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News: Greater Europe

USSEC’s European Mission Focuses on Sustainability, Collaboration

Monday, October 31, 2016
Category General News Greater Europe Sustainability 
USSEC attended a series of events and meetings in Europe from October 16-20. USSEC consultant David Green of the U.S. Sustainability Alliance and USSEC Project Manager…

USSEC attended a series of events and meetings in Europe from October 16-20.

USSEC consultant David Green of the U.S. Sustainability Alliance and USSEC Project Manager – Market Access/FTO Katie Williams attended SIAL Paris (a major international food exhibition) and the U.N’s Committee on World Food Security event in Rome, in addition to conducting one-on-one meetings in Brussels, Belgium and Dordrecht, Netherlands.

“During SIAL Paris and our meetings in Brussels and Rome, David and I were able to have face to face meetings with contacts from various Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) offices, retailers, food processors, and others,” stated Ms. Williams. “During these conversations, we were able to discern that European retailers are extremely interested in sustainability and recognize the potential for collaboration.”

David Green speaks at the SIAL TV panel on sustainability. Mr. Green made several key points to participants, explaining that 95 percent of U.S farms are family farms; that innovations such as precision ag, GPS, and drones reduce mass irrigation; and discussed challenges to Innovation

David Green speaks at the SIAL TV panel on sustainability. Mr. Green made several key points to participants, explaining that 95 percent of U.S farms are family farms; that innovations such as precision ag, GPS, and drones reduce
mass irrigation; and discussed challenges to Innovation

Changing mindsets takes time. The successes of the Global Broad-based Initiative (GBI) program over the past two years are steps in the right direction, says Ms. Williams. Ongoing dialogue and communication with contacts made to date and with new stakeholders was appreciated by EU stakeholders. This base of contacts will be leveraged and built on to further improve the understanding and appreciation of the reality of sustainability and conservation in the U.S. The sustainability and conservation production processes used in U.S. agriculture, forestry, and fishery products are viewed positively by European audiences following outreach, education and information exchange on missions such as the above.

In Rome, the USSEC delegation attended the Committee of World Food Security

In Rome, the USSEC delegation attended the Committee of World Food Security

USSEC’s participation helps communicate to European audiences that U.S. agriculture and industry is sustainable and that many cooperators participate in the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) conservation schemes. Also, the fact that some 95 percent of farms in the U.S. are family farms and that the U.S. has been enacting conservation laws and policies for more than 100 years were two points which were both new and enlightening to the European audience.

David Green and Laurent Journo of FAS Paris tend to the USDA booth at SIAL Paris 2016. USSA's pop-up posters are prominently displayed and cooperator fact sheets line the front table

David Green and Laurent Journo of FAS Paris tend to the USDA booth at SIAL Paris 2016. USSA’s pop-up posters are prominently displayed and cooperator fact sheets line the front table

Organic Trade Association, a USSA cooperator, had fact sheets in 5 languages

Organic Trade Association, a USSA cooperator, had fact sheets in 5 languages

An example of a booth with their sustainability messaging prominently displayed. Its scheme is also voluntary.

An example of a booth with their sustainability messaging prominently displayed. Its scheme is also voluntary.

IAFN Member List

IAFN Member List

Sustainable Development Goals Session at the IAFN

Sustainable Development Goals Session

Genetic Diversity on  on Food Security and Nutrition: this session focused on specific genetic traits of food. With regards to animal utilization, people who eat the entire animal have better nutrition and micronutrient profiles.

Genetic Diversity on on Food Security and Nutrition: this session focused on specific genetic traits of food. With regards to animal utilization, people who eat the entire animal have better nutrition and micronutrient profiles.

USSEC Hosts Special Session on SSAP at Consumer Goods Forum’s Sustainable Retail Summit in Paris

Monday, October 31, 2016
Category General News Greater Europe Sustainability 
At the recent Consumer Goods Forum’s Sustainable Retail Summit in Paris, USSEC sponsored a special breakout session focused on sustainable U.S. Soy. Brent Babb, USSEC…

At the recent Consumer Goods Forum’s Sustainable Retail Summit in Paris, USSEC sponsored a special breakout session focused on sustainable U.S. Soy.

Brent Babb, USSEC Regional Director – EU/MENA opened the session by providing an overview of USSEC and the history and range of conservation efforts undertaken by U.S. producers. Mr. Babb described the four pillars of the U.S. Sustainable Soy Assurance Protocol (SSAP) – biodiversity and high carbon stock, production practices, health and welfare, and continuous improvement – while noting that to date, certificates have been issued for almost six million tons of U.S. Soy exports.

USSEC Regional Director – EU/MENA Brent Babb and USB director Nancy Kavazanjian speak with Rhonda O’Kelly of the Consumer Goods Forum

USSEC Regional Director – EU/MENA Brent Babb and USB director Nancy Kavazanjian speak with Rhonda O’Kelly of the Consumer Goods Forum

United Soybean Board (USB) director Nancy Kavazanjian spoke about the conservation efforts on her fourth generation family farm in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. Ms. Kavazanjian noted that conservation measures, such as no-till and cover crops, reduce soil erosion and improve soil quality, demonstrating her family’s commitment to continuous improvement, a key aspect of sustainable production.

Dr. Marty Matlock of the University of Arkansas spoke about the metrics and indicators collected and used to measure advancements toward the agreed upon sustainability goals for U.S. soybean producers. Dr. Matlock elaborated on the continuous improvement efforts and noted the commitment by U.S. Soy producers to continue their sustainability drive as measured by the five key indicators of land use, water and energy use, soil erosion, and greenhouse gas emissions.

The conference brought together a wide range of businesses along the food value chain, including CEOs from major European retailers. The USSEC delegation engaged with the conference participants and explained how the SSAP relates to the Consumer Goods Forum’s sustainable soy sourcing guidelines and USSEC’s efforts to promote and inform key European contacts on the SSAP.

USSEC Supports Polish U.S. Bypass Soybean Meal Importer and Distributor by Providing On-Farm Dairy Training

Monday, October 31, 2016
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
USSEC recently provided a dairy program to key Polish dairy farmers, managers and nutrition advisors. The first phase of the two-phase activity, featured in the U.S.…

USSEC recently provided a dairy program to key Polish dairy farmers, managers and nutrition advisors. The first phase of the two-phase activity, featured in the U.S. Soy News on October 18, was a dairy nutrition and management seminar for industry members from all over Poland. Phase two was an on-farm dairy training, organized jointly with the Polish importer and distributor of AminoPlus® bypass soybean meal.

Dr. Lynn Davis (second from right), with language help from Jerzy Kosieradzki (right), worked on the feeding of high producing dairy cows with managers P. Wnuk and M. Zaremba and Etos nutrition advisors at RSP Bądecz

Dr. Lynn Davis (second from right), with language help from Jerzy Kosieradzki (right), worked on the feeding of high producing dairy cows with managers P. Wnuk and M. Zaremba and Etos nutrition advisors at RSP Bądecz

Two experts were invited to Poland to work with the local dairy industry: Dr. Lynn Davis, Nutrition Professionals Inc., of Neenah, Wisconsin, and Dr. Jan van Eys, GANS and USSEC consultant, of Paris, France. Drs. Davis and van Eys were supported by USSEC Northeast Europe Technical Director Jerzy Kosieradzki and Piotr Chełminiak, Dairy Feed Department Manager at the ETOS feed company. The team spent a week visiting farms in the western part of Poland to provide their ideas for improvements of the local dairy feeding programs and managerial practices. Their opinions and ideas for adjustments were given to the local farmers and staff responsible for nutrition, health, breeding and management of the dairy herds. Whenever needed, feedstuffs samples were taken and sent to ETOS feed company’s laboratory to be thoroughly analyzed and a follow-up visit to the farms will be made later by the Polish company’s dairy nutrition advisors.

Deep investigation of a farm’s feed storage is a bottom line for every nutritionist. Here, Dr. van Eys comments on local corn silage quality at a dairy farm in Czechnów

Deep investigation of a farm’s feed storage is a bottom line for every nutritionist. Here, Dr. Jan van Eys comments on local corn silage quality at a dairy farm in Czechnów

Concerning AminoPlus® usage, the team encountered situations where the U.S. bypass soybean meal was successfully used, such as at a dairy farm at Godziątków, owned by the Jaworowicz family. The imported meal contributed to their high milk production, which was close to 12,000 liters per cow annually, in this large operation. There were also farms where the managers forced too many ingredients into the diet optimization software or introduced too many restrictions, causing elimination of AminoPlus® from the actual feeding. Each time the explanation was same: the bypass meal is just too expensive! In these cases, either Dr. Davis or Dr. van Eys had to remove the unjustified restrictions and let the computer choose optimal ingredients at optimal levels and, believe or not, AminoPlus® always found a place in the diet.

At GHR Gąsiorek/Agro-Sokołowo, the USSEC expert worked with Michał Gąsiorek, owner and managing director; first from right, at their feedstuffs processing plant that includes a dry extrusion line

At GHR Gąsiorek/Agro-Sokołowo, the USSEC expert worked with Michał Gąsiorek, owner and managing director, at their feedstuffs processing plant that includes a dry extrusion line

At each location, locally available protein-rich ingredients and additives were discussed and tips for their utilization were shared with the farmers. Nutritional values of soybean meal as compared to the other protein sources were also checked and often-helpful adjustments were proposed.

AminoPlus® bypass meal was used at a couple of farms the USSEC training team worked at; at Godziątków dairy farm, the meal was being loaded to a feed mixing truck

AminoPlus® bypass meal was used at a couple of farms the USSEC training team worked at; at Godziątków dairy farm, the meal was being loaded to a feed mixing truck

While most of the work done by the USSEC consultants concentrated on high yielding dairy cows, they also paid attention to how calves and replacement heifers are fed and managed. As the future of the dairy operations, the young-stock required better housing and feeding, which was not always easy to follow in a long period of very low profitability in the Polish dairy sector. Only the smartest farmers were making such an investment in the next generation of their milking cows.

Andrzej Jaworowicz (owner and managing director at Godziątków dairy farm, first from left, was one of the most diligent trainees at the program; Dr. Lynn Davis (first from right) discussed with him the many aspects of a successful dairy cow nutrition program

Andrzej Jaworowicz (owner and managing director at Godziątków dairy farm, left) was one of the most diligent trainees at the program; Dr. Davis (right) discussed with him the many aspects of a successful dairy cow nutrition program

USSEC Supports U.S. Bypass Soymeal Importer & Distributor In Poland – Dairy Nutrition & Management Seminar

Monday, October 17, 2016
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
While USSEC ‘s marketing program in Poland focuses mainly on working with poultry and swine feed manufacturing industries, the dairy sector has not been overlooked…

While USSEC ‘s marketing program in Poland focuses mainly on working with poultry and swine feed manufacturing industries, the dairy sector has not been overlooked as offering considerable potential to use U.S. soybean Hi-Pro meal and bypass meal as well.

In FY16, USSEC combined financial and human resources with a Polish feed compounder and feedstuff distributor, ETOS, to organize a dairy nutrition and management seminar, which was attended by almost 70 dairy growers and managers from many provinces.

The main speakers at the seminar were Dr. Jan van Eys, USSEC contractor based in France, and Dr. Lynn Davis, Nutrition Professionals Inc. of Neenah, Wisconsin.

Dr. van Eys spoke about amino acids and energy requirements of high yielding dairy cows, concentrating on the transition period

Dr. van Eys spoke about amino acids and energy requirements of high yielding dairy cows, concentrating on the transition period

 

Dr. van Eys explained the feeding of dairy cows during the so-called transition period (four weeks before calving and for another few weeks after calving) that plays a critical role in the cows’ milk production, health, reproduction and length of their productive life. Dr. Davis, who has worked for 30 years as a nutritional advisor to commercial dairies in Wisconsin and Colorado and co-owns three dairy farms in Wisconsin, discussed the management of dairy farms. Dr. Davis’s second presentation focused on staying ahead of the curve by adapting to evolving farm environment.

Polish dairy managers paid full attention to presented cutting edge dairy nutrition and management know-how gathered at U.S. and European research institutions and industries

Polish dairy managers paid full attention to presented cutting edge dairy nutrition and management know-how gathered at U.S. and European research institutions and industries

 

Other presentations were offered by local experts, including Marcin Winkowski of DSM-Poland and Piotr Chełminiak of ETOS, who highlighted nutritional products and services that contribute to the improved feeding efficiency of various components and overall success in a dairy operation. Quality control and assurance system was another important topic covered at the seminar, partially in the conference room and partially at ETOS’s feedstuff quality control laboratory, where Małgorzata Jędrzejczak, head of the lab, explained what the company does for their clients. The principles and benefits of GMP+ quality assurance system that is in place at ETOS were also presented to the visitors.

Dr. Lynn Davis (left) shared information on many practical issues, including the consequences of some nutritional and managerial mistakes in overall farm production efficiency and profitability; consecutive translation was provided by Jerzy W. Kosieradzki, USSEC Technical Director, Northeast Europe (right)

Dr. Lynn Davis (left) shared information on many practical issues, including the consequences of some nutritional and managerial mistakes in overall farm production efficiency and profitability; consecutive translation was provided by Jerzy W. Kosieradzki, USSEC Technical Director, Northeast Europe (right)

 

After the seminar, USSEC followed up with participants about their impressions and evaluation of the completed seminar and received positive opinions from the vast majority of attendees. Małgorzata Lisiecka, co-owner and manager of a 1200 head dairy complex at Czechnów in the western part of Poland said, “It was a very useful event and learning from the two experienced foreign experts allowed us to pick up some smart ideas we can implement in our operation. Like the software Dr. Davis recommended to us to use to monitor the time cows spend on various things during the day – this simple tool and approach has potential to save money.”

The participants and trainers visited ETOS feed company’s feedstuffs quality laboratory, which helped explain some testing methodologies used to evaluate nutritional value and quality of their feedstuffs as well as compound feeds and additives manufactured by ETOS to the dairy growers and herd managers

The participants and trainers visited ETOS feed company’s feedstuffs quality laboratory, which helped explain some testing methodologies used to evaluate nutritional value and quality of their feedstuffs as well as compound feeds and additives manufactured by ETOS to the dairy growers and herd managers

 

Piotr Chełminiak, manager of ETOS dairy feed department, took the last short portion of the in-class session to present on the nutritional products manufactured and/or distributed by his company, including AGP’s AminoPlus® bypass soybean meal; he also explained the services that a reliable feed supplier offers to dairies

Piotr Chełminiak, manager of ETOS dairy feed department, took the last short portion of the in-class session to present on the nutritional products manufactured and/or distributed by his company, including AGP’s AminoPlus® bypass soybean meal; he also explained the services that a reliable feed supplier offers to dairies

USSEC Hosts Eastern European Customers for Practical Training During Swine Nutrition Course

Monday, October 17, 2016
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
USSEC recently held practical training for eastern European customers, on the heels of its three-day in-class swine nutrition and management course held in Spain (see…

USSEC recently held practical training for eastern European customers, on the heels of its three-day in-class swine nutrition and management course held in Spain (see U.S. Soy News, October 11, 2016, for more information on that portion of the seminar). The two to three days of practical training was held at farms, feed mills, research facilities, providers of commercial services to farmers and manufacturers, suppliers of ingredients and additives, and quality control laboratories.

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Training at Garese feed mill, Pinillos de Polendos, focused on quality assurance procedures on a background of the whole mill operations

 

Having completed their intensive theoretical training in Madrid, customers from Poland, Belarus, Romania, Czech Republic and Russia toured the many swine producing and feed manufacturing sites scattered in various places in Spain. While accompanied by two key trainers, USSEC consultants Dr. Gonzalo G. Mateos and Dr. Juan Acedo-Rico, the trainees had the opportunity to speak with the many commercial specialists at the operations visited and check with them on how various procedures and technological solutions work in a day-to-day reality.

The organizers of the practical training were truly impressed by the diligence of many students. At Garese feed mill, it was Aleksandr (Sasha) Akinin, Head of Quality Department of the giant JSC “Cherkizovo –Kormoproizvodstvo” in Russia, who investigated feed safety and quality at every stage of the mill tour

The organizers of the practical training were truly impressed by the diligence of many students. At Garese feed mill, it was Aleksandr (Sasha) Akinin, Head of Quality Department of the giant JSC “Cherkizovo –Kormoproizvodstvo” in Russia, who investigated feed safety and quality at every stage of the mill tour

 

At COBADU cooperative, Dr. Eduardo Bueno, Chief of Nutrition, led the group around the coop’s feedstuffs drying and initial processing facilities, feed mill making feeds for monogastric animals, ruminant feed mill, feedstuff warehouses and quality control lab and answered a multitude of the participants’ questions. Dr. Rafael Sanchez, General Manger, explained to them the economic and productive system the cooperative uses in its business.

At Proinserga feed mill, Zarzuela del Pinar, making only swine feeds, the Romanian trainees studied every piece of equipment and all technological solutions. Dr. Juan Acedo-Rico never tired while explaining all the details

At Proinserga feed mill, Zarzuela del Pinar, making only swine feeds, the Romanian trainees studied every piece of equipment and all technological solutions. Dr. Juan Acedo-Rico never tired of explaining all the details

 

Visiting CEP experimental swine farm, a 500-sow unit, the eastern European customers were hosted by Joaquin Morales, Veterinarian in Charge, who explained the farm’s technological set-up and some studies run by the institution as a service to the industry. 3F company (Feeds & Foods Factory), was another case, where the group was hosted by Dr. Mario Garcia, one of the lecturers at the seminar completed earlier in the week, who showed them around the plant that makes livestock nutritional products out of organic acid, enzymes and other liquid additives and explained the practical aspects of such products utilization in swine diets.

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At 3F plant, Palma de Malorca, Avila region, manufacturing organic acids nutritional products used in pig and poultry diets, Dr. Mario Garcia explained how this super modern factory ensures their products stick 100 percent to the ordered formulas; worker and user safety was another important topic

 

At every stage of the practical training part of the course, the trainers pointed out the nutritional and economic aspects of optimal utilization of soybean products in livestock production with a special focus on swine production in which Spain holds the number one position in Europe. At COBADU, the students could see soybean extrusion operation and learn about the benefits gained by the local farmers, who feed it to their livestock.

Training at Garese feed mill, Pinillos de Polendos, focused on quality assurance procedures on a background of the whole mill operations

Training at Garese feed mill, Pinillos de Polendos, focused on quality assurance procedures on a background of the whole mill operations

USSEC Supports Romanian Feed Industry in Adoption of NIRS, Microscopy Technologies

Monday, October 10, 2016
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
In early September, USSEC held a one-day seminar, “Near Infrared Spectroscopy and Feed Microscopy,” in Bucharest, Romania, with the aim to support the Romanian…

In early September, USSEC held a one-day seminar, “Near Infrared Spectroscopy and Feed Microscopy,” in Bucharest, Romania, with the aim to support the Romanian feed industry to adopt Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) and microscopy technologies as tools for quality control and to detect potential adulteration of raw materials and feeds.

Quality control representatives, feed mill managers, and nutritionists from Romania attended the event and showed great interest in learning more about how to properly interpret the statistic results from NIRS analysis and how to implement qualitative analysis of soybean meals of different origins.

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Dr. Paloma Rebollar, professor at the University Politecnica of Madrid, Spain demonstrates how NIR helps the nutritionists to understand the value of soybean meals of different origins

“Great care should be taken in developing NIRS calibrations as problems can arise when the primary methods do not define well the chemical constituent, and sample preparation is not as consistent as required,” Dr. Paloma Rebollar, professor at the University Politecnica in Madrid, Spain, emphasized at the seminar. “Besides proximal composition analysis, NIRS can be used for determining metabolizable energy, protein and phosphorous digestibility, and for the analysis of starch and non-starch polysaccharides, etc. It can be used to identify origin of soybean meals and to perform authenticity checks. In addition, heat damaged protein, fungal contamination and adulteration can be detected with modern pattern recognition software,” she added.

Feed microscopy expert Dr. Roser Sala Paralles of the University Autonoma of Barcelona describes the magnified soybean picture taken under a stereoscopical microscope

Feed microscopy expert Dr. Roser Sala Paralles of the University Autonoma of Barcelona describes the magnified soybean picture taken under a stereoscopical microscope

Dr. Roser Sala Paralles of Univeristy Autonoma in Barcelona, Spain recommended that participants adopt the feed microscopy as a fast and inexpensive quality control tool in their routine laboratory analysis, taking into account compliance with the specific raw materials used in a particular production process and available on the particular market and geographic location, specifically the geographic origin of available soybean meals in the Romanian market.

Prior to the seminar, USSEC organized visits to relevant feed mills and quality control, providing participants with the opportunity of knowing available analytical techniques and current practices used by the Romanian feed quality control labs, and the opportunity to discuss with quality control managers and nutritionists their main concerns on quality, variability and adulteration of soybean meal.

The field visits organized before the event provided an excellent opportunity for USSEC consultants to engage in practical discussions about soybean meal quality with the Romanian colleagues

The field visits organized before the event provided an excellent opportunity for USSEC consultants to engage in practical discussions about soybean meal quality with the Romanian colleagues

The individual meetings with laboratories at the feed mills and with nutritionists and researchers were informative and allowed participants to gain a better understanding of the Romanian feed and livestock’s actual reality and the potential for progress and expansion.

The Romanian feed and livestock industries clearly show the opportunities and potential that exists in this particular market for growth in livestock production and, consequently, the use of U.S. Soy products. Continuous promotional efforts to accompany the growth of this market and positioning of U.S. Soy in this market will be continued.

USSEC Hosted East European Customers At Swine Nutrition Training Course

Monday, October 10, 2016
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
USSEC recently organized a swine nutrition and management training course at the Universidad Polytechnica of Madrid (UPM) in Spain. A group of almost twenty customers…

USSEC recently organized a swine nutrition and management training course at the Universidad Polytechnica of Madrid (UPM) in Spain. A group of almost twenty customers from various Eastern European countries including Poland, Belarus, Czech Republic, Russia and Romania attended. Participants were comprised of technical professionals working at livestock integrators, feed compounders, swine nutrition advisors, feed additive merchandisers and feedstuffs quality control managers.

All students attending the seminar part of the event and some lecturers gathered in front of the Escuela Ingenioros Agronomos of the University Polytechnica Madrid (UPM), where the classes were held

All students attending the seminar part of the event and some lecturers gathered in front of the Escuela Ingenioros Agronomos of the University Polytechnica Madrid (UPM), where the classes were held

USSEC consultant and UPM professor Dr. Gonzalo Mateos organized this educational event and was one of a dozen lecturers involved in it. The speakers were all Spaniards and many of them combined European and U.S. education and commercial expertise. Half of the speakers represented universities and other research institutions and the other half worked for commercial companies operating locally in Spain, other EU countries, or globally.

The program and logistical arrangements were coordinated with three USSEC contractors working in Eastern European countries: Maria Domoroschenkova (Russian Federation), Iani Chihaia (Southeast Europe), and Jerzy Kosieradzki (Northeast Europe). Administrative support from Inspectia & Control, USSEC’s administrative arm in Europe, and USSEC consultant Sule Basa in Turkey was also vital.

The seminar’s agenda covered a wide scope of topics, from pig production and legislation (Dr. Enric Marco); feeding the various genetic lines and production groups of pigs (Dr. Domingo Carrion, Dr. Josep Gasa and Dr. Maria Angeles); nutrition, health and reproduction related matters (Dr. Carlos Pinero, Dr. Edgar Garcia, Dr. Enric Marco); through protein sources in pig diets and feed manufacturing (Dr. Juan Acedo-Rico, Dr. Carlos de Blas); and feedstuffs quality control and assurance programs (Dr. Pedro Mendel). Special highlights included interrelations among feeding programs, nutrition and pathology in pig production, presented by Dr. Edgar Garcia of Teagasc, Ireland, and optimal utilization of soy derived products in feeding of swine, mainly given by Dr. Mateos.

In his presentations, Dr. Enric Marco focused on the use of antibiotics, additives, and vaccination programs

In his presentations, Dr. Enric Marco focused on the use of antibiotics, additives, and vaccination programs

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President of COBADU cooperative, Zamora (first from left – standing), translated by Prof. G. G. Mateos (second from left – standing), main coordinator of the training effort, provided the Eastern European customers with a more in-depth explanations of how the cooperative achieved such a big success in feed and livestock production

Participants expressed their appreciation of the many aspects of the project. “I am so grateful to USSEC and all the persons involved in putting the event together and running it, for having done such a great job. I can honestly state it was the most remarkable training program in my life. I sincerely appreciate the opportunity to attend it. It was also fun to spend a few days at university classrooms some 15 years after my graduation!” stated Mr. Michal Karas of DeHeus feed compounder in the Czech Republic.

President of COBADU cooperative, Zamora (first from left - standing), translated by Prof. G. G. Mateos (second from left – standing), main coordinator of the training effort, provided the Eastern European customers with a more in-depth explanations of how the cooperative achieved such a big success in feed and livestock production

Tasting young piglet meat served for dinner at a very old and famous restaurant was an added bonus for the students and professors

USSEC Organizes Sustainability Tour for European Feed Industry Contacts

Monday, October 3, 2016
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
In late September, USSEC – European Union (EU) organized a “Sustainable Soy” visit to the United States for contacts from the European feed industry. Participants…

In late September, USSEC – European Union (EU) organized a “Sustainable Soy” visit to the United States for contacts from the European feed industry. Participants came from the United Kingdom, France, the Netherlands, Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic. The trip focused on the key elements of the U.S. Sustainable Soy Assurance Protocol (SSAP), particularly the conservation and compliance requirements, and aimed to demonstrate the principles of sustainable soy production in the United States.

Starting in Washington D.C, both the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) provided briefings on their activities and programs and their impact on sustainable agricultural production in the United States. NRCS’s long history of conservation practices and its compliance systems and NASS’s data collection and dissemination both contribute critical elements to the SSAP. The American Soybean Association, the North American Export Grain Association, the National Grain and Feed Association, the Field to Market Alliance, and the American Feed Industry Association all provided detailed briefings on their programs.

State level NRCS offices organized visits to the farms of Mike and Mary Brown in Hartley, Delaware and Mark Eck in Henderson, Maryland where participants saw firsthand conservation practices and activities that improved wildlife habitats, soil erosion and water quality. The group visited historic Annapolis, Maryland before catching a late night flight to Des Moines, Iowa.

In Iowa, State NRCS representatives described their new Resource Stewardship Evaluation (RSE) program, a tool which strengthens and modernizes conservation planning by evaluating current management and conservation activities in the five critical areas of soil management, water quality and quantity, air quality and wildlife habitat, thereby helping producers better identify their conservation goals.

Later, the group visited Iowa State University (ISU) in Ames and received briefings on cutting edge research on water quality activities aimed at reducing nutrient runoff. The group also took a walking art tour of the ISU campus with the highlight being the Grant Wood (“American Gothic”) murals in the university’s library.

The next day was organized in close cooperation with the Iowa Soybean Association (ISA) and started with briefings by their environment staff on the range of their conservation related activities with additional briefing on their research and community outreach efforts. The Iowa Agriculture Water Alliance provided a briefing on their activities to improve water quality and reduce nutrient runoff. The group then visited the farm of Lee Tesdell in Lincoln, Iowa where a number of conservation practices were demonstrated, including a bioreactor used to reduce nitrate levels in runoff water. The group then visited the farm of Rick Kimberley where the highlight was watching the soybean harvest begin. At both farms, the group engaged with the producers, asking questions on various aspects of the operations and gaining critical insights into soybean production, sustainability, conservation measures, the global market situation and current prices and prospects.

The final visit was to the ADM soybean crushing facility in Des Moines. The facility partners with Unilever and Field to Market Alliance in producing soybean oil for a famous brand of mayonnaise. AMD described the process of crushing and refining and their engagement with the 700 local farmers who sustainably produce soybeans for the Field to Market project.

After a busy week, the group provided their initial feedback and impressions, discussed the role of GM soybeans in sustainability, and brainstormed on the next steps in promoting the SSAP and sustainable U.S. Soy to the European market. All participants agreed that, like U.S. farms, no two markets are alike, and USSEC’s promotion and engagement efforts must be tailored to the specific conditions and requirements of each market. Undoubtedly, the participants gained insights into the diversity and richness of U.S. farming, a better understanding of the challenges ahead, and assurances of U.S. producers’ commitment to sustainability and to supplying sustainably produced soybeans to global markets.

U.S. Soy Producers Visit Germany

Monday, September 12, 2016
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
USSEC and ASA director Kevin Scott and USB director Jim Willers visited a dairy farm in Germany on August 11 USSEC and American Soybean Association (ASA) director Kevin…
USSEC and ASA director Kevin Scott and USB director Jim Willers visited a dairy farm in Germany on August 11

USSEC and ASA director Kevin Scott and USB director Jim Willers visited a dairy farm in Germany on August 11

USSEC and American Soybean Association (ASA) director Kevin Scott of Valley Springs, South Dakota and United Soybean Board (USB) director Jim Willers of Beaver Creek, Minnesota, recently visited two farms and a feed mill in Germany. The purpose of the visits was to generate a greater preference for U.S. Soy, to gain insights into the conditions and challenges facing German producers, and to exchange information on a wide range of soy-related issues, including sustainability and biotechnology.

The first stop was at the dairy farm of Hermann and Soehnke Schlichtmann in Oldendorf. The farm has been in the family for six generations but only began to focus on milk production in 1985, when they started with 16 cows. They currently manage a 340 milking cow operation and cultivate about 500 acres of grass, maize, and rye for their own feed production. They purchase soybean meal from one of the international importers and crushers in Hamburg.

The Schlichtmanns are members of DMK, a large cooperative with 7000 members and 26 factories, located mainly in northwest Germany. The Schlichtmanns’ farm is one of DMK’s model farms, open to the public, investors, and others to demonstrate the company’s commitment to sustainability. DMK has developed the MilkMasters Program to monitor and encourage producers to adopt more sustainable production practices. Producers are scored and measured against 140 indicators, and can earn a premium of up to one cent per liter on their milk. For example, if they know the manufacturer of their feed, they receive five points; if they know the soy content of their feed, they earn ten points; if the soy is recognized as sustainably produced, by a scheme such as FEFAC (under which the U.S. Soy Sustainability Assurance Protocol [SSAP] is recognized), they receive 20 points.

Milk producers in Germany are under tremendous pressure from the large retailers and non-government organizations (NGOs) to eliminate soy, and, in particular, genetically engineered (GE) soy, from their feed. Most dairy producers believe this is irrational but they need to provide what the market demands. Apparently, consumers can understand GE versus non-GE, while issues such as sustainability and sustainable sourcing guidelines are too difficult for them to understand.

The visit continued with a stop at the feed mill of Stader-Saatzucht in Apensen. With a capacity of 100,000 metric tons (MT) a year, the mill is one of the operations for a large and diverse company with holdings from gas stations to potato processing. They use about 3000 MT of soybean meal a month, buying directly from the trading company in Hamburg. The company is focused on high quality, specialized feed products. The managers stated that they will produce whatever the market wants, which increasingly means non-GE soy. There is great pressure, including European Commission (EC) member state government subsidies and research, to eliminate soy altogether from the feed, using locally produced rapeseed and other alternative crops. However, no alternative has the same attributes as soy in terms of protein quality and price.

On the final day, the USSEC group visited the farm of Thomas Kunz in Heidenrod-Niedermeilingen. Mr. Kunz is the vice president of the Hessian Farmers Association (in the Frankfurt region) and operates farms in three different locations with a total of almost 2000 acres, a large operation by German standards. The Kunz farm is located in a small village that dates back almost 400 hundred years. The Kunz operation is focused on high quality customized swine production for local butchering and processing. He produces almost all of his feed, purchasing soymeal as needed for his feeding requirements. The group visited his buildings, and saw his feed processing and farm equipment before tasting the pork products available in his small on-farm shop.

USSEC Elucidates Added Value Of U.S. Soybean Meal To Polish Swine Market Influencers

Monday, August 15, 2016
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
USSEC recently brought Dr. Jannes Doppenberg, a swine nutrition and feed manufacturing expert of Schorthorst Feed Research in the Netherlands, to Poland to work with…

USSEC recently brought Dr. Jannes Doppenberg, a swine nutrition and feed manufacturing expert of Schorthorst Feed Research in the Netherlands, to Poland to work with selected swine production influencers.

USSEC consultant Dr. Jannes Doppenberg worked with Polish swine feed manufacturer LIRA-Pasze, which had just begun operating its brand new feed mill dedicated to Porcus brand piglet feed.

USSEC consultant Dr. Jannes Doppenberg worked with Polish swine feed manufacturer LIRA-Pasze, which had just begun operating its brand new feed mill dedicated to Porcus brand piglet feed

The project involved a tour of Poland by Dr. Doppenberg and Jerzy Kosieradzki, USSEC Technical Director – Northeast Europe, which aimed to illuminate the added value of U.S. soybean meal on a personal level to nutritionists representing key commercial feed and pig growing companies. For this endeavor, in-company meetings worked better than group sessions such as seminars or conferences because of language differences, but, most importantly, because trust and confidence need to be built before nutritionists are willing to discuss their feed formulation work in detail with “outside” consultants.

Among the customers visited was CEDROB, Poland’s largest chicken integrator, which is now expanding into integrating swine production. They already have 9000 sows, which has given them the possibility to develop a full line of piglet, pig, and sow feeds. They were shown in greater detail the added value of U.S. soybean meal in reducing production costs per bird and pig produced.

At LIRA-Pasze, a feed compounder, their main production is pig feeds, which represents 70 percent of total feed production. The company specializes in high margin piglet feeds (branded as Porcus) and manufactures piglet feeds for Cedrob. The company operates three feed mills. They have focused strongly on feed technology by using extruders. Although LIRA’s feed production is relatively low, they are the market leader in piglet feeds and the use of extruders. Convincing Lira to exclusively use U.S. soybean meal as a high quality soybean meal source in their piglet feeds will help to position U.S. Soy in Polish pig feed production.

Smithfield is by far the leader in pig production and meat processing in Poland, and Agriplus is their integrated pig growing company. Currently, they have 80,000 sows with plans to increase to 120,000 in 3-4 years and then to 145,000 sows. The largest sow farm they own has over 10,000 sows and they use 90 percent contract growers to finish pigs. They currently produce around 850,000 tons of feed a year and will need to expand as sow/pig numbers increase. They have feed mills and slaughter facilities all over Poland. Because they want to produce more antibiotic free pork, protein quality will need to be very high in order to keep the crude protein content as low as possible. The usage of higher quality U.S. soybean meal was recommended.

At Agriplus, Dr. Doppenberg (left) worked mostly with the company’s two technologists/nutritionists, Sylwia Kuśnierek and Maciej Bestyński. (Agriplus’s production facilities from the outside and inside are shown on the pictures in the background).

At Agriplus, Dr. Doppenberg (left) worked mostly with the company’s two technologists / nutritionists, Sylwia Kuśnierek and Maciej Bestyński. (Agriplus’s production facilities from the outside and inside can be seen in the background pictures)

Further professional discussions with these and other influencers of the Polish swine production sector about cutting edge swine nutrition and production know-how, including optimal utilization of U.S. soybean products and USSEC assistance, are planned for FY17.

USSEC Participates in International Poultry Forum Baikal 2016

Monday, July 25, 2016
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
Tags Euro-Asian Poultry Association International Poultry Council International Poultry Forum LLC nternational Poultry Forum Baikal 2016 
The Euro-Asian poultry conference, “International Poultry Forum Baikal 2016,” was held July 4-8 in Ulan-Ude, the capital of the republic Buryatia (located in the…

The Euro-Asian poultry conference, “International Poultry Forum Baikal 2016,” was held July 4-8 in Ulan-Ude, the capital of the republic Buryatia (located in the Asian part of the Russian Federation). The Russian organizer of the event, International Poultry Forum LLC, is a member of the International Poultry Council and of the Euro-Asian Poultry Association. Attendees included representatives, specialists, traders, poultry producers, and feed compounders from different regions of the Russian Federation and from the surrounding countries of Kazakhstan, Belarus, Ukraine, Azerbaijan, and Japan. USSEC co-sponsored the conference and associated activities.

USSEC consultants presented two papers, introducing different aspects of U.S. Soy and its proper application and usage in feed formulation. Dr. Jan van Eys introduced the “Importance of Soy and Soybean Meal; Control of Quality Parameters for Soy Products and their Application in Broiler Feeding,” and Dr. Iani Chihaia presented “Fine Tuning of Ingredient Matrix for Accurate and Economic Poultry Feed Formulation.”

The presentations were well received and by the end of the lectures, participants posed several questions about U.S. Soy quality and feed formulation techniques. The information delivered during the event through the papers presented and one-to-one interactions was appreciated by the Russian, Belarus and Kazakhstan poultry and feed professionals, and they showed interest by interacting with USSEC to learn more about the advantages of soy in poultry feeding and precise feed formulation.

Active discussions and networking, visiting with end users and potential customers, and general exchanges during and around the conference represented an important aspect of the overall activities and these clearly led to opportunities to expand recognition and engagement for USSEC.

The potential of expansion for U.S. Soy exports is a great opportunity in a growing feed market with considerable opportunity to increase its soybean meal consumption. Follow-up with the various contacts established at this conference, especially those in neighboring countries, will be necessary to consolidate gains in recognition.

USSEC’s attendance and participation at this important regional conference allowed the organization to communicate its message of the advantages of U.S. Soy to a unique international audience and, consequently, allowed U.S. Soy to be positioned as a key, competitive source of value relative to soy of other origins in a region where an increase in competition is crucial for the livestock and feed industries.

During the conference opening, the chairman recognized USSEC’s participation and sponsorship. USSEC consultants presented two papers introducing U.S. Soy’s advantages, proper application, and efficient use through modern feed formulation techniques. Conference delegates were interested in getting USSEC technical literature. The event facilitated excellent interaction between participants from different countries

During the conference opening, the chairman recognized USSEC’s participation and sponsorship. USSEC consultants presented two papers introducing U.S. Soy’s advantages, proper application, and efficient use through modern feed formulation techniques. Conference delegates were interested in getting USSEC technical literature. The event facilitated excellent interaction between participants from different countries.

 

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Dr. Chihaia with Dr. Sergey Shabaev, the chairman of the International Poultry Forum, and with delegates from Japan and Azerbaijan.

 

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During the forum, USSEC delegates had the opportunity to communicate openly and informally with end users, which is key in developing relationships with local customers. Sergei Kulbitski, deputy general director for production of the 1st Minskaya Ptitse Fabrica, the largest layer integrator from Belarus, discusses egg quality from the local Buryatia layer factor with Dr. Maria Domoroshchenkova and Dr. Chihaia. Dr. van Eys and Erbol Toybayev, general director of Alatau-Kus Broiler Integration from Kazakhstan.

USSEC Plans New Location for FY16 Offshore Marine Fish Cage Culture Study Tour: Malta and Italy

Monday, July 25, 2016
Category Aquaculture General News Greater Europe 
Tags hatchery offshore marine fish cage 
In May, USSEC visited and investigated the offshore marine fish cage aquaculture industry in Malta to evaluate whether it would be a suitable replacement for the recently…

In May, USSEC visited and investigated the offshore marine fish cage aquaculture industry in Malta to evaluate whether it would be a suitable replacement for the recently cancelled (due to ongoing security concerns) team tour to the offshore industry in Izmir, Turkey.

USSEC Aquaculture Program Lead Technical Consultant – SEA Lukas Manomaitis worked with a local expert, Dr. Carmelo Agius, to get an overview of Malta’s marine fish cage aquaculture industry. Based on this trip, USSEC is confident that it will be able to bring a team to Malta later in 2016 to replace the cancelled tour in Turkey. Because Malta lacks a large hatchery facility, a trip to a suitable hatchery in Sicily is also being planned.

Marine fish aquaculture is particularly attractive for U.S. Soy products because marine fish require ingredients that are of high quality and very consistent.

Harvest activity of European sea bream at P2M’s offshore site in Malta

Harvest activity of European sea bream at P2M’s offshore site in Malta

USSEC Aquaculture Program Lead Technical Consultant - SEA Lukas Manomaitis with offshore cages in background near Malta

USSEC Aquaculture Program Lead Technical Consultant – SEA Lukas Manomaitis poses with offshore cages in the background near Malta

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – USSEC ANNOUNCES EU APPROVAL OF THREE SOY EVENTS

Friday, July 22, 2016
Category General News Greater Europe Press Release 
ST. LOUIS (July 22, 2016) – The U.S. Soybean Export Council (USSEC) is pleased to announce the long awaited European Union approval of three biotech soy traits for…

ST. LOUIS (July 22, 2016) – The U.S. Soybean Export Council (USSEC) is pleased to announce the long awaited European Union approval of three biotech soy traits for import and processing. The three stacked events are:

  • Monsanto’s Xtend (dicamba x glyphosate MON87708 x MON89788)
  • Monsanto’s Vistive Gold (high oleic x glyphosate MON87705 x MON89788)
  • Bayer CropScience’s Balance GT (glyphosate x HPPD inhibitor FG72)

“The EU’s approval of these events is welcome news for U.S. soybean farmers,” said USSEC chairman Laura Foell, a soybean grower from Schaller, Iowa. “We’re happy that we can supply our European customers with a reliable supply of safe food.”

Europe is one of the largest customers of U.S. soybean farmers with over 165 million bushels of soybeans in exports already this year.

In 1996, U.S. growers began to adopt biotechnology on their farms. Today, twenty years later, growers are expected to plant 94 percent of their soybean acres with biotech soybeans. The technology allows U.S. soybean farmers to produce a healthy, affordable protein source sustainably with increased yields on less land, which helps to feed a growing world population. Biotech seeds allow farmers to limit their impact on the land as they apply fewer pesticides and herbicides, along with employing sustainable practices such as no-till that helps them to achieve a better moisture content in the soil in addition to reducing erosion and cutting carbon dioxide emissions and also helps to reduce energy consumption. Biotech also reduces the amount of crops that are lost due to variables such as insects or drought, which helps keep food prices more affordable.

The U.S. Soybean Export Council aims to maximize the use of U.S. Soy internationally by meeting the needs of global customers that use U.S. Soy in human food and feed for poultry, livestock and fish. The organization uses a global network of stakeholder partnerships, including soybean farmers, exporters, agribusinesses, agricultural organizations, researchers and government agencies, to accomplish that mission. USSEC programs are partially funded by the United Soybean Board (USB).

For more information, contact Lisa Humphreys at (636) 449-6040 or LHumphreys@ussec.org

USSEC Organizes Risk Management Course, Country Meetings in Spain and France

Monday, July 11, 2016
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
June was a busy month in Southern Europe for USSEC. In addition to attending national and regional feed association assemblies usually held in June, USSEC organized a…

June was a busy month in Southern Europe for USSEC. In addition to attending national and regional feed association assemblies usually held in June, USSEC organized a risk management course in Tarragona, Spain; a country meeting in Murcia, Spain; and a country meeting in Rennes, France.

Risk Management Course in Tarragona

Risk Management Course in Tarragona

The risk management course, coordinated with FCStone, boasted an attendance of 40 customers hailing from all regions of Spain. The course objective was to teach raw materials management and how to reduce purchasing risk in a volatile market, especially related to soybean meal. Participants had the opportunity over the two-day course to learn how markets work and studied several tools to manage risk in a constantly changing market. The training program also provided USSEC with an opportunity to present the U.S. soybean meal quality advantage and disseminate information about the U.S. Soybean Sustainability Assurance Protocol (SSAP) and U.S. Soy sustainability. The importance of sustainability in purchasing is increasing in Spain but is still below Northern European levels.

USSEC also held two country meetings in June. The first took place in Murcia, Spain with the feed association collaboration. Murcia is located in a major area of Spain’s pork production. 25 customers attended the meeting, and the agenda focused on quality, sustainability and soy markets. USSEC consultant Jan van Eys discussed quality, Jaime Nola Miralles of FCStone talked about general raw material markets and how to manage risk; and USSEC consultants Mercedes Ruiz and Lola Herrera spoke about cask markets in the Spanish ports. USSEC’s mission and its activities in Spain and Europe were presented during the introduction.

USSEC collaborated with the U.S. consulate in Bretagne, and the Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) in Paris to hold a similar program in Rennes. This country meeting also featured a presentation about soybean markets from Lucile Lefebvre, FAS – Paris, and a presentation about the French market was given by Christophe Callu Merite, Feed Alliance General Manager, Sanders purchasing part of the Avril Group. 28 key French feed compounders and soybean meal importers attended the meeting.

Country Meeting in Rennes

Country Meeting in Rennes

Country Meeting in Rennes

Country Meeting in Rennes

 

USSEC Participates in Feed Association Assemblies in Southern Europe

Monday, July 11, 2016
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
Spring is a busy time for the feed associations assemblies in southern Europe. USSEC collaborates with many country level associations including IACA in Portugal, ASSALZOO…

Spring is a busy time for the feed associations assemblies in southern Europe.

USSEC collaborates with many country level associations including IACA in Portugal, ASSALZOO in Italy, SNIA in France, and CESFAC in Spain, which represent a total of 60 million tons of industrial feed, more than 30 percent of the European market.

Sustainability was a main topic at all of the assemblies. USSEC had the opportunity to be present at all feed association events and to share the story of U.S. Soy sustainability and the U.S. Soy Sustainability Assurance Protocol (SSAP) with feed association members.

Industry innovation and competitiveness are also important subjects at these conferences.

At the Andalucia farm visit.  (Left to right):  Antonio Prada (CADECAP); Kendall Culp (ASA); Scott Singlestad (USB); and Nuria Reventos (farm owner)

At the Andalucia farm visit. (Left to right): Antonio Prada (CADECAP); Kendall Culp (ASA); Scott Singlestad (USB); and Nuria Reventos (farm owner)

In Portugal, the USSEC team discussed U.S. Soy sustainability and quality. Customers appreciated the presentation and gained a better understanding how U.S. farmers produce their crops sustainably.

In Italy, USSEC updated the sustainability situation, giving the association the good news that the SSAP is accepted in the European Feed Manufacturers’ Association’s (FEFAC) sustainability scheme.

The creation of DURALIN, the French organization for sustainable supply in all feed and food chain, SNIA, and the French co-op, has given France a strong direction in its sustainability program.

The SNIA’s annual assembly in Spain was held on June 3. In addition to sustainability, discussions focused on how the most successful businesses must be sustainable and competitive at the same time.

USSEC also participated in the regional feed association assemblies in Galicia and Andalucia, Spain. USSEC had the opportunity at both meetings to talk about SSAP during the general assembly and in one-on-one customer conversations.

The CESFAC Assembly in Spain discussed following France’s model of organizing a roundtable to present sustainability from two different views – government and industry. Lola Herrera, USSEC consultant in southern Spain, moderated the roundtable and had the opportunity to talk about SSAP and how U.S. farmers produce soy sustainably.

United Soybean Board (USB) director Scott Singlestad of Minnesota and American Soybean Association (ASA) director Kendall Culp from Indiana attended the CESFAC assembly where they had the opportunity to meet the main players in the Spanish market. The grower leaders also had the opportunity to visit the NUTRECO head office in Madrid; the port of Cadiz, a main area to import soybean meal; and a farm in Andalucia, which produces fruits, durum wheat and corn. They also travelled to Zamora to visit COBADU, which is an example of a Spanish cooperative that practices “field to table.” The coop has 14,000 association members that produce grains, hogs, cattle, chicken, and other livestock. COBADU produces feed for their association use at two plants, and is currently building a third plant.

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Diego Feo (COBADU); Lola Herrera (USSEC); Kendall Culp (ASA); Scott Singlestad (USB); and Jaime Duque (COBADU) visit a research farm

Jaime Duque (COBADU); Kendall Culp (ASA); Diego Feo (COBADU); Lola Herrera (USSEC); and Scott Singlestad (USB) visit the COBADU plant

Jaime Duque (COBADU); Kendall Culp (ASA); Diego Feo (COBADU); Lola Herrera (USSEC); and Scott Singlestad (USB) visit the COBADU plant

 

 

USSEC Attends Romanian Feed Association’s Annual Conference, Conveys Strong Message on Commitment to U.S. Soy Customers

Monday, July 11, 2016
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
Over 75 industry delegates were present at the conference and had the chance to interact and exchange ideas with colleagues and industry suppliers The third annual conference…
Over 75 industry delegates were present at the conference and had the chance to interact and exchange ideas with colleagues and industry suppliers

Over 75 industry delegates were present at the conference and had the chance to interact and exchange ideas with colleagues and industry suppliers

The third annual conference of the Romanian Feed Association (ANFNC) took place on June 30 in the capital city of Bucharest. The event is convened annually to gather related experts and industry delegates to exchange their newest ideas and experiences in the field of the animal nutrition and feed manufacturing. With the theme of “Squeezing the Most out of Vegetal Protein Ingredients,” the conference speakers focused on taking a smarter approach to better using protein and improving the conversion of feed into meat.

The theme event engaged a large amount of current as well as potential new ANFNC members who were eager to learn more about the organization and converse with their industry peers. Top feed industry suppliers Bunge, DSM, Evonik, DuPont and Andritz Feed & Biofuel joined the efforts in conference organization, and prominent international speakers discussed soy market trends, technical solutions for efficient use of vegetal protein ingredients and feed manufacturing aspects.

Daniel Herrero, conference keynote speaker and Global Protein Product Line Manager at BUNGE Europe, offered an review of soybeans and soybean meal supply and demand, while USSEC consultant Iani Chihaia gave a comprehensive presentation on vegetal protein ingredient usage in animal nutrition and consumption trends in the world. Mr. Chihaia also highlighted the benefits of U.S. Soy in terms of amino acids digestibility and dollar saving derived from correct soy application and use in animal feeding.

The European Crop Report, presented by Anca Ion of Evonik, provided a perspective on nutrient content of Romania’s major feed ingredients, emphasizing the impact of soy variability on poultry performances. DSM and DuPont’s speakers detailed the enzyme products available today to get as much as possible form soybean meal: energy, amino acids and phosphorus. Advanced feed conditioning technology for improved thermal modification of protein raw materials introduced by Andritz’s speaker was a topic of high interest, as well.

In addition to quality presentations, the active participation of the key industry influencers contributed to the success of this year’s conference. This success was driven not only by the fact that the participants were able to obtain the most current and professional information on trends in the global agricultural business, but also to achieve short- and long-term business arrangements.

Eda Kizilcelik, association president, made an opening statement about ANFNC and its role in sustainable feed industry development in Romania

Eda Kizilcelik, association president, made an opening statement about ANFNC and its role in sustainable feed industry development in Romania

Participants understood that precision ingredients analysis, proper use of the enzymes and superior feed manufacturing are factors impacting animal production efficency

Participants understood that precision ingredients analysis, proper use of the enzymes and superior feed manufacturing are factors impacting animal production efficency

 

USSEC Holds Advanced Poultry Production & Nutrition Training Course For Turkish & Northeast European Customers

Monday, July 11, 2016
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
A group of Polish, Czech & Turkish trainees at a break during the classroom program at UPM USSEC held its exclusive training course devoted to recent advances in poultry…
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A group of Polish, Czech & Turkish trainees at a break during the classroom program at UPM

USSEC held its exclusive training course devoted to recent advances in poultry production and nutrition at the Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Agronomos of the Madrid Polytechnic University (UPM), Spain. Dr. Gonzalo G. Mateos, USSEC consultant and professor at UPM, coordinated the course. The event’s audience was composed of commercial nutritionists of key poultry integrators and compound feed manufacturers from Turkey, Poland and the Czech Republic, who were recruited and accompanied by two USSEC local representatives, Sirri Kayhan (Turkey) and Jerzy Kosieradzki (Northeast Europe).

The lineup of lecturers included twelve Spanish academics and commercial experts and one Norwegian scientist. The classroom portion of the course began with digestive physiology that prepared the ground for more in-depth broiler nutrition topics such as feeding programs and flock management, genetic improvement, and health and animal welfare, all of which are nutritional factors affecting wet litter problems in poultry. The focus on optimal utilization of various nutrients began with starch and fat digestion, fiber, energy sources, and protein sources, with a special focus on soybeans and soybean products, to move to the use of feed additives.

A special section was devoted to broiler production in hot weather, microbial contamination in feed production and feedstuffs, and final feed products’ quality control programs, with soybean meal being widely commented upon. Two speakers shared practical aspects of feeding broiler chicks and the effects of management on carcass quality in finished broilers. Some time was given to feeding the modern laying hen that included feed form, particle size and nutrient requirements and influencing egg quality with nutrition, etc.

Feed mill design, with special attention to its effects on hygiene, cost efficiency and product quality, was followed by feed milling technology. Both topics were taught on the second day. The speakers discussed quality and feed safety programs in the EU-28 with the participants.

After three days of long and intensive classes, the participants went on a bus tour of the Spanish feed labs (Cargill’s Central Quality Control Lab in Madrid), poultry growing complex (Cesar de Escalona’s farm at Malpica de Tajo), commercial feed mill (Veravic integration at Casatejada), and commercial broiler farm (Julian Cepeda at Caceres) to supplement theoretical and practical training. The participants were especially pleased that Dr. Mateos traveled with them as a chief trainer and was able to explain the many professional issues raised during the field visits and discuss the content of some of the lectures as well.

Speaking on behalf of all training course participants, Elzbieta Pietkiewicz, a poultry veterinarian and nutritionist at the third largest feed company in Poland, said, “It was the best training program I have ever participated in, with the exception of a similar one held also by USSEC in Madrid three years ago. In just a week’s time we had a chance to learn so much and discuss the many practical issues we face in our daily work. We were honored by having such a great group of speakers sharing their knowledge with us.”

The paricipants were eager to explore almost every inch of Veravic’s feed mill, as well as their safety and quality management procedures

The paricipants were eager to explore almost every inch of Veravic’s feed mill, as well as their safety and quality management procedures

The international group visits a newly built broiler house at Caceres

The international group visits a newly built broiler house at Caceres

The Central Quality Control Laboratory of Cargill hosted the participants at their premises and shared their procedures, equipment and rich experience; Dr. Mateos acted as an interpreter

The Central Quality Control Laboratory of Cargill hosted the participants at their premises and shared their procedures, equipment and rich experience; Dr. Mateos acted as an interpreter

USSEC Supports Polish Feed & Livestock Industries’ Battle Against Biotech Feed Ban by Organizing GM Soy & Feed Seminar In Warsaw

Sunday, July 3, 2016
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
Acting upon a request from the Polish Grain & Feed Chamber, a longtime USSEC cooperator, and its allies in Poland’s poultry, swine and dairy industries, USSEC organized…

Acting upon a request from the Polish Grain & Feed Chamber, a longtime USSEC cooperator, and its allies in Poland’s poultry, swine and dairy industries, USSEC organized a special seminar devoted to the benefits of biotech soybean products and derived feeds and the threats to the European livestock industry if it turns its back on genetically enhanced soybeans.

The ban on GM feed was introduced in Poland in 2006, but has never been fully implemented, thanks to moratoriums on putting the law into practice adopted every few years under pressure from the local feed and livestock industries. The present moratorium ends on December 31 and threatens to cut the Polish food chain off from necessary soybean imports.

Marek Przeździak, a director of the Polish Federation of Food Producers and an agricultural lawyer, who works closely with EuropaBio Group, spoke about various negative consequences of asynchronous authorization of new GM crop events in the EU to European agriculture and economy as a whole. While registration of novel biotech events takes only 12 months in Australia and 23 months in the U.S., the EU needs 78 months to close such a process. Such asynchronous and asymmetric authorization increases financial risk for suppliers and leads to disruption in the whole agricultural production chain and a 25 percent rise in food prices. If only conventional beans are allowed in Europe, the disruptions in major soy exporting countries may boost soy and soy-based feed prices by more than 200 percent.

Dr. Francisco Areal, researcher at the University of Reading, UK, presented various studies proving GM soybeans were indispensable raw materials in the EU and evaluated several alternatives and their economic impacts on feed manufacturing and livestock producing sectors; he assumed both Spanish and EU perspectives.

“The total impact of a potential ban on imports of soy to Spain would result in $60 billion in added cost,” concluded Dr. Areal. “The EU could only replace 10 to 20 percent of soybeans and soymeal imported to the EU with increased production and imports of non-biotech protein-rich crops.”

The educational event was completed with a broad picture analysis by Professor Tomasz Twardowski, a Polish biotechnologist and educator, on “Polish and EU Bio Economy without GMO: Is it Possible?” and USSEC Regional Director – EU / Middle East/North Africa (MENA) Brent Babb’s expose on safety, quality and sustainability of U.S. Soy, which transitioned into a vigorous discussion.

Some interesting regulatory solutions to improve biotech feedstuffs and food trade were presented by the participants and speakers that were carefully noted by USSEC and the Chamber’s reps to be further discussed in an industry meeting with the hope to result in an official industry request to Polish legislators.

Mr. Babb assures the Polish decision makers and industry members of U.S. Soy’s sound quality and sustainability

Mr. Babb assures the Polish decision makers and industry members of U.S. Soy’s sound quality and sustainability

The Polish audience pays rapt attention to the scientific argument presented by the Spanish, Polish, and American speakers

The Polish audience pays rapt attention to the scientific argument presented by the Spanish, Polish, and American speakers

Dr. Areal presents the Spanish and European scientific and commercial perspectives on banning biotech soybeans in the European market, which the audience welcomed as additional arguments in their battle against regulatory ban on GM feeds

Dr. Areal presents the Spanish and European scientific and commercial perspectives on banning biotech soybeans in the European market, which the audience welcomed as additional arguments in their battle against regulatory ban on GM feeds

USSEC Organizes China Swine Study Team’s Visit to U.S.

Sunday, July 3, 2016
Category Animal Utilization General News Greater Europe 
A Chinese study team of 24 selected swine and feed producers from all over China took a swine intensive training course at South Dakota State University (SDSU) from May…

A Chinese study team of 24 selected swine and feed producers from all over China took a swine intensive training course at South Dakota State University (SDSU) from May 31 to June 8. The team was escorted by USSEC staff and consultants: Dr. Richard Han, Dr. Sam Shi, Sunny Zhang and Dr. Robert Thaler. All team members were able to learn U.S. advanced swine production management, nutrition requirement, barn design and ventilation system, meat quality science, manure treatment and environment control, disease prevention, and the control and merits of U.S. soybean products in pig feeds in improving China’s pig productivity in order to increase the demand of U.S. soybean products in China’s animal feed.

During the study period, the team also visited the soybean farms of Marc Reiner and Matt Bainbridge as well as the Oak Lane Hutterite Colony to personally see and learn about the U.S. sustainable soybean production system. The delegation especially valued a chance to better understand GMO soybeans. Grower leaders from South Dakota, Minnesota, Nebraska, the Iowa Soybean Board and the Iowa Soybean Association all met with the Chinese team. The team also participated in the World Pork Expo in Des Moines on June 8 on the last day of their trip.

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Dr. Han translated at SDSU'’s meat lab

Dr. Han translated at SDSU’’s meat lab

Dr. Shi translated about ventilation at SDSU

Dr. Shi translated about ventilation at SDSU

Ms. Zhang interpreted about how to cut a carcass

Ms. Zhang interpreted about how to cut a carcass