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News: Americas

USSEC’s Amezquita Presents BAP Certificates to Colombian Farmers

Monday, October 24, 2016
Category Americas Aquaculture General News 
In support of the Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) third-party certification program, USSEC Aquaculture Consultant – Americas Jairo Amezquita recently presented…

In support of the Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) third-party certification program, USSEC Aquaculture Consultant – Americas Jairo Amezquita recently presented BAP certificates to Colombian small farmers selected to receive training and financial support.

Mr. Amezquita has been a key player in ensuring that Colombia’s farmers receive the training and financial support necessary to apply for the BAP certification to comply with local and international market requirements since USSEC and the Federación Colombiana De Acuicultores (FEDEACUA) signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the Global Aquaculture Alliance (GAA) early this year.

The USSEC consultant presented a number of tilapia and trout producers with BAP certificates for attaining BAP certification at a celebration of responsible aquaculture organized by FEDEACUA in Bogota, Colombia, on October 11.

“The MoU signed by USSEC, FEDEACUA and GAA to train Colombia’s small farmers to achieve BAP certification represents an effective demonstration of responsible aquaculture in Latin America,” said Marcos Moya, manager of BAP supply development for GAA.

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USSEC Helps to Develop, Promote New Dairy Diet in Central America

Monday, October 24, 2016
Category Americas Animal Utilization General News 
Beginning in 2015, USSEC partnered with the Alcon-Cargill Company to develop a new dairy diet. USSEC Animal Utilization consultant Carlos Campabadal worked with the…

Beginning in 2015, USSEC partnered with the Alcon-Cargill Company to develop a new dairy diet.

USSEC Animal Utilization consultant Carlos Campabadal worked with the dairy nutrition staff at Cargill – Central America to develop a closing diet for the pre-partum period, which is the most important diet in a dairy feeding system. Its use increases milk production and reproduction in the next lactation and causes a reduction of metabolic diseases including milk fever, ketosis, and acidosis.

The diet was finalized at the end of February 2016, and USSEC helped to introduce it in Honduras by participating in four dairy field days, attended by 272 producers. Mr. Campabadal spoke about the importance of the closing period and also presented a conference, “The Importance of Nutrition in Cow Reproduction.” The USSEC consultant gave great emphasis to the importance of using U.S. soybean meal because of its quality and composition during all of his presentations.

The development of a new diet is a good step for USSEC because it encourages Central American dairy producers to utilize more soybean meal, and partnering with Cargill is a positive because the company purchases more than 140,000 metric tons (MT) of U.S. soybean meal, selling U.S. soybean meal to small producers that make their own feed.

Carlos Campabadal speaks about the importance of U.S. soybean meal in the closing dairy diet

Carlos Campabadal speaks about the importance of U.S. soybean meal in the closing dairy diet

 

USSEC Provides Technical Assistance To RAGASA

Monday, October 17, 2016
Category Americas Animal Utilization General News 
USSEC was asked by RAGASA, the largest U.S. soybean crushing plant in Mexico, to send its animal nutrition consultant to help them in the promotion of their soybean meal…

USSEC was asked by RAGASA, the largest U.S. soybean crushing plant in Mexico, to send its animal nutrition consultant to help them in the promotion of their soybean meal and pelleted soybean hulls in the Mexican market. RAGASA processes one million metric tons (MT) of soybeans per year and with its new crushing plant that will be ready in January 2017, the company will process two million MT of beans annually.

USSEC consultant Carlos Campabadal presents a conference on the use of pelleted soybean hulls in animal diets

USSEC consultant Carlos Campabadal presents a conference on the use of pelleted soybean hulls in animal diets

USSEC – Americas animal nutrition consultant Carlos Campabadal provided technical assistance to RAGASA. Four of Mexico’s largest swine operations, representing more than 400,000 sows; poultry operations that produce 15 million birds/cycle; and a company with 32 million laying hens, 10,000 dairy cows and 70,000 sheep were present. Various nutrition topics were discussed with the nutritionists and company owners, particularly the advantages of using of soybean meal and pelleted soybean hulls in their animal diets, due to the digestible amino acid content and high digestible fiber, respectively. Additionally, Mr. Campabadal presented a conference on the use of pelleted soybean hulls to members of ANFACA (Mexican Feed Mill Association).

 

USSEC Conducts RAPCO Feed Manufacturing Training

Monday, October 10, 2016
Category Americas Animal Utilization General News 
USSEC partnered with the International Grains Program (IGP) Institute at Kansas State University to hold the Regional Animal Production Course (RAPCO) in feed manufacturing.…
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USSEC partnered with the International Grains Program (IGP) Institute at Kansas State University to hold the Regional Animal Production Course (RAPCO) in feed manufacturing. 30 feed mill staff, nutritionists, and quality control technicians from 9 different Latin American countries traveled to the IGP Institute from September 6 – 9.

“The IGP-KSU partnership with USSEC continues the technical program under RAPCO that helps Latin Americans who import U.S. soybeans and soybean meal to better understand and utilize its nutritional benefits,” says Carlos Campabadal, course coordinator and feed manufacturing and grain quality management curriculum manager. “It also helps them understand how to improve their feed operations.”

Course participants learned new techniques and updated their knowledge in feed manufacturing, including information on ingredient and soybean meal quality, feed storage, feed safety programs, pelleting, extrusion processing, and feed mill design and material handling. Participants heard from USSEC representatives along with IGP faculty and Kansas State professors. In addition to presentation-style learning, participants toured the KSU O.H. Kruse Feed Mill to gain a better understanding of feed manufacturing and plant operations.

Course participant Elizabeth Bastidas from Colombia says she attended the course to learn from others in her industry.

“I wanted to meet people from other countries with the same type of product,” Ms. Bastidas says. “I have enjoyed listening to other individuals’ strategies so that I can incorporate them myself.”

Roger Ferrera, a plant manager for Cargill in Honduras and course participant, said that it was nice to see a variety of companies represented.

“I enjoyed the diversity of companies that took the course and the exchange of knowledge between them,” Mr. Ferrera says. “This is all information that I can take back to my own plant.”

Mr. Ferrera says he enjoyed the quality of instructors and their presentations throughout the week. “You can tell that they know a lot about the subject and can pinpoint specific issues we have in our own plants at home.”

Course participants learn how to measure mixing uniformity

Course participants learn how to measure mixing uniformity

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Course participants learn how to measure particle size from course instructor Carlos Campabadal

USSEC Provides Technical Assistance to Livestock Producers in Mexico

Monday, October 10, 2016
Category Americas Animal Utilization General News 
USSEC recently provided technical assistance to livestock producers in the states of San Luis Potosi and Jalisco, Mexico. USSEC technicians, Carlos Campabadal and…

USSEC recently provided technical assistance to livestock producers in the states of San Luis Potosi and Jalisco, Mexico.

USSEC technicians, Carlos Campabadal and Carlos Espinosa, visited VALI feed mill in San Luis Potosi. VALI produces all types of feeds and also sells roasted and extruder full fat soybean meal (FFSBM), purchasing between 4,000 to 5,000 metric tons (MT) of U.S. soybean meal. During this visit, discussions were related to feed production, especially in the area of roasted and extruder FFSBM, including the nutritional differences between these two products, their nutritional value, and the methodology to evaluate the processing effect.

USSEC consultants Carlos Campabadal and Carlos Espinosa provide technical assistance to dairy producers

USSEC consultants Carlos Campabadal and Carlos Espinosa provide technical assistance to dairy producers

In Jalisco, the consultants visited Forrajes Mendez. This feed mill produces all types of feeds (2,000 MT/month) and sells feed ingredients (5,000 MT/month) to producers that make their own feed. They buy between 1,500 to 2,000 MT of U.S. soybean meal. Mr. Campadabal and Mr. Espinosa visited the storage area to evaluate the quality of the feed ingredients and to review the process to produce the feed.

The next visit was to Tinajeros Dairy Farm, which is known for its Holstein dairy cows. This farm has a forage program, and the USSEC consultants made some recommendations about it and also about the use of U.S. soybean bypass protein in their rations.

Next up was Forrajes Mercado, a feed mill that sells 3,000 MT of feed of different species and feed ingredients. They purchase 1,500 to 2,000 MT of U.S. soybean meal. The feed mill was visited and USSEC reviewed the quality of the feed ingredient, finding that the soybean meal was of good quality. The consultants saw feed production, reviewed the particle size of the feeds, and discussed the quality of the U.S. soybean, the methodology to evaluate this product.

The last visit was to a beef cattle feedlot, La Mezquitera, which has 300 cattle of different breeds. The cattle’s diet utilizes U.S. soybean meal as a source of protein, which is not common in feedlot cattle. USSEC provided several nutritional and management recommendations to improve performance.

 

Covert Participates in Trade Mission to Cuba

Monday, October 3, 2016
Category Americas General News 
USSEC secretary and Illinois Soybean Association director Sharon Covert was part of a delegation representing American soybean and poultry groups that visited Cuba…

USSEC secretary and Illinois Soybean Association director Sharon Covert was part of a delegation representing American soybean and poultry groups that visited Cuba on a trade mission last week.

The U.S. team met with poultry, egg and soybean representatives to learn more about Cuba’s food distribution system and to discuss biosecurity, food safety and nutrition issues. The mission’s focus was to assess the potential for greater U.S. agricultural trade as relations between the U.S. and Cuba continue to develop.

The delegation represents the first mission to Cuba funded by the soybean checkoff since America started normalizing trade relations with the country. The Illinois Soybean Association checkoff program and the Iowa Soybean Association, funded by the soybean checkoff, backed the trip.

USSEC chairman Jim Miller says while Cuba isn’t a large market, it could be an important one in the future.

Mr. Miller said the possible opening of the Cuban market comes at a good time as producers are facing low commodity prices.

“When we have depressed market prices like this, any time that we can open up a new market, it’s a great opportunity for us,” he stated.

He explained that establishing and opening new markets takes time, patience, and persistence, as evidenced by U.S. efforts to open the Chinese market.

“We worked in China for 12 years before we sold the first soybean to China,” Mr. Miller says. “In 1995, China bought 145,000 metric tons from the U.S. and last year, China bought 30 million metric tons from the U.S.” Although the size of the Cuban market won’t be nearly that size, Mr. Miller feels that the country holds great promise for trade, now that the embargo is crumbling.

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USSEC Participates in Global Agri-Food Forum in Mexico

Monday, October 3, 2016
Category Americas General News 
USSEC participated in Consejo Nacional Agropecuario’s (CNA) forum, Foro Global Agroalimentario, in Puebla, Mexico on September 29 and 30. CNA’s Global Agri-Food Forum…

cnaUSSEC participated in Consejo Nacional Agropecuario’s (CNA) forum, Foro Global Agroalimentario, in Puebla, Mexico on September 29 and 30.

CNA’s Global Agri-Food Forum is an annual event that brings together high-level specialists in agri-food issues from around the world. The forum aims to analyze the most important issues for the global food industry.

USSEC CEO Jim Sutter spoke at the event and served as part of a sustainability panel on the conference’s first day.

 

USSEC Provides Technical Assistance To Livestock Producers in Mexico

Monday, October 3, 2016
Category Americas Animal Utilization General News 
USSEC provided technical assistance to one of the largest poultry operations in the Mexican state of Aguas Calientes. USSEC consultants Carlos Campabadal and Carlos…

USSEC provided technical assistance to one of the largest poultry operations in the Mexican state of Aguas Calientes.

USSEC consultants Carlos Campabadal and Carlos Espinosa provided technical assistance to Sabro Pollo, which produces 900,000 broilers and 15,000 metric tons (MT) of broiler feed weekly. The company purchases 3600 to 4000 MT per month of U.S. soybean meal from a local company.

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Topics discussed were the advantages of using U.S. soybean meal as a source of protein and problems that may be experienced in broiler performance with the use of high levels of dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGs) such as reduction in gains and feed conversion due to the rancidity of the oil, high fiber content, low amino acids digestibility, and the presence of mycotoxins in this product. The USSEC consultants recommended the use of U.S. soybean oil, because it has higher energy levels and is an excellent product, especially for pre-starter diets.

The second visit was to FOGASA, which produces 20,000 MT/month of feed. During this visit, the consultants discussed the use of special sources of U.S. bypass protein in dairy cattle such as SoyPlus and several nutrition and management topics to help increase the use of U.S. soybean meal.

The last company visited was Nutry Pollo. This company produces 5 million broilers per cycle and produces 9,000 MT of broiler feed, purchasing 2,500 to 3,000 MT of U.S. soybean meal. The topics discussed were related to the level of urease in soybean meal, and the methodology to measure this parameter as well as the optimum level (0.01 -0.05) to process soybean meal. The consultants also discussed the use of enzymes, mycotoxins in the corn, tannins in the sorghum, and the importance of making a good pre-starter diet. Because this company is using free fatty acids as a source of energy, it was recommended to change to soybean oil and the use of full fat soybean meal since they have an Anderson extruder.

 

USSEC Provides Trade and Technical Servicing to Shrimp Producers in Peru

Monday, October 3, 2016
Category Americas Aquaculture General News 
USSEC provided technical support to commercial shrimp growers in Peru by holding multiple discussions with a feedmill representative and fish and shrimp producers…

peru1USSEC provided technical support to commercial shrimp growers in Peru by holding multiple discussions with a feedmill representative and fish and shrimp producers about modifying diet formulations for fish and shrimp by incorporating more soybean meal derived from U.S.-grown soybeans.

Visits to fish and shrimp farms and facilities by USSEC consultants Dr. John Hargreaves and Jairo Amezquita consisted of six one-on-one or small-group direct technical consultations and presentations to farm groups about pond preparation and water management of shrimp ponds to improve productivity and technical capacity. The presentation consisted of sections on sediment removal, pond drying, soil liming, fertilization, managing water transparency through water exchange, and the use of probiotics in fish and shrimp farming. Six large and prominent fish and shrimp farms in Huacho, Piura and Tumbes were visited. The presentations were made to personnel at two of the six farms visited. Mr. Amezquita also talked about USSEC’s role in the development of global aquaculture, emphasizing the advantages of using U.S. Soy in shrimp diets.peru2

Dr. Hargreaves´s presentation focused on pond preparation and water management of fish and shrimp ponds to improve productivity. The lecture consisted of sections on sediment removal, pond drying, soil liming, fertilization, managing water transparency through water exchange, and the use of probiotics in shrimp farming. A few points were emphasized to shrimp farmers as recommendations:

1) The importance of pond drying was emphasized to oxidize accumulated organic matter. It was recommended that farmers have a production cycle with a 15-day interval between harvesting one crop and stocking juveniles for the next crop. Within this 15-day interval, there should be 7 days of bright sunshine with the pond completely exposed.

2) Ponds should be routinely tested to evaluate soil pH. This is especially true for ponds located in former mangrove wetlands, which are known to have soils with low pH and a very high lime requirement. The point was emphasized that ponds will not respond well to fertilization unless soil pH is greater than 7.

3) Perhaps the most important point emphasized was that the best way to manage dissolved oxygen in ponds without aeration is to manage water transparency. By maintaining a water transparency (as indicated by Secchi disk visibility) of 30-50 cm, there should be no problems with dissolved oxygen concentration. This can be problematic in shrimp farming areas where source water is already highly eutrophic, as indicated in at least one farm visited.

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USSEC Wins First Gold for U.S. Soy

Monday, September 26, 2016
Category Americas General News 
USSEC America’s team, in conjunction with the J. Walter Thompson advertising agency, has been awarded the 2016 gold at the ASPID awards for their campaign “Soy es Salud…

soyessalud6USSEC America’s team, in conjunction with the J. Walter Thompson advertising agency, has been awarded the 2016 gold at the ASPID awards for their campaign “Soy es Salud” or “Soy is Health.”

The ASPID award is selected from the Barcelona, Spain-based entity that evaluates and awards the best advertising and promotional campaigns in the Ibero-American countries in certain categories. This is the first time that a U.S. organization’s campaign has been selected for the award.

The objective of “Soy es Salud” is to increase the awareness of the different soy products available and the health benefits of soy. The creative from the USSEC campaign has been used in Colombia, Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and the Dominican Republic and is available for the USSEC offices globally, as well as stakeholders.

The initial concept initiated with USSEC Americas Regional Manager Nayeli Vilanova with the assistance of USSEC consultant Mark Andersen. The campaign was focused on helping consumers realize how many products can be obtained from soybeans besides soy sauce and to position a graphic image in the minds of customers and consumers to help them to promote their products as well as understand what soy is and differentiate the origin as U.S. Soy.

Several qualified state soybean boards (QSSBs) have already shown interest in the creative.  Please contact Nayeli Vilanova with any questions.

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USSEC Expands Social Programs in AM Region

Monday, August 22, 2016
Category Americas General News Soy Foods 
Tags Circus of Soy 
USSEC is working in a partnership with private and government entities in the Americas region on a series of soy social programs to improve child nutrition. This year,…

USSEC is working in a partnership with private and government entities in the Americas region on a series of soy social programs to improve child nutrition.

This year, USSEC extended the coverage and scope of its social programs project to Colombia to implement an interactive way to teach nutrition to vulnerable populations.

On June 9, USSEC consultant – South America Belinda Pignotti, together with Gabriela Santos, director of the Foundation Las Golondrinas, and Maria Lia Neira, MNR Comunicaciones y Ediciones director, presented the public – private alliance between the Medellin, Colombia government (Alcaldia de Medellin) and its food security ministry, Las Golondrinas Foundation, with the support of the Colombian Welfare Institute (ICBF) and USSEC to the media in Medellin. 26 journalists attended the media event
 where a Medellin government representative spoke about the importance of developing interactive programs to promote nutrition, including soy in daily diets as well as supporting the local industry.

On June 26, the Circus of Soy was held in Medellin. The event was designed to be an interactive performance conceptualized to engage children while teaching them the basic concepts of nutrition and healthy food, including soy, as part of a daily diet. The program aimed to educate future consumers about soyfoods.

500 kids were provided with the opportunity to participate in a whole learning experience about soy, nutrition, and healthy food in a didactic and interactive way with dance and magic tricks in which soy was the main character and protagonist.

One of the main topics was to differentiate the origins of soy and explain its good quality and nutritional value as a complete protein with healthy fats. The children were also taught that soy is an excellent animal feed and is a sustainable, environmentally friendly crop that helps the planet.

The children prepared easy recipes with soy and enjoyed a lunch prepared with soy including a soy hamburger, red berry soymilk shake, and soy chocolate cookies.Soya2

To complement the program, the MNR team composed a soy song, which explain the traceability of this seed to show the kids the versatility and huge potential of soybeans.

At the end of the performance and the lunch, the kids reviewed the learned concepts making puzzles and drawing things related to soy and nutrition. Children also received a bag filled with soy products and a didactic booklet to use at home.

Soya1The Circus Of Soy was complemented with a soy cooking class for 300 community mothers.

During this workshop, the moms learned new soy recipes and talked with USSEC nutritionist Guadalupe Esquivel about soy’s nutritional and health benefits.

At a farm, the kids learned about the soy crop, how to take care the environment the way U.S. Soy producers do, and how soy provides good nutrition for animals. They planted their own soybean seeds to bring it home so they could watch for germination. The children also had the opportunity to feed animals and learned the difference between animal and vegetable proteins.

With the program, USSEC accomplished the goal of teaching vulnerable populations to include soy in their diets and nutrition basics.

To listen to the soy song, just click on the arrow.

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USSEC Participates in See for Yourself Mission

Monday, August 22, 2016
Category Americas General News 
USSEC participated in the United Soybean Board’s (USB) See for Yourself mission to Panama and Costa Rica August 4 – 12. The See for Yourself program is aimed at U.S. soybean…

USSEC participated in the United Soybean Board’s (USB) See for Yourself mission to Panama and Costa Rica August 4 – 12.

The See for Yourself program is aimed at U.S. soybean farmers who want to learn more about their customers beyond the grain elevator and the U.S. Soy industry’s role in marketing U.S. Soy to these customers. Participants hear firsthand about the qualities customers desire in their soybeans and see how the U.S. soybean industry is a multi-faceted, global business.

Ten soybean farmers were selected to travel with grower leaders including USB chair Jared Hagert and USB directors Keith Tapp, Gregg Fujan, and Nancy Kavazanjian. USSEC staff included Regional Representative – Americas Francisco de la Torre, Marketing Director Aquaculture/ Customer Focus Colby Sutter, USSEC Regional Deputy Director Nayeli Vilanova, and USSEC consultant Belinda Pignotti. USSEC CEO Jim Sutter gave a presentation to the group in Panama City.

Infrastructure discussions that began in St. Louis continued as the participants went through the newly expanded Panama Canal. The canal’s recent expansion doubled the waterway’s capacity, helping to ship U.S. Soy to foreign markets faster. International soy buyers often pay as much attention to the timeliness of deliveries as they do the price, and so the canal’s expansion increased U.S. Soy’s competitiveness on the global scale. About 44 percent of exported soybeans from the U.S. pass through the Panama Canal.

The program concluded in Costa Rica, a country that imported 100 percent of its soy from the U.S. in the 2014/2015 marketing year. Participants heard from INOLASA, the sole soybean-crushing plant in Central America. USSEC, together with the soy checkoff, partnered with INOLASA to increase U.S. soybean consumption in Costa Rica, taking it from 33 percent of its imports in 2014 to 100 percent in 2015.

While in Costa Rica, participants also learned about the soy-fed fish industry from Martec Industries, a company dedicated to the production, processing and marketing of seafood, especially red snapper. The soy checkoff invests in the marketing and promotion of soy in fish feed and helped Martec incorporate soybean meal into its rations. The fish are raised in cages in the Pacific Ocean and their feed includes roughly 18 percent soy, all of which comes from the U.S.

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USSEC Hosts RAPCO at IGP Institute

Monday, August 15, 2016
Category Americas Animal Utilization General News 
Tags IGP RAPCO 
30 participants from 13 Latin American countries took part in the Regional Agricultural Production Course (RAPCO) Poultry Nutrition Course July 26 – 29 held at the International…

30 participants from 13 Latin American countries took part in the Regional Agricultural Production Course (RAPCO) Poultry Nutrition Course July 26 – 29 held at the International Grains Program (IGP) Institute Conference Center in Manhattan, Kansas. The course partnership between the IGP Institute and USSEC provided participants with knowledge and details of poultry nutrition, essentials for avian health.

Instructors at this four day course taught many areas of poultry nutrition and feed practices including details on the bird’s digestive system, effects of selected mycotoxins in poultry, how to maximize the use of energy in poultry diets, nutrient values of soybean meal from different origins, broiler management, amino acid profile and requirement for broilers and layers, growth promoting antibiotics, and how to maximize the use of calcium and phosphorus.

“Our partnership with USSEC is very important for the IGP Institute, so for us it is critical to provide them with the best technical program and with the best service for their trainings,” says Carlos Campabadal, curriculum manager for feed manufacturing and grain storage and program coordinator for all Spanish language trainings at the IGP Institute. “The relationship between IGP Institute and USSEC helps provide technical value to the overseas clients of U.S. soybean and soybean meal.”

Carlos Campabadal, curriculum manager for feed manufacturing and grain quality management, gives participants a tour of the O.H. Kruse Feed Technology Innovation Center

Carlos Campabadal, curriculum manager for feed manufacturing and grain quality management, gives participants a tour of the O.H. Kruse Feed Technology Innovation Center

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Keith Behnke, emeritus professor at Kansas State University, lectures on poultry feed processing and nutrition

USSEC to Participate in See For Yourself Mission in Panama, Costa Rica

Monday, August 1, 2016
Category Americas General News 
Tags See for Yourself 
USSEC will participate in the United Soybean Board’s (USB) See for Yourself mission to Panama and Costa Rica August 4 – 12. The See for Yourself program is aimed at U.S. soybean…

USSEC will participate in the United Soybean Board’s (USB) See for Yourself mission to Panama and Costa Rica August 4 – 12.

The See for Yourself program is aimed at U.S. soybean farmers who want to learn more about their customers beyond the grain elevator and the U.S. Soy industry’s role in marketing U.S. Soy to these customers. Participants hear firsthand about the qualities customers desire in their soybeans.

Ten soybean farmers will travel with grower leaders including USB chair Jared Hagert and USB directors Keith Tapp, Gregg Fujan, and Nancy Kavazanjian. USSEC staff will include Regional Representative – Americas Francisco de la Torre, Marketing Director Aquaculture/ Customer Focus Colby Sutter, USSEC Regional Deputy Director Nayeli Vilanova, and consultant Belinda Pignotti. USSEC CEO Jim Sutter is slated to give a presentation to the group in Panama City.

USSEC Conducts Negotiation Course in Dominican Republic

Monday, May 16, 2016
Category Americas General News Soy Foods 
USSEC conducted a negotiation course on April 6 and 7 with the objective of increasing the sales of U.S. soybean oil. This workshop was held in Santo Domingo, Dominican…

USSEC conducted a negotiation course on April 6 and 7 with the objective of increasing the sales of U.S. soybean oil. This workshop was held in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and representatives from the Dominican’s soybean oil refineries’ sales forces attended.

The workshop was given by USSEC consultant Javier Sanchez and provided participants with the knowledge necessary to improve their negotiation skills and strategies. The attendees have to make different negotiations with supermarkets, distributors and other stores in their sales positions. The primary skills that they learned were: the main roles in a negotiation agreement; the position when people negotiate; know that a win-win position is the best alternative; and steps for a successful negotiation. This was a dynamic and interactive course.

USSEC consultants Jorge Martínez and Fradbelin Escarraman presented topics related to soybean oil to provide additional sales tools to event participants. Mr. Escarraman opened the event and spoke about USSEC’s mission and market opportunities for soybean oil in various market segments. Mr. Martínez spoke about the characteristics and nutrition benefits of U.S. soybean oil and about the uses of U.S. soybean oil in the food industry.

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USSEC Provides Technical Assistance on the Use of Full Fat Soybean Meal in Southeastern Mexico

Monday, May 16, 2016
Category Americas Animal Utilization General News 
Inter Industrias del Sur Este, formed by eight feed mills, imports U.S. products, especially corn and U.S. soybeans (87,000 metric tons (MT)/year) for those feed mills.…

Inter Industrias del Sur Este, formed by eight feed mills, imports U.S. products, especially corn and U.S. soybeans (87,000 metric tons (MT)/year) for those feed mills. The company recently requested USSEC’s advice regarding the use of more full fat soybean meal (FFSBM) in poultry diets because one of its members, CRIO Group, wanted to increase the level of FFSBM in its diets, and they had several questions on the efficient use of FFSBM.

CRIO Group is the fourth largest hen laying company in Mexico with 6.5 million layers and produces 11,000 broilers per week. CRIO uses 5000 MT/month of full-fat soybeans from U.S. beans and also buys 7,500 MT/month of soybean meal. The group’s main questions were related to the nutritional value of FFSBM and soybean meal, the effect of processing in its nutritional value, ways to evaluate good quality FFSBM and soybean meal, as well as many questions about the problems of high levels of FFSBM in diets and general questions about these two soybean products.

To answer these questions, USSEC animal utilization consultant Carlos Campabadal presented two conferences to CRIO’s technical staff titled, “The Effect of Using a Low Quality Processed Soybean Meal” and “The Use of Full Fat Soybeans in Animal Diets.” Dr. Campabadal recommended increasing the level of FFSBM in the poultry diets between five and ten percent.

During this trip, Dr. Campabadal also visited other members of the Inter Industrias del Sur Este including Lorgan, Malta Texo, and Industria Avipecuarias Peninsulares (KAKI), and they received technical assistance in poultry nutrition and feed manufacturing.

USSEC consultant Carlos Campabadal presents a conference on the nutritional value of FFSBM for CRIO's technical staff

USSEC consultant Carlos Campabadal presents a conference on the nutritional value of FFSBM for CRIO’s technical staff

Dr. Campabadal and fellow USSEC consultant Pedro Gonzalez review the quality of the FFSBM produced by CRIO

Dr. Campabadal and fellow USSEC consultant Pedro Gonzalez review the quality of the FFSBM produced by CRIO

USSEC Hosts Ecuadorian Agriculturalists on Tour of U.S. Ag Industry

Monday, May 9, 2016
Category Americas General News 
USSEC had the privilege of hosting a group consisting of nine Ecuadorian agriculturalists during a weeklong trip through Missouri and Iowa. From April 25-29, the group,…

USSEC had the privilege of hosting a group consisting of nine Ecuadorian agriculturalists during a weeklong trip through Missouri and Iowa. From April 25-29, the group, composed of Ecuadorian farmers and representatives from the Ecuador Minister of Agriculture’s office, learned the ins and outs of soybean and corn production through various meetings with businesses in the ag industry, academia and farmers.

Francisco de la Torre, USSEC Regional Representative for the Americas region, viewed the chance to host this team as an excellent opportunity to expand on the current relationship between the U.S. agricultural industry and Ecuadorian ag producers and consumers. Additionally, providing the group with a firsthand encounter of U.S. agriculture instilled a higher sense of confidence and trust in the crops produced by U.S. farmers.

“Providing the opportunity for importers of U.S. Soy and other commodities to see how the production process works is increasingly valuable,” said Mr. de la Torre. “People want to know where their food comes from and how it was produced. Ecuador is purchasing more and more U.S. Soy every year; we want them to know that no one can produce the same high quality products as efficiently as the U.S. farmer.”

The team had a series of meetings discussing current production and management practices at both the University of Missouri and Iowa State University. The group was especially interested in the topics of biotechnology, as Ecuadorian producers do not currently produce genetically modified crops; sustainability; and yields. Additionally, the team had the opportunity to visit both the Bay Research Farm, the Missouri Soybean Association’s farm and home to Missouri Soybean Merchandising Council (MSMC) research,  and Greenley Research Center in Missouri. Staff from the University of Missouri discussed the basics of planting, breeding, feed trail, and production management research taking places at the farms.

Additional visits to industry members allowed the team to learn more about the hands-on presence of U.S. agriculture. DuPont Pioneer hosted the team at their headquarters in Johnston, Iowa, allowing them the opportunity to learn more about one of the world’s largest seed companies. ADM introduced them to a soybean processing facility in Des Moines, Iowa, discussing the various soy products they produce and the importance of sustainability in the industry. The Iowa Corn Growers Association gave great insight on the functionality of farmer-supported organizations and how each contribution impacts the marketability of U.S. commodities. The MSMC and Iowa Soybean Association also had the opportunity to meet with the visiting agriculturalists, as well as assisting with the planning of visits during the trip.

The highlights of the trip for the Ecuadorian guests included trips to farms in Missouri and Iowa. Despite stormy conditions, Doug and Becky Thomas were able to discuss their operations and the importance of their family being involved in their northern Missouri operation. Additionally, the team was able to visit with Rolland Schnell, Iowa farmer and President Elect of the Iowa Soybean Association Board of Directors, on his farm in central Iowa. Rolland and wife Donna discussed their involvement with the Iowa Soybean Association and how the association positively impacts Iowa farming. The team was greatly interested in Mr. Schnell’s and the Thomas’ usage precision technology, selecting and using genetically modified hybrids, and investments in equipment and facilities.

 

At the Thomas farm, the group discussed grain storage

At the Thomas farm, the group discussed grain storage

 

Mr. Schnell took great pleasure in the opportunity to host this team.

“The thing that impressed me most about this team was their interest in the details and all the aspects of our operations. From how we select or seed and technologies to our equipment and management practices, they were completely interested in everything we shared. Hosting them was a wonderful opportunity,” said Mr. Schnell.

 

The group enjoyed its visit to the Schnell farm

The group enjoyed its visit to the Schnell farm

 

“Allowing trade teams and others with interest in U.S. Soy and American agriculture to participate in on-site interaction with farmers and others in the industry is very beneficial,” said Eric Gibson, Stakeholder Relations Coordinator at USSEC. “The groups who met with our guests are enthusiastic about sharing their experiences in the industry. Agriculture and food production has a great story to tell and many eager to do just that.”

USSEC hosts a number of trade teams from around the world each year. To find out about USSEC’s involvement with trade teams or if you have interest in hosting a team, please contact Eric Gibson, Stakeholder Relations Coordinator, at egibson@ussec.org.

 

At the University of Missouri, the group met with Dr. Nicolas Kalaitzandonakes

At the University of Missouri, the group met with Dr. Nicolas Kalaitzandonakes

 

At Iowa State, the team visited the ISU Seed Science Center and talked with three Ecuadorian grad students studying there

At Iowa State, the team visited the ISU Seed Science Center and talked with three Ecuadorian grad students studying there

USSEC Participates in Costa Rica Swine Congress

Monday, May 9, 2016
Category Americas Animal Utilization General News 
On March 15 and 16, the Costa Rican Swine Producers Association presented the Costa Rica Annual Swine Congress at Cariari Country Club in Heredia, Costa Rica. USSEC participated…
USSEC consultant Julio Chaves serves as master of ceremonies at Costa Rica’s swine congress

USSEC consultant Julio Chaves serves as master of ceremonies at Costa Rica’s swine congress

On March 15 and 16, the Costa Rican Swine Producers Association presented the Costa Rica Annual Swine Congress at Cariari Country Club in Heredia, Costa Rica.

USSEC participated as a co-sponsor and two technicians participated in key roles. USSEC consultant Julio Chaves was involved in the development of the program as the chairperson of the scientific committee and also served as master of ceremony for the entire event, and USSEC consultant Carlos Campabadal gave a talk about differences in soymeal quality based upon country of origin.

One hundred and six producers from different parts of Costa Rica attended this annual event. 15 presentations were given and 65 people from commercial firms interacted with the audience at stands and booths.

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Ivania Quesada of the Vice Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock inaugurated the event

USSEC Provides Technical Service to Shrimp Producers in Mexico

Monday, May 2, 2016
Category Americas Aquaculture General News 
USSEC recently provided technical service to Mexican shrimp producers. USSEC consultants Jairo Amezquita and Dr. Eduardo Reyes travelled to Ciudad Obregon, Los Mochis…

Mexico3USSEC recently provided technical service to Mexican shrimp producers.

USSEC consultants Jairo Amezquita and Dr. Eduardo Reyes travelled to Ciudad Obregon, Los Mochis and Mazatlan, Mexico to visit shrimp producers who are customers of Vimifos, an aqua feed mill co-operator of USSEC. They provided recommendations to overcome the challenge with growth rates of a new shrimp strain from Ecuador that has been used for the past two years to improve the survival and production per hectare.

The consultants visited three shrimp farms where they made inspections and met with technical staff, highlighting how the current management of this shrimp strain and corresponding aquaculture practices are not working and are reducing performance conditions. They also discussed opportunities and challenges to develop recirculating water systems, current farm situations, and guidelines to prevent or mitigate the possible entrance of pathogens that could affect not only the growth rates but also the survival of the shrimp.

Additionally, Mr. Amezquita and Dr. Reyes conducted seminars for shrimp producers in each of the three cities visited. More than 150 people attended these events and Dr. Reyes presented a lecture, “How to Manage the Ecuadorian Shrimp Strain Under Mexican Conditions.” He explained how to improve the water conditions for shrimp production, emphasizing best aquaculture practices.

Mr. Amezquita addressed “USSEC’s Role in the Development of Aquaculture in the World,” where he emphasized the current situation of the aquaculture industry in the world, Latin America and Mexico, and spoke about opportunities to prevent early mortality syndrome (EMS). He also presented statistics and trial results of the inclusion of soybean protein concentrate (SPC) and soybean protein isolate (IP) into the diets for aqua species.

Last year, Mexico produced more than 100,000 metric tons (MT) of shrimp, which represented more than 50,000 MT of U.S. Soy products, with an even higher forecast for FY16-17.

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