requirement of broiler breeders is much larger than the requirement for daily egg production or weight gain and the requirement will continue to increase with the added protein accretion in the modern breeder.

In the second presentation, Dr. Coon discussed the response of the modern broiler to dietary amino acids and energy. The University of Arkansas team has worked with Evonik and showed with four large feeding studies that the modern broiler responds to added amino acids above the standard requirements. The broiler improves weight gain, feed conversion ratio (FCR), processing weight, and yield with amino acids. The broiler also shows that increasing AME with lysine will improve weight and FCR, but the weight gain is primarily increased fat and not protein. Economics need to be involved in making the decision of selecting the optimum digestible lysine:Mcal for your market. Dr. Coon and group have also been evaluating NE while feeding increased amino acid concentration with same energy density and also looked at NE when adding dietary energy with same amino acid concentration. Additionally, the Arkansas group has been evaluating different nutritional programs for the heavy broiler during the 42-56 day period. Dr. Coon talked about white striping and woody breast problems that may occur with the larger broilers.

Dr. Coon was very effective in presenting his technical messages to the audience. In attendance were 35 high-level management and industry participants from Egypt.

Seminar participants

 

A few seminar participants

 

Dr. Craig Coon speaks to attendees

 

 

USSEC Holds 3rd Advanced Training Program for MENA Veterinarians

Monday, May 22, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News Middle East / North Africa 
USSEC’s 3rd Annual Advanced Training Program for Veterinarians from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) was held at the University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine, in Gainesville, Florida from May 15- 19. 22 industry-leading veterinarians from the poultry industries of Egypt, Morocco, Tunisia, and Turkey participated in this educational program. Presentations focused on […]

USSEC’s 3rd Annual Advanced Training Program for Veterinarians from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) was held at the University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine, in Gainesville, Florida from May 15- 19. 22 industry-leading veterinarians from the poultry industries of Egypt, Morocco, Tunisia, and Turkey participated in this educational program.

Presentations focused on practical application involving vaccination, disease control, and management in commercial poultry. This forum stimulated considerable discussions among the veterinarians from the different countries and provided ample opportunity for the exchange of ideas.

USSEC again has played a leading role in providing technical support for the MENA region’s commercial poultry industry.

Group picture

 

Participants at the training program

 

Some participants at the training program

USSEC Maghreb Trade Team Visits U.S.

Monday, May 22, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News Middle East / North Africa 
USSEC Middle East – North Africa (MENA) recently organized a trade team visit composed of leading animal industry representatives from main Maghreb companies to the U.S. The objective was to show the strength, reliability, and sustainability of the U.S. soybean value chain from fields to port facility. Improving knowledge of the U.S. soybean value chain […]

USSEC Middle East – North Africa (MENA) recently organized a trade team visit composed of leading animal industry representatives from main Maghreb companies to the U.S. The objective was to show the strength, reliability, and sustainability of the U.S. soybean value chain from fields to port facility.

Improving knowledge of the U.S. soybean value chain and highlighting the advantages of U.S. soybean meal were other targets of the visit, as assisting participating customers to meet soy suppliers and allied industries to ultimately build opportunities for the U.S. soybean products trade.

Khalid Benabdeljelil, USSEC consultant – Morocco, escorted the Maghreb team of nine customers from Morocco and two from Tunisia. The team, composed of a crusher, feed mill purchasing makers, and integrators, had the opportunity to meet with U.S. suppliers and allied industries.

The visit to CHS facilities in Morris, Minnesota was for most team members a first time visit to loading facilities, where they discussed logistics in the U.S., transport time, loading, and exporting processes. R.J. O’Brien updated the team on the company’s activities, providing insights and outlook on soy business worldwide.

Perdue company representatives discussed their activities in relation to U.S. soybeans, sourcing, the flexibility of shipping through the port at Norfolk, Virginia, the numerous possibilities offered at their location, and their supplies to the two important Maghreb markets.

The visit to Thionville Laboratories covered specific interests expressed by customers. The president of the company extended a warm welcome to the team and explained technical aspects of surveying, its advantages conditions, and requirements. Laboratory staff discussed analytical issues regarding sampling procedures, analytical methods, equipment and resources available.

Meetings and visits at RMG provided visiting customers with first-hand exposure on the advantages of U.S. Soy in relation to infrastructure, transportation, and logistics assuring on time deliveries of high quality products.

Participants had the opportunity to interact with USSEC member firms and discuss their specific supply issues and interests in-depth, covering key aspects of soybean meal, products, exports, technical, trade, and marketing.

The trip was a great success with the team expressing their appreciation to USSEC and all the companies and firms visited. Customers from the two markets, who are all users of U.S. soybean meal and other soy products in their operations, learned more about the U.S. soybean value chain, its sustainability, and the advantages of U.S. soybean meal, which offered an opportunity to continue to build a preference for U.S. Soy.

Visit and discussions at CHS Morris loading facility

 

Visit and discussions at CHS Morris loading facility

 

Visit and discussions at CHS Morris loading facility

 

Thomas Russell with the team at RMG headquarters

 

Visit at Perdue Company

 

Visit at Thionville laboratory

 

Visit at Eurofins Laboratory

 

Visit at Thionville laboratory

 

Visit at Eurofins Laboratory

USSEC Publishes Biosecurity Guide for MENA Commercial Poultry Production

Monday, May 22, 2017
Category Animal Utilization General News Middle East / North Africa 
USSEC recently published a biosecurity guide for commercial poultry production in the Middle East and North Africa in English, French, and Arabic. The guide aims to provide farmers with the information they need to implement a successful biosecurity program, which will enable farmers to control and eliminate diseases that are currently devastating the poultry industry. […]

USSEC recently published a biosecurity guide for commercial poultry production in the Middle East and North Africa in English, French, and Arabic. The guide aims to provide farmers with the information they need to implement a successful biosecurity program, which will enable farmers to control and eliminate diseases that are currently devastating the poultry industry.

Over the past 20 years, the commercial poultry industry has grown tremendously worldwide. Due to chicken’s versatility as a food, consumption has increased, and it is lower priced and considered a healthier choice as compared to other meats. As the poultry industry has rapidly expanded, however, diseases have become more common and increasingly costly.

In many regions of the world, diseases in the commercial poultry industry have resulted in devastating losses and companies have been forced to rely on increasing amounts of vaccines and antibiotics to control these losses. In recent years, several diseases, including a variant Newcastle disease and several types of avian influenza, have become endemic, resulting in substantial deficits.

The success of the poultry industry depends on improved performance. This will allow the industry to continue to grow and increase its demand for soybeans.

Please use the links below to access the guides:

Biosecurity Guide ENGLISH BR 27

Biosecurity Guide FRENCH 12

Biosecurity Guide Arabic 17

USSEC Hosts Seminar on Least Cost Aquafeed Formulation and Feed Manufacturing in Egypt

Monday, May 15, 2017
Category Aquaculture General News Middle East / North Africa 
USSEC hosted its annual seminar on cost effective aquafeed formulations and aquafeed manufacturing in Egypt. A total of 80 participants attended the event, representing the top aquaculture feed mills and aqua producers. Bret Tate, U.S. Agricultural Attaché – Cairo, opened the seminar. In his opening speech, Mr. Tate pointed out the importance of the agricultural […]

USSEC hosted its annual seminar on cost effective aquafeed formulations and aquafeed manufacturing in Egypt. A total of 80 participants attended the event, representing the top aquaculture feed mills and aqua producers.

Bret Tate, U.S. Agricultural Attaché – Cairo, opened the seminar. In his opening speech, Mr. Tate pointed out the importance of the agricultural and trade relationships between Egypt and the United States and stressed the win-win opportunity presented by the aquaculture industry, which utilizes large quantities of soy.

Egypt imports approximately 4 million metric tons (MMT) of soy, mainly soybeans along with some soybean meal. Historically, 50 percent of the beans are of U.S. origin.

During the week of the seminar, the USSEC team conducted one-on-one industry visits with aqua feed mills to provide the necessary support for adoption of least cost formulation and the benefits that arise from formulating with U.S. Soy.

USSEC consultant Tim O’Keefe, keynote speaker at the event, praised the sequence of the seminar. The morning session provided an opportunity for the participants to gain an understanding of the nutritional requirements of tilapia. The session that followed was delivered by USSEC Regional Project Manager – EU / (Middle East – North Africa (MENA) Sirri Kayan, who provided participants with the opportunity to apply that knowledge using an interactive model that allowed them to share in the formulation process. The participants helped in formulating a number of diets while applying different ingredients on least cost software to demonstrate the value of U.S. Soy.

Guest speaker Dr. G. Ramesh of Wenger delivered a presentation on the manufacturing process of marine diets and the new developments in the area of marine diet formulation. The presentation revolved around the critical factors in marine diet formulation including the high inclusion rates of fat and the ability of different types of equipment to handle fat inclusion rates including, single screw extruders and double screw as well as the advantages of high intensity pre conditioner. He applauded the level of interaction and interest of the participants, saying they were “reactive, very interested, and highly engaged. Clearly the aquaculture industry is growing rapidly.”

Ned Williams from Ever-Extruder spoke about the background and history of his company and Carbide technology advantages and industries. Mr. Williams also presented new and innovative technology for dyes, knives, drive hubs, extruder alignment, and support for high efficacy and SSDS innovation for real time density control. Mr. Williams commented that this seminar and similar USSEC activities that take part around the world is truly a global effort on the part of USSEC and provides the opportunity for global exposure for U.S. companies seeking international markets.

Hussein Mansour of Aller Aqua delivered the final presentation of the seminar. His presentation revolved around future perspectives in the Egyptian aqua industry, mainly the complete replacement of fishmeal by soy in tilapia diets, as well as the global trend of aquaculture as a replacement of wild catch. Mr. Hussein also explained the importance of fish protein for the Egyptian market. Current per capita consumption is almost 21 kilograms (kg). He added that while Egypt is one of the top producers in the world of aquaculture products, most of the fish is sold on the spot market; Mr. Hussein explained that in the future, processing will play a major role in the development of the industry. During his presentation, he explained the importance of increased customer awareness of the quality of farmed tilapia and the initiative that is currently being adopted by the industry to produce a generic brand under the name Egyptian Tilapia.