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News: Asia Subcontinent

USSEC India Approached by CLFMA to Execute Aquaculture Strategy Workshop

Monday, August 3, 2015
Category Asia Subcontinent General News 
The Compound Livestock Feed Manufacturers Association of India (CLFMA), the national trade association that primarily focuses on livestock and poultry feed industry,…

The Compound Livestock Feed Manufacturers Association of India (CLFMA), the national trade association that primarily focuses on livestock and poultry feed industry, has extended its interests to aquaculture and requested USSEC to design and implement an aquaculture workshop for entrepreneurs in East India.

Kolkata, situated in the province of West Bengal, is an area that depends on fish for daily food, a food habit primarily driven by culture. West Bengal produces about 1.58 million tons of fish per annum and is second only to the province of Andhra Pradesh, which produces about 2 million tons of fish annually. While Andhra Pradesh uses 35,000 metric tons (MT) of fish feed every month, West Bengal uses only about 3,500 MT per month indicating the need for the adoption of feed technology and the use of advanced fish farming technology. With this objective in mind, CLFMA and USSEC decided to collaborate on a workshop to influence change in market behavior and enhance the use of soy-based fish feed in the region.

USSEC’s feed program has listed capacity utilization of feed mills through market diversification and species diversification as its priorities – the outcome is envisioned as increased soy utilization due to increased feed marketing, says Dr. Vijay Anand who heads the feed/soy meal program for India. The agreement for this event was that USSEC would plan content and provide resource people required for the workshop while CLFMA would bear venue/event expenses, and would be responsible for inviting potential entrepreneurs from the region. Through this arrangement, the industry trade body contributed 50 percent of the funding for the event and also provided office and manpower support that helped extend the marketing reach.

Six renowned resource professionals directly connected with the fish and shrimp sectors of the aquaculture industry were engaged by USSEC to impart technology and trade messages to the 96 entrepreneurs who attended the interactive workshop. Officials of the state government took keen interest in the workshop to grasp technologies and absorb them into government support programs.

This is the second workshop that USSEC has conducted in the region in the past two years and since then, there have been significant inroads made in the utilization of soy-based fish feeds, said R. Umakanth, aquaculture consultant for USSEC India. Deliberations and recommendations made at this workshop further motivated the industry to advance its aquaculture status to produce more fish and shrimp in the region. Dr. Anand adds that collaborating with CLFMA on various soy utilization aspects is advantageous to USSEC because it is a trade body that frequently works with the Government of India and is directly associated with utilization and promotion of the animal feed industry in India.

USSEC India aquaculture consultant R. Umakanth introduces IPAT to the entrepreneurs at the aquaculture strategy workshop

USSEC India aquaculture consultant R. Umakanth introduces IPAT to the entrepreneurs at the aquaculture strategy workshop

Indian state government officials answer entrepreneurs' questions at the workshop

Indian state government officials answer entrepreneurs’ questions at the workshop

 

USSEC’s Soy Partnership Summit 2015 Brings Indian Soy Stakeholders Together

Monday, August 3, 2015
Category Asia Subcontinent General News 
USSEC’s national event, “Soy Partnership Summit (SPS) 2015,” was conducted on July 23 and 24 in Indore, India. SPS has shown positive growth in popularity and commercial…

USSEC’s national event, “Soy Partnership Summit (SPS) 2015,” was conducted on July 23 and 24 in Indore, India.

SPS has shown positive growth in popularity and commercial utility with unique features added to the event each year. Voluntary industry participation increased by 34 percent compared to last year’s event with approximately 400 people attending the main event on July 23. About 230 participants from 17 different Indian provinces comprised of soy buyers representing the utilization sector, mainly from animal feeds, attended.

The sellers’ side, comprised of soy crushers and traders, trust this event and has pitched in strongly with a 118 percent increase ($35,000) in funding support compared to $16,000 in 2014. For the first time, SOPA (Soybean Processors Association of India) hosted the opening dinner, along with providing additional support.

Participants provided feedback on five utility avenues: new knowledge received at the USSEC event; ample opportunity to express problems and seek solutions; networking heavily during the event; initiating trade talks and start booking soy meal orders; and, most of all, having access to a valuable, national data base of buyers’ and sellers’ contacts.

American Soybean Association (ASA) director Bret Davis and United Soybean Board (USB) director C.D. Simmons participated in this event, along with USSEC Director International Program Strategy & Research/Regional Director – ASC Drew Klein and USSEC Marketing Director – Animal Nutrition/Meal Pam Helmsing. Scott Sindelar, Foreign Agricultural Affairs (FAS) Minister-Counselor for Agricultural Affairs in India, and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) agriculture specialist Amit Aradhey stressed various aspects of U.S Soy and agriculture. Mr. Davis discussed the quality grading of U.S Soy and Mr. Simmons spoke on the sustainability of U.S Soy. These speeches gave participants a framework in which to compare advanced farming and trade process of the U.S as compared to India. The delegates from the U.S Soy industry inaugurated the event in the traditional Indian manner of lighting a lamp. The USSEC team participated with complete involvement, made impactful presentations that were appreciated by the industry and interacted with an array of industry contacts on the utilization as well as the soy production sectors, giving the event a strong U.S Soy emphasis.

ASA director Bret Davis speaks about the quality aspects of U.S. Soy

ASA director Bret Davis speaks about the quality aspects of U.S. Soy

USB director C.D. Simmons inaugurates the SPS 2015 by lighting a traditional Indian lamp

USB director C.D. Simmons inaugurates the SPS 2015 by lighting a traditional Indian lamp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WISHH consultant Masum Reja from Bangladesh and former USSEC consultant Dr. Athula Mahagamage of Sri Lanka spoke about U.S Soy trade at SPS 2015. They expressed how their countries are gradually changing their stands on sourcing U.S meal as opposed to meal from their immediate neighbor, India.

The SPS featured a global supply and demand (S&D) update that spelled out trade flows and global trends with the objective of aligning the soy stakeholders to international trade practices because there is always a disconnect between international and domestic prices of soy meal. USSEC consultant Paul Smolen talked about global S&D in great detail.

For the first time in India, USSEC gave a presentation on the “Science and Safety of Agri-Biotechnology.” The information and approaches to biotech aspects was received with full interest and understanding and this is a significant, positive move. Dr. C. S. Prakash, professor of plant genetics, biotechnology and genomics at Tuskegee University, cleared up myths and apprehensions that many Indians hold on biotech.

Two former USSEC program directors for the feed and food sectors, Dr. Dinesh Bhosale and Dr. Suresh Itapu, spoke on the current status and future potential for soy in animal feed and human food applications in India. These presentations elucidated pathways that have to be adopted by the Indian industry for building businesses using soy as an important protein input.

USSEC feed program consultants Dr. Vijay Anand and Dr. Pawan Kumar shared the index of industry interest on SPS that has developed year after year since its conceptualization in 2009. The second part of their presentation, “Soy Industry to our Knowledge,” aligned with facts and observations that were true to the industry. These in turn prompted discussions and formed the basis for analysis and understanding the soy industry and trade in India.

The post lunch session titled “The Soy Talk” is what many participants most look forward to: an opportunity to speak out and express their feelings on trade requirements. An almost full house and a 25-member panel comprised of industry stalwarts with experience debated on 14 different soy topics. The main concerns were S&D, price, quality, logistics and the need for the soy industry to recognize and cater to domestic protein requirements. Before the deliberations began, Mr. Sindelar addressed the audience, letting them know how the USDA works with Indian agriculture and trade to help India progress in different ways.

USSEC Director International Program Strategy & Research/Regional Director – ASC Drew Klein lights the lamp to kick off SPS 2015

USSEC Director International Program Strategy & Research/Regional Director – ASC Drew Klein lights the lamp to kick off SPS 2015

FAS Minister-Counselor Scott Singular addresses the SPS 2015 audience

FAS Minister-Counselor Scott Singular addresses the SPS 2015 audience

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The event’s second day started with a motivational session where renowned writer Soma Valliappan presented his impressions on SPS. Following this session, and throughout the two days, buyers and sellers were networking to discuss trade and carry out their business. Some of them also engaged with crushers to go on field trips to their soy crushing facilities and arrive at soy buying agreements.

Many key organizations known for their trade strength and functions were part of the more than 400 participants at SPS 2015, including USGC; ADM; Bunge India; Cargill India; Compound Livestock Feed Manufacturers Association of India (CLFMA); Solvent Extractors Association of India (SEAI); Soy Food Promotion and Welfare Association (SFPWA); National Egg Coordination Committee (NECC); Poultry Federation of India (PFI); Rabobank; Godrej Agrovet Ltd; Suguna Foods and Feeds; Venkateshwara Hatcheries; CP India; Indian Tobacco Company (ITC); Ruchi Soy; Adani Wilmar; Vippy Soya; and many more. Winning confidence and soliciting support from top ranking industry members is certainly an essential part of SPS that will help to foster trade and posterity.

A section of panel members at the Soy Talk Session, part of SPS 2015

A section of panel members at the Soy Talk Session, part of SPS 2015

USSEC Participates in “Make in India” Food Conference

Monday, July 27, 2015
Category Asia Subcontinent General News 
USSEC was recently invited by the PHD Chamber of Commerce and Industry to participate in its “Make in India” food processing conference. “Make in India” is a new,…

USSEC was recently invited by the PHD Chamber of Commerce and Industry to participate in its “Make in India” food processing conference. “Make in India” is a new, major national program of the Indian government and PHD is one of India’s top commerce and industry chambers, working closely with the Indian government to move their commercial and industrial agenda forward. This program was held in Madhya Pradesh, which is considered the soy bowl of India.

“Make in India” is the agenda of India’s current prime minister with a focus on inviting domestic and international investment in different areas including the food processing sector. The objective is to facilitate and strengthen domestic industry, create employment opportunities, and attract foreign direct investment (FDI).

USSEC suggested that a session on soy could be added to this conference. USSEC Director – India Soy Food Program Ratan Sharma participated as a speaker, delivering a lecture on the potential of soy food processing in India. In his speech, Dr. Sharma elaborated on soy food business opportunities, the role of soy in the food and nutritional security of India, and convinced the audience that soy food processing needs to be organized in India for India as it is most needed for Indians’ own food and feed uses, rather than selling it to other countries.

Dr. Sharma lectures about the benefits of soy food processing during the “Make in India” conference

Dr. Sharma lectures about the benefits of soy food processing during the “Make in India” conference

Dr. Sharma noted that it was encouraging to see two of India’s top food processors telling the panel and SOPA (Soy Oil Processors Association of India) officer that because India is an edible oil deficit country, they should import soybeans from countries where oil is plentiful. The processors explained that the value derived from the domestic market will be much better than the export, especially in the case of soy.

Dr. Sharma had the opportunity to personally meet the food processing minister (minister of state in Modi government). During a long conversation, Dr. Sharma discussed the present soy situation in India and the dependency on exports because soy processing is no longer a lucrative business. He suggested that her ministry could organize the soy processing business in India to meet the country’s own requirement for food and nutritional security and for poultry, aqua and animal utilization purposes. The minister assured Dr. Sharma that she will discuss this matter with the prime minister and will try to work on this issue from her ministry level as well. She covered these soy-related issues in her inaugural speech at the conference and also to the media, saying “capturing more and more value in India is the real meaning of ‘Make in India.’”

“Make in India” was well-covered by print and electronic media throughout the country.

The second “Make in India” food processing event was organized in Delhi by the CII (Confederation of Indian Industries), which is another influential chamber of commerce and industry. The cabinet minister of food processing was the chief guest. In a short meeting with the minister during the conference, Dr. Sharma discussed multiple taxation and the product approval problems which the soy industry is facing. The minister assured him that he will look into the multiple taxation issues in food products, especially with nutritional ingredients such as soy.

Scott Sindelar, FAS Minister-Counselor for Agricultural Affairs in India speaks at the “Make in India” event

Scott Sindelar, FAS Minister-Counselor for Agricultural Affairs in India speaks at the “Make in India” event

Scott Sindelar, FAS Minister-Counselor for Agricultural Affairs in India, gave a speech, mentioning that considering its oil as well as food and nutritional security, India should not depend only on its own produced soybeans but should go for imported alternatives, and he proposed that the U.S. is the best option for this.

The managing director of the SSP Pvt. Ltd. also emphasized the import of soybeans to meet Indian oil and food- and feed-related demands and to generate employment. SSP was one of the major sponsors of this event. During the session with the chief secretary (a senior Government of India (GOI) officer) of the food processing ministry, Dr. Sharma discussed soy-related issues, which the chief secretary discussed and noted.

This event was a strategic effort by USSEC to mobilize GOI resources toward organizing India’s soy food industry. The participation of FAS and its recommendations about the import of U.S. Soy made a great impact on the overall efforts and the future strategies of USSEC in India.

USSEC Director – India Soy Food Program Ratan Sharma meets with India’s food processing minister

USSEC Director – India Soy Food Program Ratan Sharma meets with India’s food processing minister

 

MAP Program Helps Soymilk Processing Company to Launch its Products in India’s School Lunch Program

Thursday, July 23, 2015
Category Asia Subcontinent Soy Foods Success Stories 
A soyfood supplier in Bhopal, India requested technical assistance from the U.S. Soybean Export Council (USSEC) to help them launch their soymilk powder for India’s…

A soyfood supplier in Bhopal, India requested technical assistance from the U.S. Soybean Export Council (USSEC) to help them launch their soymilk powder for India’s school lunch program. India’s feeding and social welfare program covers more than 240 million beneficiaries. The Government of India awarded the bid to supply soymilk powder to one million children in government schools in Bhopal and nearby districts to Bio-Nutrients India. Using funds from MAP program F15AXASC99, USSEC will help the company in all aspects of this project from the procurement of quality soybeans to the production of quality soymilk powder and its further value addition. Additionally, USSEC will work to fortify the soymilk powder with mineral and vitamin premixes to enhance its nutritional value for the program as well as for general consumption. USSEC’s efforts have already helped to make soymilk powder available across the country in retail stores. Soymilk and tofu are flourishing soyfood sectors in India with more than 850 soymilk companies in India working on a small, medium and large scale production, consuming a large amount of whole soybeans. With no food utilization specific variety of soybeans currently grown in India, USSEC will promote food utilization specific non-GM U.S. soybeans suitable for the production of whole bean based soy products for food grade crush to produce soy flour in India. If India’s per capita direct consumption reaches the U.S. level, it would require 3,600,000 metric tons of soy or about 40% of India’s production. India’s huge population gives the U.S. soy industry leverage in direct consumption of soy in products such as soymilk.

USSEC Examines Sri Lanka for Soy Opportunities in Feed and Food Segments

Thursday, July 23, 2015
Category Asia Subcontinent Success Stories 
A U.S. Soybean Export Council (USSEC) team recently examined soy opportunities for feed and food applications in Sri Lanka, meeting with the commercial specialist for…

A U.S. Soybean Export Council (USSEC) team recently examined soy opportunities for feed and food applications in Sri Lanka, meeting with the commercial specialist for the U.S. Embassy in Sri Lanka and expressing USSEC’s renewed interest in the country due to its growing economy, sales and market share of U.S Soy. In 2013 and 2014, Sri Lanka imported 100,695 metric tons (MT) of U.S soybean meal valued at $58.29 million, partly due to residual effects of USSEC’s marketing efforts from 2008 to 2012. The team visited two poultry layer farms, which import 500 MT of U.S. soy regularly each month, to note developments in the country’s feed and human food sectors. The country’s largest chicken processor, Pussulla Meat Producers, operates 75 chicken outlets in Sri Lanka and is constructing a new feed mill, which is projected to use a monthly volume of 1000-1500 MT of U.S soybean meal. The USSEC team noted that Sri Lanka has developed a unique practice of marketing at least 75 percent of its chicken through cold chains, in contrast to India and other Asian countries where wet markets usually dominate. Sri Lanka’s chicken consumption grew from 5.5 kilogram (kg)/year to 8.5-9.0 kg/year in the past three years and is expected to reach the 12 kg mark in 2016 with consumption slated to further increase as the country’s economy improves and people seek more meat in their diets. The USSEC team also visited selected retail distribution outlets and grocery stores to examine the presence of soyfoods. The stores offered a full range of meat and fish products; soy products sold as meat substitutes were popular, with brands produced by five different manufacturers. Soymilk, soy protein supplements and soy oil also had a presence on the shelves. At a USSEC-hosted event, the USSEC’s ASC regional director provided remarks and took questions on USSEC and the U.S. soy industry from 21 invited industry guests. The guests represented poultry and egg producers, feed millers and technical consultants. GMO safety and regulation was also a topic of discussion. Overall, Sri Lanka’s industry looks positive with signs of increasing sales of poultry and eggs and an expanding economy.

USSEC’s Anand is Interviewed in Indian Feed, Grain Magazine

Monday, July 20, 2015
Category Asia Subcontinent General News 
USSEC Country Director – India Vijay Anand was interviewed by the Indian magazine “Think Grain, Think Feed.” Dr. Anand’s cover interview focused on a number…

USSEC Country Director – India Vijay Anand was interviewed by the Indian magazine “Think Grain, Think Feed.”

Dr. Anand’s cover interview focused on a number of pertinent topics, including USSEC’s role in India, the current crop outlook in India and worldwide, India’s soymeal exports and demand, the Soy Partnership Forum 2015, changes in the Indian livestock industry, the use of GM soy in animal feed, and future challenges to the Indian feed industry.

The magazine is published monthly in both electronic and print versions for India’s animal feed industry and its suppliers.

Dr. Anand’s interview is available to read in its entirety here:  Interview with Dr. Vijay Anand of USSEC, India