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News: Southeast Asia

USSEC Helps Philippines to Develop Sustainable, High-volume, Export-focused Marine Fish Aquaculture Sector

Monday, June 5, 2017
Category Aquaculture General News Southeast Asia 
USSEC – Southeast Asia (SEA), led by Lukas Manomaitis, USSEC Aquaculture Program Lead Technical Consultant – SEA; Levy Loreto L. Manalac, USSEC Technical Consultant,…

USSEC – Southeast Asia (SEA), led by Lukas Manomaitis, USSEC Aquaculture Program Lead Technical Consultant – SEA; Levy Loreto L. Manalac, USSEC Technical Consultant, Aquaculture – Philippines; Pamudi, USSEC Technical Consultant, Aquaculture – Indonesia; and Hsiang Pin Lan, USSEC Asia Marine Specialist, Aquaculture – SEA, together with international speakers helped the Philippines to develop a sustainable, high-volume, export-focused marine fish aquaculture sector in a workshop conducted on May 8 at the Marco Polo Ortigas Hotel in Pasig City, Philippines.

According to Mr. Manomaitis, USSEC has been working with the marine fish aquaculture sector in Philippines for the past few years and anticipates that the current industry will become larger scale and will produce a large volume of marine fish products. In order for this to succeed, the industry will have to focus on extra-regional sales of product and not primarily on intra-regional trade (national or SEA regional sales). This workshop aimed to inform, educate, and discuss important topics as the Southeast Asian marine fish aquaculture industry starts to develop larger scale production.

The participants at the USSEC Workshop “Development of a Sustainable, High-volume, Export-focused Marine Fish Aquaculture Sector in Philippines” conducted on May 8 at the Marco Polo Ortigas Hotel in Pasig City, Philippines

 

During the workshop the invited resource speakers presented the following topics:

  • Roy C. Ortega, OIC of IFAD of DA-BFAR, discussed the Philippines Fishery government current policy and future policy plans for marine fish aquaculture.
  • Manomaitis provided an introduction to USSEC and discussed the seminar topic and workshop program.
  • Matt Brooker, business development manager of The Fishin’ Company in the U.S., presented requirements for a company’s entry into a marine fish export market including how a species market is developed or expanded (if already existing), format, volume, quality, certifications, and challenges and opportunities.
  • Elsie Tech, vice president South Luzon, Hi-VAP Inc. and technical consultant of Palawan Aquaculture Corp., discussed and introduced HI-VAP Inc. and how they see the marine fish industry in the next five years.
  • Pamudi gave an introduction to the ideas of standards setting and certification bodies for marine fish export market.
  • Isidor Yu, farm assurer, GlobalGAP, discussed the importance of standards and certifications for aquaculture products and for export products in particular.
  • Lourdes Tanco, managing director of MIDA Trade Ventures International Inc., talked about how Philippine marine fish producers may need to link to the processing and export industry for smooth development of the industry.

Lourdes Tanco (left), managing director of MIDA Trade Ventures International Inc. and Roy C. Ortega (right), OIC of IFAD of DA-BFAR, discuss some government certifications issues

 

This workshop was highlighted by the four different sectors in four breakout sessions where they discussed and addressed the following:

  1. Import related: What is the best way to link to markets, identify products and encourage buyers to look at SEA marine fish production?
  2. Certification related: What are the key concerns with regards to standards/certifications that may impact a move to an export marine fish aquaculture industry?
  3. Government: What actions in the short/medium/long term are needed to support an export marine fish aquaculture industry?
  4. Industry actions: What changes need to occur within the current industry to move to export volumes? How will feeds be a part of this?

Joseph Martin Borromeo, national president of Philippine Association of Fish Producers Inc. (PAFPI), presents the output of industry action plans during the break-out sessions

 

The workshop was attended by 36 marine fish farmers and company, aquaculture feedmills, seafood importers and exporters, Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources and other government agencies, members of Philippine Association of Fish Producers Inc. (PAFPI), Philippine Milkfish Industry Group Inc. (PhilMIG), High Value Aqua Philippines Inc. (Hi-VAP), fish cage manufacturers, and other aquaculture stakeholders in Philippines.

The international speakers and marine fish stakeholders that shared their insights and experiences at the workshop. (L-R) Isidor Yu (farm assurer. GlobalGAP), Scott Zimmerman (principal, SQSA), Longley Gace (president, InnovaSea), Matt Brooker (business development manager, The Fishin’ Company, U.S.A.) and David Kelly (CEO, InnovaSea)

 

USSEC Conducts In-House Seminars for Philippine Aquaculture Feedmills

Monday, May 8, 2017
Category Aquaculture Southeast Asia 
USSEC – Southeast Asia conducted in-house seminars and visits to several aquaculture feedmills in the Philippines to address different issues in their feedmill productions…

USSEC – Southeast Asia conducted in-house seminars and visits to several aquaculture feedmills in the Philippines to address different issues in their feedmill productions and aquaculture feed formulations from February 21 – 23.

Mark Newman, USSEC Feedmill and Nutrition Consultant, checks on one of the screws of the extrusion machine at Davao South Feedmill Corporation, a Vitarich Feed Corp. third party toll milling partner in producing extruded aqua feeds in Mindanao on February 21

 

Levy Loreto L. Manalac, USSEC Technical Consultant, Aquaculture – Philippines and Mark Newman, USSEC Feedmill and Nutrition Consultant, led this effort. In order to properly address each aqua feedmill issue, USSEC requested pre-questionnaires from each feedmill to guide USSEC during the in-house seminar.

Mr. Newman presents “Extrusion Principles and Equipment in Aquaculture Feed Production” and “Fish Feeds and Feeding Management” at the Philippine Foremost Milling Corp. in Manila on February 22

 

Mr. Newman presented and discussed extrusion principles and equipment in aquaculture feed production; feeds and feeding management; and milkfish and tilapia nutrition, including the use of U.S. Soy products to reduce the amount of fishmeal and fish oil in aquaculture feeds at the Davao South Feedmill Corporation (Vitarich Feed Corp. third party toll milling partner), Philippine Foremost Milling Corp., and CJ Phils.

Mr. Newman presents “Extrusion Principles and Equipment in Aquaculture Feed Production” and “Milkfish and Tilapia Nutrition” at CJ Philippines in Bulacan on February 23

 

At Santeh Feeds Corp. Mr. Newman presented and discussed nutrition and feeds for marine shrimp, processing sinking feeds for shrimp, and current manufacturing trends.

Mr. Newman presents “Nutrition and Feeds for Marine Shrimp” and “Processing Sinking Feeds for Shrimp – Current Manufacturing Trends” at Santeh Feeds Corp. in Bulacan on February 23

 

38 feedmill staff, Q&A staff, and managers from four different aquaculture feedmills in Philippines attended the in-house seminar.

Indonesia Removes Thousands Of Fish Floating Cages In Jatiluhur Reservoir

Monday, May 8, 2017
Category Aquaculture Southeast Asia 
About 15,000 of the 23,000 floating net cages (FNCs) in Jatiluhur Reservoir in Purwakarta Regency, West Java, Indonesia began to be removed early last month and will continue…

About 15,000 of the 23,000 floating net cages (FNCs) in Jatiluhur Reservoir in Purwakarta Regency, West Java, Indonesia began to be removed early last month and will continue to be removed until February 2018. The remaining cages will then be partially removed until the end of next year. An excessive number of cages, up to six times the allowable number, has been blamed for threatening the water supply for Jakarta and Java-Bali’s power supply. Purwakarta Regent Deddy Mulyadi initiated this action.

FNC aquaculture, which mostly produces common carp, started in the reservoir in 1988 and has been a dilemmatic industry in Purwakarta. With an annual production of 70,000 tons per year, involving 3,636 farm households and with a potential estimated tax of $90.2 million (USD) per year, the industry claimed to boost the local economy. However, among those cages, only 3,000 FNCs were officially registered and the registrations expired last year, while the rest were illegal, threatening the water supply and Java-Bali’s power supply.

Although many fish farmers complained about the action, they do not have any right to reject or sue the local government because they established the cages illegally and were instructed to remove them a couple years ago. The farmers now need alternative jobs to make a living. The local government has proposed that the reservoir could be an attractive tourist water spot, involving most of the former cage fish farmers to manage the spot without disrupting the reservoir’s sustainability.

USSEC’s aquaculture program has considered the Jatiluhur and other Indonesian reservoirs for sustainable, environmental-friendly aquaculture, farming the land and sustaining the sea and other water bodies.

This outdated photo documents the excessive number of floating net cages for common carp in Jatiluhur Reservoir, Purwakarta Regency, West Java