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USSEC Holds Feed Manufacturing Training Course for Eastern European Soy Customers

Monday, May 18, 2015
Category General News 
USSEC organized a one week training course in early May focusing on new advances in feed manufacturing for Eastern European soy customers. The class was held at the University…

USSEC organized a one week training course in early May focusing on new advances in feed manufacturing for Eastern European soy customers. The class was held at the University Politechnica of Madrid, under the coordination of USSEC consultant Gonzalo Mateos.

USSEC brought feed industry professionals from Romania and Poland to hear from Professor Mateos and USSEC Feed Technologist Consultant Dr. Juan Acedo Rico about the latest advances in feed manufacturing and Spain’s experience in modern feed milling and the efficient usage of soy in animal feed.

In addition to classes, field visits including poultry, swine, and dairy feed mills and a liquid ingredients blending plant offered participants an excellent chance to understand the upcoming trends over the next ten years in the European feed industry.

Eastern EuropeConstantin Bompa, from Nutrimold Trouw feed mill said: “The USSEC training course, New Advances in Feed Manufacturing, gave us the opportunity to refresh our knowledge about the value of U.S. Soy commodities and learn the latest developments in the EU’s feed manufacturing sector. The field visits provided an up close look at state of the art feed manufacturing equipment used in Veravic and Teca Feed Mills.”

“In addition to listening to Dr. Mateos about the value of U.S. Soy and Dr. Rico sharing his valuable knowledge during the classes, the field visits at representative feed mills around Madrid included hands-on, practical experiences on particle size reduction of feed ingredients and feed pelleting, which was very helpful for us. Not in the least, the USSEC training was a meeting place for Eastern and Southern [European] feed milling professionals to come together for discussion about U.S. Soy and educate buyers,” declared Eda Kizilcelik, vice president of the Romanian Feed Manufactures Association.

According to Dr. Rico, “We feel like you can never go wrong by investing in the education of soy customers. Returns will come in the near future in the form of people from all over Europe implementing and making use working the knowledge we shared. Taking into account that the EU is the second largest customer of U.S. Soy, the more feed each EU state will produce, the more soy they will use.”

“All the participants at the event appreciated the opportunity to have access to latest information from the field of feed manufacturing and soy quality,” Dr. Mateos added. “U.S. soybean meal orders should be generated by the Eastern European customers by continuing to educate them to pay more attention on the protein quality, emphasizing amino acids digestibility.”

See pictures from the course here: SST PICS Feed Technology Madrid Course

Soy Partnership Summit to Take Place in India

Monday, May 18, 2015
Category General News 
USSEC’s annual soy partnership summit will take place on July 23 and 24 in Indore, India. The event gathers a value chain of Indian soy stakeholders composed of buyers,…

USSEC’s annual soy partnership summit will take place on July 23 and 24 in Indore, India.

The event gathers a value chain of Indian soy stakeholders composed of buyers, manufacturers and sellers. Since its conception in Hyderabad in 2009, the summit has grown in popularity, size, quality and reach. For the last three years, the meeting has been conducted in Indore, considered to be the soy hub of India and has grown by 20-25 percent each year.

Please read more about the event here: Soy Partnership Forum 2015, Indore – First Announcement copy

USSEC Attends Reception Honoring U.S. Ag Secretary in Jordan

Monday, May 11, 2015
Category General News 
USSEC was invited to a reception hosted by the U.S. Ambassador to Jordan, Alice Wells, in honor of the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, Thomas Vilsack, on May 10 at the ambassador…

USSEC was invited to a reception hosted by the U.S. Ambassador to Jordan, Alice Wells, in honor of the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, Thomas Vilsack, on May 10 at the ambassador’s home in Amman.

U.S. Regional Agriculture Counselor, USSEC Regional Commercial, Technical & Marketing Director – MENA Mousa Wakileh, ASA director E.L. Reed and U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Thomas Vilsack

U.S. Regional Agriculture Counselor, USSEC Regional Commercial, Technical & Marketing Director – MENA Mousa Wakileh, ASA director E.L. Reed and U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Thomas Vilsack

USSEC Regional Commercial, Technical & Marketing Director – MENA Mousa Wakileh, American Soybean Association (ASA) director E.L. Reed, and USSEC Marketing Director – Human Nutrition/Oil Marypat Corbett met with Secretary Vilsack, Ambassador Wells and the U.S. Regional Agriculture Counselor.

According to Mr. Wakileh, USSEC’s three main messages highlighted the importance of improved GMO approvals in Turkey; stressed that U.S. Soy represented around 20 percent of overall U.S. agricultural exports last year; and emphasized USSEC’s role in the development of poultry production, feed production and formulation, soybean crushing, and soybean oil refining in the international market. ‎‎

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Mr. Wakileh, Mr. Reed and Secretary Vilsack

The USSEC delegates also met with Dr. Akef Al Zoubi from the Jordanian Ministry of Agriculture. They spoke to him about USSEC’s activities, role and achievements in the MENA region.

USSEC Holds 2nd Regional Soybean Processing and Refining Conference in Jordan

Monday, May 11, 2015
Category General News 
Sixty attendees from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) participated in USSEC’s 2nd Regional Soybean Processing and Refining Conference held in the Dead Sea, Jordan…

Sixty attendees from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) participated in USSEC’s 2nd Regional Soybean Processing and Refining Conference held in the Dead Sea, Jordan from May 8-10. American Soybean Association (ASA) director E.L. Reed of Missouri helped put a personal face on the American soybean farmer for participants while USSEC Regional Commercial, Technical & Marketing Director – MENA Mousa Wakileh, USSEC Marketing Director – Human Nutrition/Oil Marypat Corbett, and USSEC Regional Soybean Oil Consultant – MENA Najeh Asad presented information about both the U.S. and MENA soybean industries.

USSEC Marketing Director – Human Nutrition/Oil Marypat Corbett, ASA director E. L. Reed and Tony Freiji, CEO and president of Wadi Holdings, participated in the conference

USSEC Marketing Director – Human Nutrition/Oil Marypat Corbett, ASA director E. L. Reed and Tony Freiji, CEO and president of Wadi Holdings, participated in the conference

Two oilseed processing companies, Crown Iron Works and DeSmet, talked about various soybean processing alternatives for preparation, extraction and refining. Coffee breaks, lunch and dinner allowed the attendees, presenters, grower leader and USSEC staff the opportunity to network and discuss individual queries regarding their own processing issues and philosophies.

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Participants of USSEC’s 2nd Regional Soybean Processing and Refining Conference

 

Conference attendees heard information about the U.S. and MENA soybean industries

Conference attendees heard information about the U.S. and MENA soybean industries

USSEC India Helps Local Industry to Self-Promote Technologies

Monday, May 11, 2015
Category General News 
India is a large country making “reach” a common challenge. USSEC works extensively on soy-related technologies and promotional methodologies to transform…

India is a large country making “reach” a common challenge. USSEC works extensively on soy-related technologies and promotional methodologies to transform customer behaviors or bring about market changes. In India, the transfer of “know-how” continues to be an excellent tactical approach that helps market developments. In addition to USSEC carrying out such programs, it is important that this recipe be adopted and independently continued by the industry.

One example of the industry taking initiative to self-promote technologies to bring in market changes is the Ananda Group, which recently organized a large conference titled “Profit from Aquaculture” in a potential aqua farming hub in south India. Ananda consulted USSEC to plan the strategy and content of the event to address current issues and make it effective. The main objective was to impart knowledge on technology upgrades for feed, farm, water and disease management in the shrimp and fish sectors and make operations profitable. Speakers from Europe, Vietnam, Thailand and Rome were invited to lecture and special efforts were made to short-list and invite a large group of 300 progressive aquaculture entrepreneurs to the event. The Ananda Group paid for all expenses of international speakers and venue costs.

USSEC India’s Feed Program consultants have noticed a change in industry trends where the organization and its methodologies are being increasingly watched or consulted for guidance, design and content development for organizing such sessions, demonstrating new ways in which USSEC’s resources and teams are trusted. USSEC’s standards, when used by the industry, are good tools that add to existing marketing efforts and help influence decisions. The USSEC team in India also believes these are effective, voluntary industry contributions adding value to investments made by the U.S Soy industry.

About 300 progressive aquaculture entrepreneurs attended a session on advocating good aquaculture practices, conducted by the Ananda Group in consultation with USSEC

About 300 progressive aquaculture entrepreneurs attended a session on advocating good aquaculture practices, conducted by the Ananda Group in consultation with USSEC

USSEC Director for Animal Feed and Soy Meal Program – India Dr. P. E. Vijay Anand and USSEC India Aquaculture Consultant R. Umakanth pose with conference resource persons

USSEC Director for Animal Feed and Soy Meal Program – India Dr. P. E. Vijay Anand and USSEC India Aquaculture Consultant R. Umakanth pose with conference resource persons

USSEC Organizes 3-Day Risk Management Workshop in Singapore

Monday, May 11, 2015
Category General News 
USSEC Singapore, together with the Northern Crops Institute (NCI) and North Dakota State University (NDSU), hosted the Southeast Asia Commodity Risk Management Workshop…

SEA1USSEC Singapore, together with the Northern Crops Institute (NCI) and North Dakota State University (NDSU), hosted the Southeast Asia Commodity Risk Management Workshop 2015 from April 27-29 in Singapore. NCI and NDSU are partnered by QSSBs from several states, namely the North Dakota Soybean Council, South Dakota Soybean Research and Promotion Council, and Minnesota Soybean Research and Promotion Council.

Attended by 29 customers from regional grain and oilseeds trading firms, the Risk Management Workshop was conducted by three specialist instructors from the U.S.: Frayne Olson from NDSU, Jay O’Neil from IGP at Kansas State University and Sue Goll of Sue Goll Commodities Consulting, Inc.

Held over three days at the Pan Pacific Hotel, the workshop laid the foundation for risk management moving progressively to risk mitigating strategies specific to trading in the grain and oilseed market.

On the first day, the speakers outlined the global outlook for grain and oilseeds, tools for fundamental analysis, risk management overview and the relationship between the cash and futures markets. Topics covered on the second day included trading and hedging, futures spreads, technical analysis, and analysing and managing basis. Ms. Goll also presented an introduction to options, with calculation exercises for participants to test their understanding. In-depth presentations on options as a procurement strategy, contract strategies and accounting controls wrapped up the final day, with all participants receiving a certificate and group picture each for their attendance.

The Risk Management Workshop series is one of USSEC’s longstanding customer focus programs. This event has enabled USSEC to reach out to customers by providing them with technical knowledge and market information to help them make independent and informed buying decisions. Educating customers on price and risk management practices helps to mitigate price concerns over quality considerations.

One participant, Aman Sethi of Noble Agri, a major grain supplier, particularly appreciated having gained from the expertise of three speakers from the U.S, as the speakers’ farm experience contributed to their credibility and holistic analysis of the market.

Dr. Frayne Olson of SDSU speaks to a group at the Singapore seminar

Dr. Frayne Olson of SDSU speaks to a group at the Singapore seminar

USSEC Participates in Poultry Seminar in Russia

Monday, May 11, 2015
Category General News 
USSEC attended a technical poultry seminar, “New Technologies in Feed Production, Modern Approaches to Feeding of High Productive Crosses, Quality Control…

USSEC attended a technical poultry seminar, “New Technologies in Feed Production, Modern Approaches to Feeding of High Productive Crosses, Quality Control of Raw Materials, Compound Feeds and Feed Additives,” organized by the Russian Poultry Research Institute (VNITIP) on April 9-10 in Sergiev Posad, Russia. A total of 90 people, predominantly representing the feed industry and poultry scientists, attended the seminar.

 

Dr. Jan van Eys prepares to speak to the Russian poultry and feed producers

Dr. Jan van Eys prepares to speak to the Russian poultry and feed producers

USSEC consultant Dr. Jan van Eys gave a lecture titled, “Mash vs. Pellets in Broiler Feeds.” This presentation used a technical subject to communicate about quality differences in soybean meal (including differences in origin) and the impact on broiler production. The presentation was well received as evidenced by the number of questions and reactions of people. The role of USSEC and U.S. Soy products was clearly appreciated and recognized.

 

The two-day visit was used to network and get a better understanding of the Russian markets. U.S. Soy exports to Russia are not subject to sanctions or import restrictions. These same sanctions have become a strong driver for increases in local animal production. The share of poultry in Russia’s domestic meat consumption is expected to continue to grow in 2015. Russian poultry production is expected to be 3.4 million metric tons (MMT) in 2015, up nearly 4.5 percent from 2014. There is a major effort in the area of animal production, which should benefit soy imports. Consequently, a pointed marketing effort and open discussion with the Russian poultry breeding and feed industry could be beneficial to promote imports of U.S. Soy.

Attendees of the poultry seminar in Sergiev Posad

Attendees of the poultry seminar in Sergiev Posad

Dr. van Eys was awarded with the Russian Poultry Seminar Attendance Certificate

Dr. van Eys was awarded with the Russian Poultry Seminar Attendance Certificate

USSEC Provides Trade and Technical Service to Swine and Poultry Producers in Nicaragua

Monday, May 11, 2015
Category General News 
USSEC consultant Julio Chaves recently traveled to Nicaragua on an exploratory trip to initiate contacts to provide technical and trade service in that country. He started…

USSEC consultant Julio Chaves recently traveled to Nicaragua on an exploratory trip to initiate contacts to provide technical and trade service in that country.

He started with a visit to the Nicaragua Sausage Processors Association (CAPROEN) where he provided information about USSEC and its role in market and technical support. The president of CAPROEN was very attentive and plans to collect requests from the members so that CAPROEN, together with USSEC, can organize training sessions in various aspects of sausage making, according to their needs.

Mr. Chaves also visited the largest sausage plant in Nicaragua, which is planning to increase its production and begin exporting its goods. The plant is in the process of planning to remodel the production building and general facilities and to increase space and cold storage areas. They showed interest in receiving technical service from USSEC.

 

USSEC consultant Julio Chaves is shown with members of the Nicaragua Sausage Processors Association board

USSEC consultant Julio Chaves is shown with members of the Nicaragua Sausage Processors Association board

The consultant next visited the Poultry and Feed Producers Association of Nicaragua to discuss USSEC and its role in market and technical support. The president of the association was interested in receiving USSEC trade service about futures and risk management, technical and feed formulation, and GMO issues to help government authorities to make better decisions about GMO products. They will organize a poultry and feed manufacturing seminar on August 5-6 and would like to receive support from USSEC with some speakers.

USSEC’s 4th Aquaculture Investment Workshop Supports Collaboration To Grow Industry in Latin America

Monday, May 4, 2015
Category General News 
Aquaculture professionals gathered at the University of Miami last week for the fourth Aquaculture Investment Workshop, organized by USSEC’s Global Soy in Aquaculture…

Aquaculture professionals gathered at the University of Miami last week for the fourth Aquaculture Investment Workshop, organized by USSEC’s Global Soy in Aquaculture Program and sponsored by the U.S. Soy Family and the Kansas Soybean Commission.

“We’re investing in aquaculture because we think – we know – we know that this is going to be an industry that is going to be feeding soy to the fish,” USSEC Regional Director – Americas Francisco de la Torre told attendees. “You’re already marketing this product, you’re already buying this product. For those that market these seafood products, they have to see the advantages of buying products from aquaculture–there’s a lot more flexibility and there’s a lot more standardization in an aquaculture product than a product that’s harvested from the sea.”AQ1

Approximately 90 representatives of the most cutting-edge aquaculture companies in Latin America and the Caribbean participated in the two-day workshop, which took place April 29-30, gathered to discuss current challenges and opportunities related to growing the industry in the region. Operators from established fish farms shared their success stories, and aspirational companies, who are just getting up and running, spoke of the technical and market particulars of their farmed species. Representatives from the investment, insurance and retail sectors also presented helpful information and advice for growing the burgeoning aquaculture industry.

The invitation-only workshop has evolved over the past three events into one of the most productive and informative conferences in the seafood industry. Participants are recognized as important players representing most sectors of the field and the event is a powerful opportunity for steering industry development in the right direction.

Mr. de la Torre, who organized the event with USSEC aquaculture consultant Jairo Amezquita, remarked at the close of the event that the collaborative nature of the workshop would help to move the industry forward.

“When we first started this workshop, we couldn’t find an aquaculture company who wanted to share their story. They would attend to listen, but wouldn’t feel comfortable talking about their business. Now, there’s a clear understanding that we’re all in this together, so we’re willing to help each other. We need to have a critical mass of healthy, farmed seafood in the marketplace.”

For more information on the Aquaculture Investment Workshop, read the live blog from Intrafish at https://www.intrafish.com/free_news/article1411080.ece.

USSEC CEO Jim Sutter speaks to AIW participants

USSEC CEO Jim Sutter speaks to AIW participants

USSEC Organizes Soy Trade Country Meeting in Ireland

Monday, May 4, 2015
Category General News 
USSEC and the Irish Grain and Feed Association jointly organized a USSEC Soy Trade Country Meeting in Dublin on April 27. Participants represented various parts of the…

USSEC and the Irish Grain and Feed Association jointly organized a USSEC Soy Trade Country Meeting in Dublin on April 27. Participants represented various parts of the Irish soy value chain (importers, feed compounders and poultry producers) as well as the Irish Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine and the U.S. Embassy. Speakers covered bilateral economic and trade relations, including the ongoing TTIP negotiations; the current global and local market conditions for soy products; the U.S. Sustainable Soy Assurance Protocol (SSAP); and nutrition aspects of soybean meal.

Darren Cooper of the International Grains Council speaking to the audience at the USSEC Soy Trade Country Meeting in Ireland

Darren Cooper of the International Grains Council speaking to the audience at the USSEC Soy Trade Country Meeting in Ireland

Ireland is dependent upon imports for feed protein needs, importing 76,000 metric tons of U.S. soybean meal so far this marketing year.   With the elimination of EU production quotas on milk, the Irish dairy industry is heavily investing in expanding production and developing new markets, particularly in Asia. Along with increased diversification to more pork and poultry production, Ireland will be an increasingly important market for U.S. soy exports in the coming years.

Dr. Rory Deverell of FC Stone International talks to seminar participants

Dr. Rory Deverell of FC Stone International talks to seminar participants

USSEC Holds Soy Trade and Risk Management Seminar for Romanian Feed and Livestock Industries

Monday, May 4, 2015
Category General News 
In an effort to support the development of the local feed and livestock industries, USSEC conducted an introductory course on risk management in Romania. Traders, purchasing…

In an effort to support the development of the local feed and livestock industries, USSEC conducted an introductory course on risk management in Romania. Traders, purchasing managers and executives from over 20 companies involved in feed milling, broiler and swine integrations, crushing and trading attended the event in Bucharest on April 29th.

Lola Herrera demonstrates cash market mechanisms and how soy prices are built to key industry decision makers

USSEC consultant Lola Herrera demonstrates cash market mechanisms and how soy prices are built to key industry decision makers

USSEC Commodities Trading Consultant Lola Herrera introduced the current market drivers and projections for the global soy outlook and risk management tools. Besides listening with interest to the lectures, there was a lot of interaction between the trainer and participants, demonstrating the eagerness of the audience in improving its knowledge.

“We do not deal with risk management tools every day and that’s why the event was an excellent opportunity to refresh our knowledge in commodity risk management and learn how to manage volatility instead of reacting to it,” said Ioan Antoci, the general manager of a top local swine integration and one of the very first local customers to import U.S. Soy and adopt soy extrusion technology.

Since quality and price are closely related, USSEC consultant Dr. Iani Chihaia, approached and bridged those topics during his presentations, discussing different quality aspects and the various interests of importers, traders, crushers, executives and nutritionists. Dr. Chihaia mainly stressed the importance of understanding soybean meal variation and how to deal with this in poultry feed formulation and feeding by recognizing, analyzing and incorporating the variability of soybean meal.

USSEC consultants Lola Herrera and Iani Chihaia met and discussed the status of the local grains and oilseeds market with Bogdan Iliescu, director of the recently established Grains Trading Ring from the Bucharest Commodities Stock Exchange, on April 28

USSEC consultants Lola Herrera and Iani Chihaia met and discussed the status of the local grains and oilseeds market with Bogdan Iliescu, director of the recently established Grains Trading Ring from the Bucharest Commodities Stock Exchange, on April 28

Ms. Herrera concluded, “It has been a pleasure to visit and interact with the Romanian industry people participating in our training and discover their high interest in discussing and enhancing their knowledge in the fundamentals of the commodity markets and the use of price risk management tools. The interest of the industry people comes largely from the fact that Romanian agriculture industry is one of the most promising from EU. I predict that existing growth opportunities will turn within the next few years into expansions of the poultry and swine farms, adding new demand for soy in Romania.”

Purchasing managers, traders and general managers attend the USSEC Risk Management Seminar in Bucharest on April 29

Purchasing managers, traders and general managers attend the USSEC Risk Management Seminar in Bucharest on April 29

USSEC Conducts Poultry Training Program for Egypt, Turkey and Tunisia

Monday, May 4, 2015
Category General News Greater Europe Middle East / North Africa 
The USSEC Poultry Training Program for Egypt, Tunisia and Turkey was held April 19- 25 at the University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine/IFAS, in Gainesville,…

The USSEC Poultry Training Program for Egypt, Tunisia and Turkey was held April 19- 25 at the University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine/IFAS, in Gainesville, Florida. Twelve key veterinarians and managers from the MENA region traveled to the University of Florida to attend the intensive program where disease and management problems affecting their region were discussed in detail. The program allowed for the presentation of new scientific information as well as an exchange of ideas among technical personnel from the participating countries.

Attendees of USSEC’s technical training program that was held for Egypt, Turkey and Tunisia

Attendees of USSEC’s technical training program that was held for Egypt, Turkey and Tunisia

At the current time, infectious diseases are devastating the poultry industries in Egypt, Turkey and Tunisia. The need for improvements in biosecurity and changes in the structure of the poultry industry in these countries is urgent. Topics for presentation and discussion ranged from avian influenza (H9 and H5), genotype 7 Newcastle disease, mycoplasma infections, variant bronchitis, biosecurity programs, vaccination techniques and management of the broiler from the day of arrival to the farm.

USSEC consultant Dr. Gary Butcher provided details on his experiences with these diseases in numerous countries worldwide. The event also provided a forum for technical personnel from the different poultry companies and countries to discuss current conditions and programs being implements to combat these illnesses. Participants commented positively on the program and especially enjoyed the roundtable discussion sessions, which provided them with an opportunity to learn more about problems unique to their region and take back knowledge that can be readily applied to their companies.

Conference participants heard scientific updates on poultry diseases that have hurt the poultry industries in their countries

Conference participants heard scientific updates on poultry diseases that have hurt the poultry industries in their countries

Attendees also toured a high tech and modern processing plant in Live Oak, Florida owned by Pilgrim’s Pride and the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Florida.

USSEC Brings Technical Team to Thailand for Key Trade Event, FFSBM Program

Monday, May 4, 2015
Category General News 
USSEC brought a team of twelve nutritionists and full fat soybean meal (FFSBM) producers from the Philippines, Vietnam and Indonesia to Thailand to visit a FFSBM plant…

USSEC brought a team of twelve nutritionists and full fat soybean meal (FFSBM) producers from the Philippines, Vietnam and Indonesia to Thailand to visit a FFSBM plant and attend a lecture on the use of FFSBM. The team also participated in the trade show VIV Asia in Bangkok on March 11-13. There were an additional fourteen Philippine participants sponsored by Sunmade Inc, and four from Indonesia who joined the team, demontrating the very high interest among the industry in FFSBM utilization.

The team visited the VCF Group, Ltd., one of the biggest commercial pig farms in Thailand with 37,000 sows in five different locations in the country. The VCF facility is located in central Thailand’s Nakhon Pathom province. VCF is a completely integrated farm that operates a state-of-the-art feedmill with computerized control panels and extrusion plants with four extruder machines. According to VCF, local FFSBM producers prefer U.S. soybeans because of the higher oil content but they are limited, however, by what is available on the local market.

Delegates visiting VCF feedmill and farm in Thailand’s Nakhon Pathom province

Delegates visiting VCF feedmill and farm in Thailand’s Nakhon Pathom province

Besides its feed mill operations, VCF also has biogas facilities set up in all its five location farms, supplying all the electricity requirements of the farm and its neighborhood. VCF has its own slaughter house where all its fatteners are sent for chilling and processing. VCF is a family corporation and is being managed by the owner’s three sons.

 

Participants at the FFSBM lecture

Participants at the FFSBM lecture

The highlight of the trip was an exclusive seminar, held at the Centerpoint Hotel in Bangkok, conducted by Dr. Uthai Kanto, director of the Suwanvajokkasikit Animal Research and Development Institute at Kasetsart University, who spoke about the use of FFSBM and cassava in swine and poultry feeds. Dr. Uthai talked about Thailand’s advantage in raw material availability, especially the use of cassava while emphasizing studies showing the extraordinary performance of pigs and poultry which were fed a combination of cassava and FFSBM. Thailand is the biggest consumer of FFSBM in Southeast Asia, with monthly production and consumption of 600,000-700,000 metric tons (MT) per year.

Organizers and some of the participants with the speaker, Dr. Uthai (third from the right)

Organizers and some of the participants with the speaker, Dr. Uthai (third from the right)

The team also visited VIV Asia in Bangkok, a biennial trade event for animal nutrition and feed, showcasing new ideas and technologies. A number of commericial companies with value-added soy products such as fermented soybean meal and soy protein concentrates exhibited at VIV Asia. These companies participated in VIV Asia to actively promote and demonstrate the value of their products. Other commercial by-products from soybeans that were present at the show were lecithin and glycerin, both of which can also be used in specialized feeds.

Delegates visiting VCF feedmill and farm in Thailand’s Nakhon Pathom province

Delegates visiting VCF feedmill and farm in Thailand’s Nakhon Pathom province

USSEC Attends IACA Annual Assembly in Portugal, Holds Customer Meetings in Portugal and Spain

Monday, May 4, 2015
Category General News 
USSEC attended the IACA (Portuguese Feed Association) Annual Assembly in Lisbon. USSEC board member and United Soybean Board (USB) director Bob Metz and American Soybean…

USSEC attended the IACA (Portuguese Feed Association) Annual Assembly in Lisbon. USSEC board member and United Soybean Board (USB) director Bob Metz and American Soybean Association (ASA) vice president Richard Wilkins joined USSEC Regional Director – Greater EU and MENA Brent Babb and USSEC consultant Lola Herrera for this marketing mission to Portugal and Spain.

The IACA assembly was attended by 150 people from Portugal’s feed industry, including importers, crushers, premix companies, and meat producers.

ASA vice president Richard Wilkins addresses participants at the IACA (Portuguese Feed Association) Annual Assembly in Lisbon, Portugal on April 15

ASA vice president Richard Wilkins addresses participants at the IACA (Portuguese Feed Association) Annual Assembly in Lisbon, Portugal on April 15

Mr. Wilkins presented a speech to the Assembly about sustainability and planting intentions in the U.S.

USSEC also participated in an industry panel discussion to talk about quality, explaining the difference among soybean qualities depending on origin with an emphasis on the superior quality of U.S. Soy.

Portugal, one of the southern EU countries, has a population of 10 million. Feed production in the country is about four million tons and it imports the greater part of its protein due to lack of local production. Portugal has imported over 425,000 metric tons of U.S. Soy so far this marketing year.

(Left to right):  USSEC Regional Director – Greater EU and MENA Brent Babb, Financor’s Romao Braz and American Soybean Association (ASA) vice president Richard Wilkins talk together at the IACA (Portuguese Feed Association) Annual Assembly in Lisbon, Portugal on April 15

(Left to right): USSEC Regional Director – Greater EU and MENA Brent Babb, Financor’s Romao Braz and American Soybean Association (ASA) vice president Richard Wilkins talk together at the IACA assembly

The mission to Portugal and Spain provided the USSEC team with an opportunity to meet and talk with the local industry. Mission attendees visited and met with top companies including: Bunge, which manages a crushing plant; Valouro, Portugal’s main poultry producer holding a 40 percent market share; Acembex, one of the most important grains and proteins distributors in Portugal; and Sovena and Iberol, main biodiesel producers, along with other relevant companies.

USSEC director Bob Metz (center) and ASA vice president Richard Wilkins (right) chat with Victor Nogueira from Group Nogar in Galicia, Spain

USSEC director Bob Metz (center) and ASA vice president Richard Wilkins (right) chat with Victor Nogueira from Group Nogar in Galicia, Spain

Canada Joins ISGA

Monday, April 27, 2015
Category General News 
Soy Canada joined the International Soybean Growers Alliance (ISGA) in March 2015. The ISGA is comprised of growers and industry representatives from countries that…

Soy Canada joined the International Soybean Growers Alliance (ISGA) in March 2015.

The ISGA is comprised of growers and industry representatives from countries that supply over 95 percent of the world’s soybean production. Member countries from North and South America share a commitment to meet increasing world demand for quality and healthy soy products produced in a sustainable and environmentally friendly manner. The ISGA comes together to oppose market restrictions and scientifically unsound non-tariff barriers.

Soy Canada is the national commodity association representing all components of the soybean supply chain in Canada including producer associations from all soybean growing regions, exporters, processors and seed developers. The association’s mandate includes maintaining and expanding market access, opening new markets, increasing the profile of the soybean industry, and strengthening relationships among stakeholders and governments.

According to Soy Canada’s executive director Jim Everson, the organization “supports the broad objectives of the ISGA in communicating the economic and social sustainability of the soybean supply chain and pursuing predictable and open trade and science-based policies and regulation internationally.”

U.S. Soy Grower Leaders Hold Media Teleconference about ISGA’s Mission to China

Monday, April 27, 2015
Category General News 
USSEC chairman Laura Foell, United Soybean Board (USB) chairman Bob Haselwood, and American Soybean Association (ASA) chairman Wade Cowan hosted a media teleconference…

USSEC chairman Laura Foell, United Soybean Board (USB) chairman Bob Haselwood, and American Soybean Association (ASA) chairman Wade Cowan hosted a media teleconference on April 23 to discuss their activities on behalf of the International Soy Growers Alliance (ISGA) in China.

Representatives of the U.S. Soy family prepare for the conference call about the ISGA mission to China.  Clockwise from bottom:  USSEC CEO Jim Sutter (with laptop); ASA Chairman Wade Cowan; USB Chairman Bob Haselwood; USSEC Regional Director – North Asia Paul Burke; USSEC Country Director – China Xiaoping Zhang (standing); and USSEC Chairman Laura Foell

Representatives of the U.S. Soy family prepare for the conference call about the ISGA mission to China. Clockwise from bottom: USSEC CEO Jim Sutter (with laptop); ASA Chairman Wade Cowan; USB Chairman Bob Haselwood; USSEC Regional Director – North Asia Paul Burke; USSEC Country Director – China Xiaoping Zhang (standing); and USSEC Chairman Laura Foell

The ISGA, according to Ms. Foell, is a united front that represents 90 percent of the world’s soybean exports. She said that the group, composed of growers and industry representatives from Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Paraguay, and the U.S., met with Chinese buyers, government officials and influencers during its second mission to China to discuss the importance of timely, science-based approvals for biotech soybeans.

Ms. Foell stressed the importance of the white paper that the coalition had brought to their Chinese partners demonstrating the economic impacts of slow biotech approvals on producers and consumers. The white paper’s data helps put a value on the problems caused by biotech approval systems that are not based on science. China has recently slowed their approval process and the paper is intended to “help them understand that impact,” said Ms. Foell, adding that a three-year approval delay could cost $19 billion for producers and consumers, noting that consumers will bear about 70 percent of the cost.

“A blip in the production chain negatively impacts consumers more than producers,” said Mr. Cowan.

Mr. Haselwood added that it is difficult to put a value on cost. “How willing would biotech companies be to put money into new events if there are so many delays?” he asked.

The grower leaders said that because there is so much consumer resistance to biotech in China, ways to educate the Chinese public are crucial.

U.S. Soy’s Moms to China program is already in place to reach out to social media bloggers, who are influencers of popular opinion, and Ms. Foell said the program would also like to feature South American farmers. Another educational piece in the works is a website in Mandarin, which will showcase U.S. farmers and their work.

Mr. Haselwood said that the ISGA partnership looks for opportunities to gain approvals of biotech events and the success of GMOs in general. “It will take all of us to meet China’s demand,” he stated.

Mr. Cowan stressed the importance of coming together with international partners from South America, saying, “We face similar obstacles as producers.” He said that presenting a “united message to face problems in ag” such as freedom to trade, genetic modification and sustainability is key. He continued, “Unity leads to increased production, productivity and profits.”

U.S. Soy Delegates Participate in ISGA Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade

Monday, April 27, 2015
Category General News 
U.S. grower leaders were represented by USSEC chairman Laura Foell, American Soybean Association (ASA) chairman Wade Cowan and United Soybean Board (USB) chairman…

U.S. grower leaders were represented by USSEC chairman Laura Foell, American Soybean Association (ASA) chairman Wade Cowan and United Soybean Board (USB) chairman Bob Haselwood at the ISGA Forum Plenary Session in Beijing on April 21.

An audience members asks a question during the 2015 Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade.

An audience members asks a question during the 2015 Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade.

ISGA’s white paper, “The Potential Economic Impacts of Delayed Biotech Innovation in Soybeans,” detailing the global implications of biotech approval delays to soy production and supply and demand were presented. Discussions included the consequences of biotech approval delays to China as well as to global producers and consumers of soy.

As a unified statement for a streamlined approval process, ambassadors from each IGSA member country in attendance addressed the forum.

U.S. Ambassador Max Baucus (center) talks with audience members during a break.

U.S. Ambassador Max Baucus (center) talks with audience members during a break.

“I urge everyone here to share notes, share ideas and ask questions,” Max Baucus U.S. Ambassador to China, said. “We need to continue to develop soybean production, soybean consumption and the food needs of the this world.”

Members of the Chinese media talk to representatives of the International Soy Growers Alliance at the conclusion of the 2015 Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade.

Members of the Chinese media talk to representatives of the International Soy Growers Alliance at the conclusion of the 2015 Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade.

Members of the Chinese media in attendance at the forum were able to ask questions of all forum speakers and representatives from each of the ISGA countries. Many forum participants echoed the fact that the increased regulatory process has stifled innovation and costs nearly $136 million for discovery, development and authorization of a new biotech crop. ISGA members hope that information provided at the forum combined with the white paper will help spread the truth about biotechnology crops while easing Chinese consumers’ fears about biotechnology.

A large crowd listens to speakers at the 2015 Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade in Beijing, China last week.

A large crowd listens to speakers at the 2015 Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade in Beijing, China last week.

After the forum, the team met with media at a reception.

ISGA Presents White Paper at Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade in China

Monday, April 27, 2015
Category General News 
The International Soy Growers Alliance (ISGA) released a new white paper at the day long Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade in Beijing on April 23. About 100 Chinese…

The International Soy Growers Alliance (ISGA) released a new white paper at the day long Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade in Beijing on April 23. About 100 Chinese agriculture, state and industry representatives attended the forum.

Members of the International Soy Growers Alliance talk before the start of the 2015 Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade last week in Beijing China. Pictured from left: Lloyd Day, Alex Utida, Laura Foell, Wade Cowan and Bob Haselwood.

Members of the International Soy Growers Alliance talk before the start of the 2015 Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade last week in Beijing China. Pictured from left: Lloyd Day, Alex Utida, Laura Foell, Wade Cowan and Bob Haselwood.

On the ISGA’s second mission to China, grower leaders from the United States, Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay met with Chinese governmental officials and influencers to discuss the economic implications of these delays for global producers and consumers of soy.

The white paper that was discussed at the forum and released to those in attendance is called “The Potential Economic Impacts of Delayed Biotech Innovation in Soybeans” and was developed in conjunction with ISGA members and written by researchers Nicholas Kalaitzandonakes, Kenneth Zahringer and John Kruse at the University of Missouri.

The peer-reviewed white paper details the benefits of genetically modified (GM) crops for countries that accept them while also documenting the economic impact of delays in regulatory approval, showing that a three-year postponement in global approval of biotech-enhanced soybean traits any time in the next 10 years would cost farmers and consumers a total of nearly $19 billion, compared with typical approval timelines.

Alex Utida, Director of the Brazilian Soya Association, talks with other members of the IGSA about meetings conducted with the State Administration of Grain in China. Utida, like other members of the ISGA, relayed his frustrations of the slow biotech approval process in China and how new technology is needed to have better and more effective weed and insect control to produce quality soybeans at a lower price.

Alex Utida, Director of the Brazilian Soya Association, talks with other members of the IGSA about meetings conducted with the State Administration of Grain in China. Utida, like other members of the ISGA, relayed his frustrations of the slow biotech approval process in China and how new technology is needed to have better and more effective weed and insect control to produce quality soybeans at a lower price.

Farmers in large soy-exporting countries that quickly adopt new technology — the U.S., Brazil and Argentina — and consumers in large importing countries —China and the nations in the European Union — have the most to lose from delayed approvals, according to the white paper.

As an example of important biotech approvals that farmers might need in the near future, the study examined herbicide-tolerance traits and analyzed the effects of approval delays through 2025.

Regulatory delays have real and measurable costs for society. For example, when new biotech herbicide-tolerant varieties are not approved in a timely manner, farmers continue to incur increased weed-control costs, potential yield losses and reductions in acreage. Some farmers may see greatly increased production costs or be forced out of farming entirely. At the same time, higher prices and reduced supplies strain consumers.

USSEC chairman Laura Foell took part in the ISGA mission. “In 2014 we (ISGA) commissioned this white paper. We wanted something we could use to show people the economic impact of slow approvals. This is scientifically peer-reviewed and not just hearsay,” she said. “When we are visiting with industry representatives and government agencies it will bring to light the economic and cultural impact that slow approvals have.”

Wade Cowan, President of the American Soybean Association, provides closing comments for the 2015 Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade.

Wade Cowan, President of the American Soybean Association, provides closing comments for the 2015 Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade.

“We can’t allow non-scientific opinions to drive the day,” said American Soybean Association (ASA) chairman Wade Cowan. “We’re all in favor of a level playing field and we need to work together to let each market find its level. When you come together in a forum like this you can’t play country against country. The message doesn’t hold water anymore when we’re all in the same room.”

Bob Haselwood, Chairman of the United Soybean Board, talks about the ISGA’s mission to strengthen the partnership with Chinese industries to help address China’s food security, food safety and sustainable food supply. The ISGA represents 95 percent of the world’s export supply of soybeans.

Bob Haselwood, Chairman of the United Soybean Board, talks about the ISGA’s mission to strengthen the partnership with Chinese industries to help address China’s food security, food safety and sustainable food supply. The ISGA represents 95 percent of the world’s export supply of soybeans.

“Ultimately, you hope that any work done here will speed up the approval process,” Bob Haselwood, United Soybean Board (USB) chair added. “I think that the cooperation we have with our South American partners will make the Chinese officials stop and think that they are going to have to work with us as a group instead of individually and I think that is a good thing.”

“The economic benefits from the adoption of new soybean varieties will be large,” Lloyd Day, deputy director general of the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture (IICA) told the group while discussing the white paper. “If new traits are delayed in reaching the market they will not only impact farmers and seed developers, but also restrict consumer access to adequate nutrition.”

An issues brief was also developed to summarize this white paper. Ms. Foell, Mr. Cowan and Mr. Haselwood will be participating in the National Association of Farm Broadcasting (NAFB)’s annual Washington Watch from April 27-29. The event is held each spring in Washington, D.C and gives NAFB members the opportunity to hear from agriculture organizations, officials from the United States Department of Agriculture and leadership of the U.S. House and Senate.

USSEC Participates in ISGA’s Second Mission to China

Monday, April 27, 2015
Category General News 
USSEC participated in the International Soy Growers Alliance (ISGA)’s second mission to China from April 20-23. USSEC chairman Laura Foell, American Soybean Association…

USSEC participated in the International Soy Growers Alliance (ISGA)’s second mission to China from April 20-23. USSEC chairman Laura Foell, American Soybean Association (ASA) chairman Wade Cowan and United Soybean Board (USB) chairman Bob Haselwood traveled to Beijing, along with USSEC CEO Jim Sutter, USSEC Marketing Director – Market Access/ Freedom to Trade (FTO) Rosalind Leeck and USSEC consultant Pablo Adreani. They joined farmers from Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay as a united front through the ISGA.

Rodolfo Rossi (left) and Pedro Vigneau greet dignitaries as they arrive for the beginning of the 2015 Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade last week in Beijing, China. A white paper was released at the meeting detailing the global implications of biotechnology approval delays to soy production, supply and demand.

Rodolfo Rossi (left) and Pedro Vigneau greet dignitaries as they arrive for the beginning of the 2015 Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade last week in Beijing, China. A white paper was released at the meeting detailing the global implications of biotechnology approval delays to soy production, supply and demand.

The ISGA is comprised of growers and industry representatives from countries that supply over 95 percent of the world’s soybean production. Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Paraguay, Uruguay and the U.S. share a commitment to meet rapidly increasing world demand for quality and healthy soy products produced in a sustainable and environmentally-friendly manner. The ISGA is a single voice in opposing market restrictions and scientifically unsound non-tariff barriers to trade relating to health, environmental, chemical residues and biotechnology approvals, working to develop best agricultural and environmentally friendly practices for the entire feed and food chain.

International Soy Growers Alliance members, ambassadors and Chinese representatives pose for a group photo at the 2015 Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade.

International Soy Growers Alliance members, ambassadors and Chinese representatives pose for a group photo at the 2015 Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade.

 

“It’s no secret that soy is part of a global market,” stated Mr. Haselwood. “We need a coordinated effort across North America, South America and China to work toward timely international approvals for new biotech traits to grow a safe, reliable and abundant food supply that is profitable for both producers and consumers.”

On April 21, the U.S. Soy team participated in the ISGA Forum Plenary Session where ISGA’s white paper, “The Potential Economic Impacts of Delayed Biotech Innovation in Soybeans” was presented. The next day, ISGA teams met with targeted Chinese governmental agencies to deliver the white paper, additionally meeting with ISGA members’ embassies. On the final day, an ISGA debrief and planning meeting was held where teams reported on their meetings with Chinese embassies and discussed future messages, strategies and ISGA activities in China. USSEC gave a presentation on a proposed joint ISGA project and talked about its American Professional Farm Women in China programs and its American Soy Farm website.

Lloyd Day, Deputy Director General, of the Inter-American institute on Agriculture Cooperation, presents the ISGA White Paper on the Global Implications of Biotechnology Approval Delays to Soy Production, Supply and Demand.

Lloyd Day, Deputy Director General, of the Inter-American institute on Agriculture Cooperation, presents the ISGA White Paper on the Global Implications of Biotechnology Approval Delays to Soy Production, Supply and Demand.

“The global supply chain is a powerful economic engine that benefits not only farmers and consumers, but stakeholders at each stage in between,” declared Mr. Cowan. “It is a point of pride for U.S. soybean farmers that the beans we grow produce an entire secondary economy of jobs in the U.S. and in each of our export markets. We’re also proud that our beans play such a key role in supporting economies as their citizens demand more meat protein, as is the case in China. Those benefits, however, can’t take place if the approvals process breaks down, and that’s why we’re over here, working to ensure that we have a system that works for both the Chinese and their import partners in the U.S. and South America.”

China leads the world as the largest soybean market and continues to be a growing market for U.S. Soy, consuming a total of 76.2 million metric tons (MMT) of soybeans in FY13, of which 59.9 MMT were imported from North and South America, accounting for 62.8 percent of the world’s soybean trade. China is also the largest importer of U.S. soybeans, purchasing 21.5 MMT of U.S. soybeans, accounting for 26.1 percent of U.S. soybean production in FY13 and 59.4 percent of total U.S. soybean exports. China imported a total of 1.41 MMT of soybean oil, accounting for 16.6 percent of world soybean oil trade, making China also the number one U.S. soybean oil importer with a total purchase of 207 thousand tons in FY13, which represented 22.1 percent of total U.S. soybean oil exports.

Laura Foell, chairman of USSEC, greets U.S. Ambassador Max Baucus before the start of the 2015 Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade. Baucus and ambassadors from Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay spoke to those in attendance.

Laura Foell, chairman of USSEC, greets U.S. Ambassador Max Baucus before the start of the 2015 Forum on Biotechnology and Global Soy Trade. Baucus and ambassadors from Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay spoke to those in attendance.

Ms. Foell concluded, “Timely, science-based approvals are crucial in ensuring increased productivity to meet global supply demands. This mission provided an opportunity for the world’s largest soy producers and consumers to learn that resolving approval delays will benefit everyone along the supply chain.”

USSEC Commissions Independent Study on International Marketing

Monday, April 20, 2015
Category General News 
USSEC recently commissioned an independent study of producer return from the international marketing efforts of U.S. soy which includes checkoff and USDA funding.…

USSEC recently commissioned an independent study of producer return from the international marketing efforts of U.S. soy which includes checkoff and USDA funding. The study concluded that international market promotion has significantly boosted U.S. soybean industry profitability under the management of USSEC and its predecessor organizations.

The evaluation, which used an econometric simulation model of world soybean and soybean product markets dating back more than 20 years, was conducted by Dr. Gary Williams, Professor of Agricultural Economics and Co-Director of the Agribusiness, Food and Consumer Economics Research Center of Texas A&M University in 2014. According to the study, international marketing activities conducted on behalf of U.S. soybean growers increased soybean exports each year by an average of 993,600 metric tons (MT) or nearly 5 percent. For soybean meal and soybean oil, the average annual growth over that period was estimated to be somewhat larger at 15 percent (808,600 MT) and 24 percent (149,600 MT) respectively.

Using those results, Dr. Williams calculated a gross export revenue benefit-cost ratio (BCR) over the period reviewed of $29.6 of additional export revenue (net of the cost of the promotion) per dollar spent on international promotion. At the producer level, that additional export revenue translates into a BCR of $10.1 in additional profit to growers (net of both additional production costs and the cost of promotion) per dollar spent on international promotion.

The study took into account the funds invested by the soy checkoff (national and state) as well as U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) matching funds and third-party contributions. Based on the BCR calculated by Dr. Williams for all funding, including cost-share and third party contributions, USSEC estimates that for every checkoff dollar contributed by the producers, the international marketing activities returned additional revenue of $74.5 and additional profit to the growers of $23.2. Since the USDA cost-share and third-party contributions are dependent upon checkoff funding, the total return to farmers is amplified by the other funding sources. The independent, third party study weighed investments from funding sources dating back more than 20 years.

Dr. Williams concluded that the international market promotion component of the soybean checkoff program has generated over $20 billion in additional export revenue since 1980/81 with a BCR of $34.8 per dollar spent on international promotion, over $6.2 billion in additional soybean grower profits since 1980/81 with a producer BCR of $10.1 in producer profit per dollar spent on international promotion.

Soybean checkoff investments in international market promotion have enhanced the international competitiveness of the U.S. Soy industry and increased the global market share of U.S. soybean and product exports and have boosted imports of soybeans and soybean products around the world , particularly by China and many smaller, less-developed countries.

Read the study here:

Return to Soybean Checkoff International Market Promotion 2014