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Description

A cooperative feeding demonstration with spotted rose snapper was conducted in 2013 between USSEC and Martec Industries S. A. at the Martec experimental aquaculture site located at Paquera in front of Isla Cedro, Puntarenas Province, Costa Rica. The objective of the demonstration was to show the feasibility of using a diet in which a feed grade soy protein concentrate (SPC) having high protein and low oligosaccharide content partially replaced fishmeal. Results of the feeding demonstration showed that inclusion of SPC NutrivanceTM at an inclusion rate up to 26.4% in the spotted rose snapper diet did not affect snapper production parameters, and that there was no difference in fish performance with the SPC diet and a commercial diet formulated with fishmeal as the primary protein source. Hence, the SPC-NutrivanceTM appears to be a potential ingredient for manufacturing aquafeeds for marine fish species.

Language
English

Date Published
October 29, 2013

Author
United States Soybean Export Council
Description

Emperor snapper (Lutjanus sebae) growth performance in coastal cages was evaluated from fingerling to sub-market size using the ASA LVHD cage production model and ASA soy-inclusion, extruded marine fish feeds. The cage trial was conducted at Ling Shui, Hainan, China. Snapper were stocked in three, 8.0-m3 cages at a density of 2,000 fish per cage (250 fish/m3). Snapper were fed to satiation daily with a 47% crude protein and 15% crude fat feed (47/15) to fish size 25 g, and with a 43% crude protein and 12% crude fat feed (43/12) from fish size >25 g. Both feeds were fed in extruded, floating pellet form. Fish in all trial cages were fed to satiation, three times daily for the first month, and twice daily thereafter. Pompano grew from 1.4 g to 77 g in 124 days of feeding. Average FCR with the combination of 47/15 and 43/12 feeds was 1.76:1. Average fish survival was 81%. Fish in one of the three trial cages were lost when raft supports were destroyed in a typhoon and the cage submerged, allowing the fish to escape. Results of the trial indicate that emperor snapper perform well on extruded feed. Growth performance and FCR were acceptable, but high cost of juvenile fish (RMB 2.3 per 1-g fish) resulted in net economic loss. Emperor snapper exhibited good potential for LVHD cage culture, but production will depend on availability of lower cost and higher quality fish.

Language
English

Date Published
October 31, 2002

Author
Michael C. Cremer, Zhang Jian and Hsiang Pin Lan
Description

Weaning of sub-market size snapper (Lutjanus sp.), locally known as red-purple snapper, from trash fish to extruded feed, followed by growout to market size on extruded feed, was demonstrated in an ASA cage trial conducted in Dong Shan Bay, Long Gang, Shenzhen. Snapper that had previously been fed with trash fish were stocked in three, 4.5-m3 cages at a density of 150 fish per m3 and weaned from trash fish to extruded feed over a period of one week. After weaning to extruded feed, snapper were fed to satiation twice daily with a 43/12 extruded, floating feed. Snapper grew from 233 g to 522 g in 118 days on the ASA feed, with an average FCR of 1.96:1. Average fish carrying capacity at harvest was 55.8 kg/m3 of cage. The average snapper survival rate was 71.3%. The approximately 29% mortality rate was attributed to fish injuries sustained during a series of typhoons in June and July. Net economic return and return on investment for the trial were RMB 727/m3 and 48.5%, respectively. Results of the trial demonstrated that Lutjanus sp. snapper could be successfully weaned from trash fish to extruded feed at a large size. Cage production of snapper was demonstrated to be technically and economically feasible with the ASA extruded feed under proper environmental conditions. The ASA 43/12 marine fish feed is formulated with 35% dehulled soybean as a partial replacement for fishmeal. The dehulled soybean meal inclusion rate is 35% by
weight. Despite a significant fish mortality rate, snapper yielded a 48.5% return to investment in this trial.

Language
English

Date Published
October 31, 2001

Author
Michael C. Cremer, Zhang Jian and Hsiang Pin Lan