U.S. Soy is Open for Business

By - Monday, April 20, 2020

As COVID-19 continues to impact the majority of the world, we continue to support the U.S. soy industry and the diligent people responsible for producing and marketing the highest quality food, fiber, fuel and resources on the planet. As farmers are preparing to plant the 2020 soybean crop, suppliers and exporters continue to sell soy products around the globe. With the help of one another, we’re working to ensure business remains active and available to all those interested in U.S. Soy.

USSEC will be providing regular updates to this page including resources, industry updates, events and opportunities, and various items highlighting how U.S. Soy remains committed to supporting a growing world.

We’re here to support your soy needs.

If you have any questions or comments, do not hesitate to reach out to Eric Gibson, Industry Relations Manager at USSEC: egibson@ussec.org.

Are you interested in buying U.S. soy? Click here

April 21 Updates

More than 80 Countries Convene Virtually to Learn How U.S. Soy is Ready to Deliver, by USSEC Staff

To sustain and grow relationships between U.S. soybean farmers and international customers the U.S. Soybean Export Council virtually hosted The U.S. Soy Connection: Global Digital Conference and Situation Report on April 14-15. This week the U.S. Soybean Export Council (USSEC) hosted more than 1,600 global customers and soybean industry representatives from 84 countries… Click here to read the full story.

USSEC China Aquaculture Program Conducted Its First Webinar to Promote SSAP & BAP, by Jen Del Carmen, USSEC

USSEC continues to leverage its virtual communications during to the COVID-19 pandemic. On April 9, USSEC’s China Aquaculture Program conducted its first webinar on the promotion of the U.S. Soy Sustainability Assurance Protocol (SSAP) and Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP)… Click here to read the full story.

April 20 Updates

Why the Digital Divide Matters to All of Us, Right Now, by Polly Ruhland, United Soybean Board

Even for the most fortunate of us, the past few weeks have been a period of dramatic disruption. Like many, I am adjusting to new work environments, communications tools and daytime routines. But I feel incredibly privileged to have the tools I need to maintain productivity as I do my small part to help flatten the curve… Click here to read the full story.

Be sure to follow @USSOY and @USSEC on Twitter.

April 17 Updates

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April 16 Updates

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April 15 Updates

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April 14 Updates

U.S. Soy is Open for Business, by Lisa Humphreys, United Soybean Board

During these uncertain times, the U.S. soy industry is hard at work. All parts of the U.S. value chain, including farmers, grain handlers, food processors, manufacturers and exporters, are working to ensure a safe, sustainable, and dependable supply of food for communities around the world. This video from the U.S. Soybean Export Council (USSEC) explains how the U.S. soy industry is working to ensure a reliable supply chain during the COVID-19 pandemic… Click here to read the full story.

U.S. Soybean Suppliers Poised to Overcome Challenges from COVID-19, Rob Hatchett, Doane Advisory Board

The recent spread of the novel coronavirus, whose resulting disease has become known as COVID-19, has directly impacted people in all corners of the world since it surfaced in the Wuhan province of China and began spreading earlier this year. The ramifications have been seen in global equity and commodity markets as investors have responded to economic developments and sought safe assets. In this piece, we will take a fact-based approach to highlight many of the impacts on markets around the world along with a discussion of potential implications for U.S. soybean supplies… Click here to read the full story.

Why Do Farmers Grow Soybeans? USSEC Staff Writer

U.S. soybean farmers continue to grow a reliable supply of high-quality soybeans. But why are soybeans such an important crop in the U.S. Farmer Jordan Scott, from South Dakota, in the Northern Plains of the U.S., is a 5th-generation farmer. He explains why farmers grow soybeans, including a bit of the history, agronomic value, quality, innovation and sustainability soybeans provide. (See below video from Jordan Scott)… Click here to read the full story. 

IPRS Demonstration in Vietnam Progresses Despite COVID-19, by Jen Del Carmen, USSEC

Vietnam is one of the biggest producers of pangasius in the world, producing more than 2 million metric tons (MMT) of pangasius feed utilizing more than 600,000 tons of soybean meal annually. Pangasius is primarily an export product and margins are very tight, so ensuring that targeted nutrition levels are maintained to efficiently produce a good product for market is critical. The additional ability to certify the feed as coming from sustainable ingredients, like U.S. Soy Sustainability Assurance Protocol (SSAP)-verified U.S. soybeans will further add to marketing approaches. Since 2016, USSEC has noted the potential of using U.S. soybean meal and targeting future development in Vietnam’s pangasius industry, and so USSEC has introduced the In Pond Raceway System (IPRS) to Vietnam via trainings, visits to China IPRS models, and additional sharing of knowledge and experience. In FY20, USSEC identified the correct cooperator to start the first stage of this effort with pangasius in southern Vietnam with FFIC Pangasius Farm, in collaboration with the Missouri Soybean Association (MOSOY) through the Missouri Soybean Merchandising Council (MSMC)… Click here to read the full story.

April 13 Updates

 

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April 11 Updates

Providing Sustainable Protein for Global Nutrition Needs, Part 2 of 2, by Linda Funk, Flavorful Insights

Whether consumers choose animal protein sources—such as beef, pork, and chicken—or plant-based sources such as soyfoods, protein is a vital element of nutrition and a critical part of a balanced diet. Global events such as the COVID-19 outbreak underscore the interconnectedness of world populations, and the importance of meeting shared needs. Soyfoods play a pivotal part in the safe, reliable U.S. food chain that can help feed the world. “Choose U.S. Protein First,” a global initiative to increase consumption of U.S. proteins, demonstrates the quality and versatility of soy… Click here to read the full story…. Click here to read part one.

April 10 Updates

Takeaways from March 1 Soybean Stocks, by Rob Hatchett, Doane Advisory Services

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) issued its quarterly update of U.S. grain and oilseed inventories at the end of March. These data were mostly overshadowed by continued discussions of the ongoing global COVID-19 pandemic, but the figures provide interesting insights as to the latest inventories held both on-farm and in commercial as well as potential implications for the future of the agency’s balance sheet update… Click here to read the full story.

Be sure to follow @USSOY and @USSEC on Twitter.

April 9 Updates

2020 Ground Work: Waiting for Spring in Indiana, by Tom Griffiths, United Soybean Board Director and Soybean Farmer

We’ve had a cool, wet spring so far. In fact, this is what it looked like near the end of March. And though that snow has melted now, more rain is in the forecast. That means my fields are extremely saturated, so I am not able to get any field preparation done… Click here to read the full story.

April 8 Updates

USSEC’s Boots on the Ground Keep Marching (Virtually), by George Harper, United Soybean Board

In the midst of the global COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. Soybean Export Council (USSEC) remains hard at work. In U.S. soy markets around the world, the organization’s teams, which USSEC CEO Jim Sutter often refers to as “boots on the ground,” have continued to stay engaged with key audience stakeholders… Click here to read the full story.

USSEC Debuts Virtual Marketing Event in China, by Jen Del Carmen, USSEC

To continue market and trade service and maintain its partnership with the Chinese industry, USSEC China launched its first ever webinars on April 1 and 3. Virtual meetings such as these provide an alternative approach for China’s importers and buyers of U.S. Soy during the COVID-19 pandemic. The webinars attracted nearly 240 attendees from more than 80 companies representing soybean importers, crushers, feed millers, and animal integrators, many of whom organized their marketing and procurement teams to attend the webinars in their meeting rooms, helping USSEC to reach a much broader industry audience… Click here to read the full story.

Chinese Food Bean Customers Participate in USSEC Webinar, by Jen Del Carmen, USSEC

On April 2, USSEC China organized a food bean webinar, “U.S. Soy Solutions for Specialty Soy Food Products and Purchasing Decision Recommendations for U.S. Soy Importers/Buyers.” The webinar is part of USSEC’s initiative to stay virtually connected with its customers during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Bean Produce Committee of the China Food Industry Association and the Shanghai Bean Products Association provided support for this invitation-only digital event, which had 63 total meeting participants, including 10 live attendees… Click here to read the full story.

April 7 Updates

U.S. Ag Exports Continue During Pandemic, by Jen Del Carmen, USSEC

The novel coronavirus COVID-19 has slowed many industries in recent months. But U.S. farmers continue to grow a reliable supply of agricultural commodities – including soybeans. And the U.S. transportation and export system continues to reliably ship those commodities to customers around the world… Click here to read the full story.

April 6 Updates

U.S. Soy Industry Strives to Maintain Export Channels, Supply Chain of High Quality Soy amidst COVID-19 Concerns, by John Baize, John Baize and Associates

Despite the expanding cases of COVID-19 in the United States, the U.S. soybean industry continues to operate at near full capacity. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has classified the food and agriculture sectors as essential infrastructure and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) continues working to ensure access, resources and safety are prioritized. U.S. railroads, barge operations, trucking companies and other necessary infrastructure and logistical support remain functioning at full capacity to support the ongoing efforts by soybean processors, agricultural export facilities, grain inspectors and U.S. soybean farmers… Click here to read the full story.

Be sure to follow @USSOY and @USSEC on Twitter.

April 4 Updates

February Crush Data Supports Higher Forecasts, by Rob Hatchett, Doane Advisory Services

The National Oilseed Processor Association (NOPA) issued February soybean crush data on Monday, March 16th. According to the data, NOPA member soybean processing in the fifth month of the 2019/20 product (October-September) marketing year totaled 4.526 million tonnes. This was a modest decline from the record January total of 4.815 million tonnes as February included two fewer days. On a daily basis, February processing rates were record large for a second-consecutive month. Cumulative crushings of 23.360 million tonnes are up 2.5% from 22.784 million the same period last year… Click here to read the full story.

April 3 Updates

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April 1 Updates

USSEC Hosts Webex Call to Discuss Impacts of COVID-19 on Soybeans, by Jennifer Del Carmen, USSEC

More than 150 U.S. soy stakeholders from every part of the soy value chain participated in a WebEx call on March 31 to discuss the impact of the global COVID-19 pandemic on the global soy industry as USSEC works to engage the use of technology to reach broad audiences… Click here to read the full story.

March 31 Updates

Providing Sustainable Protein for Global Nutrition Needs (Part 1 of 2), by Linda Funk, Flavorful Insights

Whether consumers choose animal protein sources—such as beef, pork and chicken—or plant-based sources such as soyfoods, protein is a vital element of nutrition and a critical part of a balanced diet. Global events such as the COVID-19 outbreak underscore the interconnectedness of world populations, and the importance of meeting shared needs. Soyfoods play a pivotal part in the safe, reliable U.S. food chain that can help feed the world. “Choose U.S. Protein First,” a global initiative to increase consumption of U.S. proteins, demonstrates the quality and versatility of soy… Click here to read the full story.

In the Wake of COVID-19, U.S. Food Production System Carries On, by Mace Thornton, United Soybean Board

With the 2020 soybean planting season cranking up in parts of the country, the U.S. food production system is expected to continue to roll along without interruptions, despite the worldwide COVID-19 outbreak. Economists are forecasting 2020 as a record production year for beef, pork, and poultry… Click here to read the full story.

March 30 Updates

U.S. Agriculture Included in Critical Infrastructure During Pandemic, by Lisa Humphreys, U.S. Soybean Export Council

The U.S. government has labeled agriculture a critical industry during the novel coronavirus outbreak, according to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The designation extends to the entire food and agriculture production system.The global outbreak of COVID-19 has been labeled a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO)… Click here to read the full story.

Be sure to follow @USSOY and @USSEC on Twitter.

 

March 29 Updates

U.S. Agriculture Industry Taking Steps to Ensure Safe, Reliable Trade, by Rob Hatchett, Doane Advisory Services

As the world continues to search for ways to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, businesses across the spectrum are adopting new protocols to ensure the uninterrupted movement of fundamental products domestically and around the world. Commercial grain companies in the United States are no different, and many of the key soybean providers have ramped up their efforts to ensure safe, reliable movement of soybeans to end users around the world… Click here to read the full story.

March 28 Updates

Safe Soybeans, Hazards to Crew: How COVID-19 is Impacting Trade, by Alan Barrett, Doane Advisory Services

ProFarmer and Hellenic Shipper News reported that China’s soymeal futures are increasing as soybean crushers suspended operations due to a shortage of soybeans as the novel coronavirus and weather have delayed South American shipments. Chinese soymeal futures are currently at their highest level since October 2019, while inventories are at their lowest level since at least 2010.[1] Shipments have also been disrupted to some degree by worries that China may stop imports to prevent the spread of coronavirus from other countries. The issue is not with the safety of the soybeans, but how to handle sick crew members… Click here to read the full story.

March 27 Updates

2020 Ground Work: Fertilizing and Seed Delivery, by Cory Atkins, U.S. soybean farmer in Delaware

March has been relatively warm and dry in our area, on the U.S. east coast. If the weather holds, planting will start sooner rather than later. Though some industries have been slowed by the coronavirus, farming is continuing as planned. Our state currently has closed all non-essential businesses and has a stay-at-home order in place due to COVID-19. Although agriculture is an essential business, we continue to practice social distancing and limiting interactions when possible… Click here to read the full story

March 26 Updates

The U.S. Soy Industry is Open for Business, by Jim Sutter, USSEC CEO

As the novel coronavirus COVID-19 continues to impact so many around the world, I can say with confidence that U.S. soy farmers, the U.S Soybean Export Council (USSEC), and the industry as a whole remain committed to providing the global market with a stable supply of high-quality products and support… Click here to read the full story

Be sure to follow @USSOY and @USSEC on Twitter.

March 25 Updates

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March 25 Updates

USSEC’s Response to COVID-19, by Jim Sutter, USSEC CEO

First, we are thinking of all of those who are impacted by this virus. We are also very appreciative of our health care workers and providers around the world who are working tirelessly to keep our family and friends as healthy as possible during this time.

As the novel coronavirus COVID-19 continues to spread globally, USSEC is working to assure global stakeholders the U.S. soy industry is maintaining a stable, abundant soy supply that consistently delivers… Click here to read more.